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Author Topic: Drum channels Alignment  (Read 4229 times)

Jay Barracato

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Re: Drum channels Alignment
« Reply #10 on: August 21, 2014, 04:43:34 pm »

Considering the 3:1 rule and the fact that a 6db or more difference in levels when combining signals makes it a neglible difference, I  usually don't worry about it.

Makes me wonder just how hot people run their overhead(s).

You actually get more interference between two overheads then you do with overhead/snare or overhead/tom interactions so I just use one. Before I would add a second overhead I would add a close under mic on the ride.

Sent from my DROID RAZR HD using Tapatalk

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Luke Geis

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Re: Drum channels Alignment
« Reply #11 on: August 21, 2014, 07:18:23 pm »

I usually only worry about time as it applies to the main PA. As mentioned there is nothing that can really be done to time align the mics to each other, but you can make it so that the signal from the mics is time aligned to the PA...... This is still a bit over the top in my opinion. I have done it before and it takes a while to get the entire kit and backline to line up. Although it is cool that it sounds as if all the instruments are the source of the sound, the amount of work required doesn't always add up to better. The depth and immersion of sound is really cool, but it closes the drums into a more mono like signal and then the guitars and bass have to be placed specifically ( in the stereo field ) to really make things hold together and line up. Then as soon as you move to another position in the room it all changes.........

In short, yes it makes sense to do it and can make for a really cool sound with clarity and depth, but it takes a bit of time to nail it in and it's not the same for everyone in the audience. The incidence of time between the mic and the PA is a constant, but the distance from the listener to the PA and the instrument is not. The only way it would truly work is if you ran a single speaker, mono system.

Also keep in mind with a stereo system you will always have one side of the PA out of alignment with the mic. The only way you could truly pull it off with a stereo rig would be to double all the tracks and pan them hard each direction. Then add in what you need from each track ( to place it in the stereo mix ) after time aligning each channel to it's respective speaker. And even after all that you still wouldn't have addressed the time difference between the listener, PA and instrument.
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Brent Venter

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Re: Drum channels Alignment
« Reply #12 on: August 22, 2014, 01:59:53 am »

Thanks for all the feedback guys.

My OP was submitted in the measurement forum because I am not getting a stable Impulse response and wanted to get some insight where there could be an issue to get IR with a volatile signal...this is an experiment for me and I believe this is how I grow my own knowledge irrelevant of subjectivity.

Thanks Tim for your method, this is how I started experimenting.
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Doug Fowler

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Re: Drum channels Alignment
« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2014, 07:47:12 am »

Thanks for all the feedback guys.

My OP was submitted in the measurement forum because I am not getting a stable Impulse response and wanted to get some insight where there could be an issue to get IR with a volatile signal...this is an experiment for me and I believe this is how I grow my own knowledge irrelevant of subjectivity.

Thanks Tim for your method, this is how I started experimenting.

If you must do it, try using either the delay finder or phase.  You can put a small speaker on the snare head, run some noise through it, and align it that way.  There is sufficient HF in the measurement for the delay finder to yield a proper value. You can tweak it with phase after that.

If you must :-)
« Last Edit: August 22, 2014, 07:49:21 am by Doug Fowler »
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Drum channels Alignment
« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2014, 07:47:12 am »


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