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Author Topic: Using a router as a switch  (Read 4891 times)

Riley Casey

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Using a router as a switch
« on: November 06, 2014, 05:46:32 pm »

THis is a follow up to an earlier thread about wired routers for use with Shure UHF-R systems.  I found a few older Netgear FVS318 routers on Ebay at a price that made experimentation painless and a size the JUST barely fits into the rack.  Reset the parameters and it all works like a charm with four receivers per rack and easy access to connect a laptop for WWB duties.  Now prior to starting this process I had done some Googling on the topic of disabling DHCP on routers to turn them into switches and I planned to do that on these routers when I needed to connect multiple racks.  Simply connect to router B , turn off DHCP and restart then connect the laptop to router A and connect a port on router A to a port on router now switch B.  Lotsa sites on Google say no problem except it doesn't work.  Both routers work normally but the switch only router is not passing IPs thru to the receivers in its rack.  Any network gurus have an idea as to what might be the issue?

frank kayser

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Re: Using a router as a switch
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2014, 05:53:31 pm »

THis is a follow up to an earlier thread about wired routers for use with Shure UHF-R systems.  I found a few older Netgear FVS318 routers on Ebay at a price that made experimentation painless and a size the JUST barely fits into the rack.  Reset the parameters and it all works like a charm with four receivers per rack and easy access to connect a laptop for WWB duties.  Now prior to starting this process I had done some Googling on the topic of disabling DHCP on routers to turn them into switches and I planned to do that on these routers when I needed to connect multiple racks.  Simply connect to router B , turn off DHCP and restart then connect the laptop to router A and connect a port on router A to a port on router now switch B.  Lotsa sites on Google say no problem except it doesn't work.  Both routers work normally but the switch only router is not passing IPs thru to the receivers in its rack.  Any network gurus have an idea as to what might be the issue?
Are you using just the LAN ports?  You will want to avoid using the WAN port in any hookup on any router other than the one connected to the cable modem or DSL connection.  I'm assuming you're not using it to connect to the internet, therefore there probably shouldn't be any WAN port connection.
« Last Edit: November 06, 2014, 05:55:59 pm by frank kayser »
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Chris Hindle

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Re: Using a router as a switch
« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2014, 08:17:36 pm »

Make sure each one has a unique IP address??
Switches don't have addresses, but routers do. Maybe that is getting in your way .....
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Tom Bourke

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Re: Using a router as a switch
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2014, 12:33:41 am »

Are you using just the LAN ports?  You will want to avoid using the WAN port in any hookup on any router other than the one connected to the cable modem or DSL connection.  I'm assuming you're not using it to connect to the internet, therefore there probably shouldn't be any WAN port connection.
You can also set the WAN port to bridged mode.  DDWRT can also use the WAN port as part of the switch.  I am not sure if DDWRT runs on that router or not.
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Rob Spence

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Re: Using a router as a switch
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2014, 12:36:25 am »

Just turning off DHCP doesn't make a router into a switch.


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Andrew Hollis

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Re: Using a router as a switch
« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2014, 11:27:07 am »

Based on clues in the post, I don't think DDWRT is the road to go down here...

Rob and Chris's comments are sensible.

A router with multiple ports is always a switch, regardless of DHCP status. If you just needed a switch just get a switch. One buys a router so that one may use DHCP, that's the whole point of a router most of the time.

Frankly, DHCP is more useful, I don't know why one would disable it. If you want permanent addressing, use the static DHCP addressing within the router.

The mistake I believe you made is you turned off DHCP but didn't then go to each client and manually assign fixed IP addresses on a common subnet for each--which seems to me more trouble than using DHCP and letting that take care of it automatically.

Also, multiple routers is generally not necessary unless you have a specific need to separate multiple devices from each other, which I doubt you do in this case.

frank kayser

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Re: Using a router as a switch
« Reply #6 on: November 07, 2014, 11:58:46 am »

Based on clues in the post, I don't think DDWRT is the road to go down here...

Rob and Chris's comments are sensible.

A router with multiple ports is always a switch, regardless of DHCP status. If you just needed a switch just get a switch. One buys a router so that one may use DHCP, that's the whole point of a router most of the time.

Frankly, DHCP is more useful, I don't know why one would disable it. If you want permanent addressing, use the static DHCP addressing within the router.

One can only have one DHCP server on the local net.  If he's already has a router, and wants this one to just operate as a switch, and the first router has DHCP enabled, then the second router must have DHCP disabled.
frank
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Brian Jojade

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Re: Using a router as a switch
« Reply #7 on: November 07, 2014, 12:02:41 pm »

Turn off DHCP and don't use the WAN port.  Then the remaining ports on the device will behave as a switch. The router functions will still be there, but since you're not using them, it won't matter.  If you use the WAN port, you are running through the router and different configurations would be needed.
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Brian Jojade

Brian Jojade

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Re: Using a router as a switch
« Reply #8 on: November 07, 2014, 12:03:28 pm »

One can only have one DHCP server on the local net.  If he's already has a router, and wants this one to just operate as a switch, and the first router has DHCP enabled, then the second router must have DHCP disabled.
frank

Sort of.  You could have multiple DHCP servers on the network with different IP ranges being handed out.  Pretty common on larger networks.
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Brian Jojade

frank kayser

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Re: Using a router as a switch
« Reply #9 on: November 07, 2014, 12:11:41 pm »

Sort of.  You could have multiple DHCP servers on the network with different IP ranges being handed out.  Pretty common on larger networks.
I stand corrected.  Thanks!
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Using a router as a switch
« Reply #9 on: November 07, 2014, 12:11:41 pm »


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