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Author Topic: Extension cords and voltage drop  (Read 8606 times)

Scott Wagner

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Re: Extension cords and voltage drop
« Reply #10 on: October 17, 2014, 02:23:09 PM »

Is there a difference based on the number of extension cords used?  (Assumption:  all the plugs and jacks are kept in good condition.)

I have some 40 foot and a 100 foot 12 gauge cords.  Would I see any reduced voltage inherently if I used 2 50 foot instead of a single 100 foot?

Most of our gigs I have the mains and sub within 20 feet of an outlet, so cutting the 40s down into 20s would be more convenient and make a cleaner stage.
There is loss associated with every connector.  The fewer, the better.
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Scott Wagner
Big Nickel Audio

Frank DeWitt

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Re: Extension cords and voltage drop
« Reply #11 on: October 17, 2014, 02:47:31 PM »

There is loss associated with every connector.  The fewer, the better.

I think the loss begins at assembly with the loss of the solder, then the small screws, and the little pieces of heat shrink tubing that you pre cut, and finaly the discovery of the shell that you didn't put on the cable first.

I have know idea how I know this.
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Lyle Williams

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Re: Extension cords and voltage drop
« Reply #12 on: October 17, 2014, 09:46:51 PM »

I think the loss begins at assembly with the loss of the solder, then the small screws, and the little pieces of heat shrink tubing that you pre cut, and finaly the discovery of the shell that you didn't put on the cable first.

I have know idea how I know this.

:-)
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Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Extension cords and voltage drop
« Reply #13 on: October 18, 2014, 11:06:42 AM »

I shouldn't have to clarify this, but you never know who might be listening.

When the extension cord is rated for 15 amps, that means 15 amperes, not 15 amplifiers:o
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Stop confusing the issue with facts and logic!

Lyle Williams

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Re: Extension cords and voltage drop
« Reply #14 on: October 18, 2014, 04:33:39 PM »

I shouldn't have to clarify this, but you never know who might be listening.

When the extension cord is rated for 15 amps, that means 15 amperes, not 15 amplifiers:o

Do you have a reference to back up that statement, or is it just something you made up?

I'm pretty sure you can run 15 consumer-grade rated-in-PMPO-watts amplifiers off a single outlet.  Probably more...

:-)
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Stephen Swaffer

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Re: Extension cords and voltage drop
« Reply #15 on: October 18, 2014, 07:10:05 PM »

I shouldn't have to clarify this, but you never know who might be listening.


If you put too many amps on the circuit (either kind), No one will be listening!
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Steve Swaffer

Mike Sokol

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Re: Extension cords and voltage drop
« Reply #16 on: October 18, 2014, 08:10:41 PM »

I'm pretty sure you can run 15 consumer-grade rated-in-PMPO-watts amplifiers off a single outlet.  Probably more...

:-)

I thought you could only go to 11...  8)
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Mike Sokol
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Extension cords and voltage drop
« Reply #16 on: October 18, 2014, 08:10:41 PM »


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