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Author Topic: $1000 high power Class D power amps- Peavey IPR2 7500 or Behringer NU 12000 or ?  (Read 21873 times)

Bill Hornibrook

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Does anyone have any experience with either of these two amps? It's hard to compare by just their published specs, but I'll give you what I can in the language stated on their spec sheets. Application will be for subs @ 4 ohms per side:

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Peavey - Rated watts 2 ch x 4 ohms: 2800 20ms repetitive burst, 2450 1% THD both channels driven at 1kHz.

Behringer - Maximum output power 4 ohms per channel stereo: 2 x 3400 W

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Peavey - Current draw @ 1/8 in watts: 950 @ 4 ohms

Behringer - Power consumption @ 4 ohms, 1/8 rated power: 760 W

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Peavey - net weight: 14.6 lbs

Behringer - net weight: 26.5 lbs

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Any opinion other than "don't buy Behringer" will be appreciated. Personally I've had nothing but good results with Behringer power amps. These subs (custom built 21" B&C 21SW152 loaded) have been powered with two Behringer EPX4000s in 4 ohm bridged mono for the last three years with no issues. My JBL SRX 715 tops are currently being run with an iNuke 6000DSP and I love the combination.

These B&C subs need a lot of power. Those EPX4000s are rated at 3000w RMS bridged at 4ohms mono and they take it all. Coming from Behringer that spec may be a bit optimistic, but I know I'm going to need an honest 2000 watts minimum. But I'm also on the move a lot and trying to simplify my setup. If I can get by with just one sub amp with front end DSP I can do away with the Driverack.

Use is for contemporary club DJ - yeah the bass heavy stuff that goes down to 32hz.
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Robert Piascik

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These subs (custom built 21" B&C 21SW152 loaded) have been powered with two Behringer EPX4000s in 4 ohm bridged mono for the last three years with no issues.


Then why change? To save a couple of rack spaces? And if the amp fails you're left with no back up

I'd look for a used Crown iT8k, (a little over your budget @ $1,700-$2,000) but I think that's about what it's gonna cost.

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Rick Powell

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For EDM-style or compressed dance music bass, the sustained power rating is more important than what can be momentarily provided in a short burst.  Needless to say, the amps that can sustain a peak longer at a given wattage are more capable than those who shut down to say 1/2 power for anything longer than a few milliseconds.  Without a sustained burst power test between the two amps, really hard to say which one would outdo the other in real world conditions.  At least Peavey gave a burst rating at 20ms, while Behringer didn't.  Speakerpower, the company that does OEM self powered modules and now does rack amps, had some interesting results when they compared their line against others like Crown, QSC and Lab Gruppen.

http://www.speakerpower.net/comparative-performance.html
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Scott Harris

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I am using an ipr2 7500 to drive 4 JTR Growlers, at 2 per channel.  I typically run sound for bands, but have used this setup for a few DJ gigs.  I bought the amp last summer as a test and if it went well I had planned to buy another and give each Growler their own channel.  It's now a year later and I have never had the need for additional power.  I have never noticed it pushing warm air and have never even had the DDT lights blink yet!  Love the Growlers! 

I swapped out the power connector for a 5-15p as most venues I frequent don't have L5-20 connections.  I typically connect the amp to a dedicated circuit, but have been forced to run it with my monitors at a few gigs and have not tripped a breaker yet.

If my current amp was run over by a steam roller I would most likely replace it with a Crest ProLite 7.5 as they are now available and actually cost less than the Peavey if you know where to shop.
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Art Welter

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At least Peavey gave a burst rating at 20ms, while Behringer didn't.  Speakerpower, the company that does OEM self powered modules and now does rack amps, had some interesting results when they compared their line against others like Crown, QSC and Lab Gruppen.

http://www.speakerpower.net/comparative-performance.html
Good points, and it should be noted that 20ms is only one cycle at 50 Hz, or 1/2 cycle at 25 Hz. Enough for the initial transient of a "old school" kick drum, but seconds short for EDM.
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Brian Jojade

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I've heard very positive reviews on the Peavey IPR's, although I haven't used them.  When I've used the Behringers, my experience has been that the performance of the amp doesn't match the advertised power numbers that they list.  Their marketing department finds a way to make the amp look bigger on the spec sheets.

For EDM, you'll really see the shortcomings of the amp design quickly.  This is where higher end amps are going to make their difference known.

Using the specs you have listed, the Peavey says it needs 950 watts for 1/8 power.  The Behringer only needs 760.  Knowing that the Peaveys are EXTREMELY efficient, that tells me that the output of the Peavey is probably going to be more than the Behringer.    And the weight spec, well, the IPR wins, hands down.
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Bill Hornibrook

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I wish Behringer had given more output specs other than something it calls Maximum Output Power. Could that possibly be a 20ms burst, or are amps tested at something even shorter than 20ms?

I actually thought the weight of the Behringer was a plus since it falls more in line with what more highly regarded Class D amps like the PL380 and iT8000 weigh. The Peavey seems almost too light.

Scott when I looked up specs for the Crest Prolite 7.5, the site for the spec sheet was Peavey Commercial Audio and the amp's specs are exactly the same as Peavey's IPR 7500 minus the front end DSP - right down to the weight of 14.6 pounds! Are these the same power amps just branded differently?

The fact that the Peavey draws more current at 1/8 power definitely caught my attention though - and in a good way.
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John Roberts {JR}

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I would suggest the OP and lurkers pay more attention to posts from people who have actually used the subject amps, and less to the speculation, especially about weight. Weight is a positive for paperweights but in amp design, lower weight and higher efficiency have been the holy grail for decades.

@ Bill while I do not know for a fact, why shouldn't the Crest and Peavey amps use the same latest amp technology inside? That is just good business practice. Amps are a mature technology but the modern stuff impresses even me, and I'm hard to impress.

It is unfortunate that amp maker paper specs are not directly comparable, but even if they were, music is not cooperative about being some easy to peg consistent stimulus. So read as many first hand user reports, then apply windage for your application vs theirs.

While I could form opinions from published specs because I have actually designed amps so I can read between the lines. I won't speculate here.

JR   
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Don't tune your drums half-ass. Listen to what a properly "cleared" drum sounds like.   http://circularscience.com/

Bill Hornibrook

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@ Bill while I do not know for a fact, why shouldn't the Crest and Peavey amps use the same latest amp technology inside? That is just good business practice.

I'm not knocking it if they were one and the same. I was just asking. It would be good info to know.
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John Roberts {JR}

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I'm not knocking it if they were one and the same. I was just asking. It would be good info to know.
I have been outside the castle walls for almost 15 years now, but it's safe to speculate that if the size, specs, and weight is the same the technology inside is probably the same.

While I was working there we put similar technology inside the full range of products from fixed install amps gathering dust in a closet to powered mixers up on stage with weekend warriors. It would literally be stupid to reinvent the wheel for each and every wheelbarrow we designed (just use your best wheel everywhere you need a wheel***).

The different market segments have different treatments for details like user interfaces, packaging, connectors, form factor etc.

Note: I do not know enough about this new amp technology to know if the different markets should get different treatments under the hood.   

JR

*** of course we didn't put the same exact amp in every product but where the applications were close enough we used the same technology where it made sense. 
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Don't tune your drums half-ass. Listen to what a properly "cleared" drum sounds like.   http://circularscience.com/

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