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Author Topic: Power for audio in a church  (Read 3191 times)

Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Power for audio in a church
« Reply #10 on: September 02, 2014, 01:08:06 am »

Yes-- well, you could easily put a bunch of wall switches somewhere (they do sell 20A switches at the big box stores) all running to dedicated outlets for your gear. Will take a bit of wiring/cabling, but can be done. If there's a wall area for all of the switches you can then number/letter them in order of powering on (and reverse for shut down). [Resist the urge to do this with the circuit breakers as opposed to a regular switch that's designed to be turned on-off regularly!]

Similar situation, I am planning to wire some lights on the outside of my shop, but I want to have switches in about 4 locations. I don't want to go broke running wires, so rather than using traditional 120V 3-way and 4-way switches, I'm considering using a relay system and running CATx cable from the relay bank to the switch locations. I've found this latching relay module, but haven't decided to go ahead because I'm not sure if there's something about this plan that could be "not recommended." It requires a single NC momentary-on push button for each relay channels.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Electronic-Component-6-Channel-DC-12V-220mA-Low-Level-Power-Relay-Module-/171166931996?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item27da581c1c

There are more channels than I need for the outside lights, but I could use it for other lights in the shop as well. One thing about this: the relay might not open in the event of a power failure. That may be a code violation but I'm not sure.

This could be applied to Ray's scenario. It sure would take a lot less space than a wall full of light switches, and would have the advantage of locating controls at FOH fairly inexpensively.
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Stephen Swaffer

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Re: Power for audio in a church
« Reply #11 on: September 02, 2014, 01:35:25 am »

The relays are only rated at 10 amps.  With hard wired lights and a controlled load that is acceptable.  I would not want to use something rated less than the installed breaker for traditional plug and cord connected loads=its just too easy to plug in a bigger sub and now you have a problem.

The relay not opening during a power failure is no different than a toggle switch.  IIRC, then opening on power failure is an OSHA requirement for potentially hazardous equipment-ie you don't want conveyor and other moving equipment starting up because someone 100 miles away flipped a switch.

If you really wanted to, you could use fuses to protect the individual switched legs.  It could be a workable solution-but a bit more complex with a few more potential failure points.
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Steve Swaffer

Jason Lucas

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Re: Power for audio in a church
« Reply #12 on: September 02, 2014, 02:03:42 am »

The more I think about it, the more I think the LED fixtures are the main issue. I asked a while back about powering them and was recommended one of these: http://www.usledsupply.com/shop/12v-150w-12-5a-power-supply-mean-well-rs150-12.html

Getting the LEDs out of the picture makes wiring up everything else a bit more simple. Three of these: http://www.lowellmfg.com/products/rpc-corded.php and one of these for the amp rack: http://www.lowellmfg.com/products/acspr-rpc1-1509k-15a.php

With a few of these for remote control: http://www.lowellmfg.com/categories/power/switches/wall-plate-switch.php
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Re: Power for audio in a church
« Reply #12 on: September 02, 2014, 02:03:42 am »


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