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Author Topic: In-ceiling speaker comb filtering  (Read 5719 times)

John Roberts {JR}

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Re: In-ceiling speaker comb filtering
« Reply #20 on: December 24, 2014, 10:49:19 am »



No wonder the bar is so low for our industry :(
What I was referring to is not so much an audio industry problem but whenever there is weak accountability for spending "other people's money". Fraud is rampant in areas of our economy where government spending is significant. Medicare billing is often in the news as they catch the most blatant high profile over-billing abuses, but for every one they catch, how many less obvious frauds get away with it? And these are mature programs with established anti-fraud divisions dealing with trusted professionals like doctors.

I'm sure 2015 will be better (/sarcasm)...  8)

JR

PS: FWIW we individuals are rarely competent to second guess professionals we hire to do specialized work for us, otherwise we would just do the work ourselves. The best mechanism to deter bad actors is sharing information with other customers in the market for their services. If we tolerate bad performance in silence we make it easier for them to do the same to others.
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Don't tune your drums half-ass. Listen to what a properly "cleared" drum sounds like.   http://circularscience.com/

Ivan Beaver

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Re: In-ceiling speaker comb filtering
« Reply #21 on: December 24, 2014, 02:04:20 pm »

What I was referring to is not so much an audio industry problem but whenever there is weak accountability for spending "other people's money". Fraud is rampant in areas of our economy where government spending is significant. Medicare billing is often in the news as they catch the most blatant high profile over-billing abuses, but for every one they catch, how many less obvious frauds get away with it? And these are mature programs with established anti-fraud divisions dealing with trusted professionals like doctors.

I'm sure 2015 will be better (/sarcasm)...  8)

JR

PS: FWIW we individuals are rarely competent to second guess professionals we hire to do specialized work for us, otherwise we would just do the work ourselves. The best mechanism to deter bad actors is sharing information with other customers in the market for their services. If we tolerate bad performance in silence we make it easier for them to do the same to others.
One of my projects this next year is to look at a room (9,000,000.00) budget that was designed by one of the most respected names in the industry, complete with physical variable acoustics.

It is a performing art space.

The "caretaker" of the space said it includes a line array that was installed sideways and has every other speaker tied together.

The space is only 500 seats- so a line array is the "perfect choice"-especially when flown sideways.

He said the "design firm" came into the room and listened and said it was fine.  He said (as far as he knows) they never measured anything or even got into the DSP to make any on site adjustments.

The reason I am being called in is because they are not happy with the system.

So just because somebody hires "the best in the business" and spends lots of money does not mean they will get the results they were looking for.

I have not been on site yet-so it should be an interesting "documentation" and adjustment experience.
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A complex question is easily answered by a simple-easy to understand WRONG answer!

Ivan Beaver
Danley Sound Labs

PHYSICS- NOT FADS!

John Roberts {JR}

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Re: In-ceiling speaker comb filtering
« Reply #22 on: December 24, 2014, 03:45:25 pm »

One of my projects this next year is to look at a room (9,000,000.00) budget that was designed by one of the most respected names in the industry, complete with physical variable acoustics.

It is a performing art space.

The "caretaker" of the space said it includes a line array that was installed sideways and has every other speaker tied together.

The space is only 500 seats- so a line array is the "perfect choice"-especially when flown sideways.

He said the "design firm" came into the room and listened and said it was fine.  He said (as far as he knows) they never measured anything or even got into the DSP to make any on site adjustments.

The reason I am being called in is because they are not happy with the system.

So just because somebody hires "the best in the business" and spends lots of money does not mean they will get the results they were looking for.

I have not been on site yet-so it should be an interesting "documentation" and adjustment experience.
One would think that the architectural spec for a $9M install might include some performance metrics describing frequency response and SPL over some pre-defined coverage pattern. If the job doesn't meet spec no $9M payday.

JR

PS: Ivan you should be happy, you are getting paid to fix other people's mistakes. 
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Don't tune your drums half-ass. Listen to what a properly "cleared" drum sounds like.   http://circularscience.com/

Ivan Beaver

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Re: In-ceiling speaker comb filtering
« Reply #23 on: December 24, 2014, 03:59:22 pm »



PS: Ivan you should be happy, you are getting paid to fix other people's mistakes.
And there is A LOT of that type of work out there.  Good in one case and embarrassing for the industry.

It is AMAZING how many screwed up systems are out there.

And the really sad thing is that the person who put it in actually thinks that is it "fine" or doesn't realize there is a problem with the install.

Oh how low the bar is in so many cases.
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A complex question is easily answered by a simple-easy to understand WRONG answer!

Ivan Beaver
Danley Sound Labs

PHYSICS- NOT FADS!

ProSoundWeb Community

Re: In-ceiling speaker comb filtering
« Reply #23 on: December 24, 2014, 03:59:22 pm »


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