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Author Topic: What do you use for a Router  (Read 11181 times)

Steven Barnes

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Re: What do you use for a Router
« Reply #20 on: August 03, 2014, 01:13:56 am »

I didn't say this was the most secure method, but it is a very secure method that is easy to maintain by the average user. Yes I can sniff the network, then clone the MAC address, then attach to the network, then possibly wreak havoc.

All of you out there that have the capabilities to do this during a concert other than me please raise your hand.  ::)

Not common, but I have seen it happen at a large festival. People with nothing to do but wait for their favorite band. Idol hands.....



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Scott Holtzman

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Re: What do you use for a Router
« Reply #21 on: August 03, 2014, 02:19:13 am »

I use a Cisco E3000 that I got from Costco

Sacrilege.  I can't believe Cisco ever put their name on that Linksys consumer crap.

You cam buy better but you can't pay more.  I bet the list price on a Cisco console cable cost as much as that router.

"Big Boy" Cisco wireless is way too complex for portable use.

Debbie. to be clear this has nothing to do with you and that router is as good as any your are going to get!

 
« Last Edit: August 03, 2014, 02:50:28 am by Scott Holtzman »
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Bob Leonard

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Re: What do you use for a Router
« Reply #22 on: August 03, 2014, 02:38:09 am »

Sure you can do that, but usually you need a full authentication system to support it and corporate level bend-you-over pricing for the gear and knowledge to set it up.

Security is easy, same as your wireless mics.  You wire them.  Closest you can get to 100% secure.  Beyond that it's like a bike lock.  It won't keep out anyone determined. 

Best you can do is also the same as your wireless mics.  Get the antennas in a good position, use open frequencies and buy quality gear.

From the networking/security standpoint, lots of good suggestions already.  Static IPs.  Boring ssids.  MAC address filtering is a waste of time if you're using relatively recent waps and using the best security they offer.  Anyone who can crack that knows how to clone your mac.  You don't even need special software for it, doing it on a stock PC takes all of 2 minutes.  Wanna go the extra mile?  Don't connect it to the internet.  If you're using it for show control then you don't need the internet anyways.

I like remote wireless stuff, but I'd still be real hesitant to trust a show to it.  To much stuff out of my control.

OK, you've got me, I'll stay away from MAC address security schemes and not mention it again.
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Riley Casey

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Re: What do you use for a Router
« Reply #23 on: August 03, 2014, 10:36:46 am »

Once again the OP is lost in a blizzard of angels dancing on heads of pins. All useful stiff i'm sure but several levels above the original question.   

If the OP has higher aspirations than simply getting your laptop to talk to your mixer, say for networking mixers, amps and other show control elements then my suggestions are probably below the grade.

We have two Airport Extremes and two Airport Expresses.  They all work well to control Yamaha mixers now that we have implemented some basic procedures.  First is that all the wireless routers have the default passwords changed and new device names and passwords are created and labels with that info are on the bottom of the devices.  The Airport express units are set to bridging mode as they have a single ethernet port. 
The Apple units are used because the Expresses are small and because they all rely on the Apple provided software for control rather than a browser interface.  A bit of security by obscurity but it raises the bar at least slightly.  If you are using a Mac dig down thru your Library folder to the Core Services folder and find the Wireless Diagnostics app and make an alias to it someplace easy to get to.  Use the wifi scan function ( Utilities under the Window menu ) to find the least populated band in the wifi spectrum and reset the router to use that band with the Airport control application.  Five Gigahertz is often less crowded than 2.4 but not always, the wifi scan will tell what the environment is at load in.  Run that same scan half an hour after doors and its a new ballgame.  Put the wifi router up high, well above head height. A speaker stand with a plastic shelf top works fine in fact  thats exactly what IT vendors to large conventions and corporate events use for their WAP antennas.  None of this is bullet proof in the face of thousands of smart phone totting audience members but it will improve your chances.


The concern raised so often about someone hacking into a show control network is a bit overblown I think for the average user.  If I were Disney and moving scenery with wifi control I'm sure I'd see it differently but at the moment I'm good with talking to a a CL5 or an LS9 from 100 ft away.


Right now I have a 40 dollar Netgear router that always drops on me and doesn't work very well.

I have friends that use the Airport Extreme from Apple, but I am wondering what other people are using and if it is necessary to drop 200 dollars on a router...

Scott Holtzman

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Re: What do you use for a Router
« Reply #24 on: August 03, 2014, 11:58:50 am »

Once again the OP is lost in a blizzard of angels dancing on heads of pins. All useful stiff i'm sure but several levels above the original question.   

If the OP has higher aspirations than simply getting your laptop to talk to your mixer, say for networking mixers, amps and other show control elements then my suggestions are probably below the grade.

We have two Airport Extremes and two Airport Expresses.  They all work well to control Yamaha mixers now that we have implemented some basic procedures.  First is that all the wireless routers have the default passwords changed and new device names and passwords are created and labels with that info are on the bottom of the devices.  The Airport express units are set to bridging mode as they have a single ethernet port. 
The Apple units are used because the Expresses are small and because they all rely on the Apple provided software for control rather than a browser interface.  A bit of security by obscurity but it raises the bar at least slightly.  If you are using a Mac dig down thru your Library folder to the Core Services folder and find the Wireless Diagnostics app and make an alias to it someplace easy to get to.  Use the wifi scan function ( Utilities under the Window menu ) to find the least populated band in the wifi spectrum and reset the router to use that band with the Airport control application.  Five Gigahertz is often less crowded than 2.4 but not always, the wifi scan will tell what the environment is at load in.  Run that same scan half an hour after doors and its a new ballgame.  Put the wifi router up high, well above head height. A speaker stand with a plastic shelf top works fine in fact  thats exactly what IT vendors to large conventions and corporate events use for their WAP antennas.  None of this is bullet proof in the face of thousands of smart phone totting audience members but it will improve your chances.


The concern raised so often about someone hacking into a show control network is a bit overblown I think for the average user.  If I were Disney and moving scenery with wifi control I'm sure I'd see it differently but at the moment I'm good with talking to a a CL5 or an LS9 from 100 ft away.

All good points, at the Airports work well, especially the older 3G units.  The original question was answered.  Use a WAP, mount it high and several suggestions for WAP's were made.  I suggested the TP-Link and also the Ubiquity.  Both sub $100US commercial grade PoE powered units.

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Debbie Dunkley

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Re: What do you use for a Router
« Reply #25 on: August 03, 2014, 12:16:02 pm »

Sacrilege.  I can't believe Cisco ever put their name on that Linksys consumer crap.

You cam buy better but you can't pay more.  I bet the list price on a Cisco console cable cost as much as that router.

"Big Boy" Cisco wireless is way too complex for portable use.

Debbie. to be clear this has nothing to do with you and that router is as good as any your are going to get!

I understand Scott…… it got me up and running and has been very reliable so I cannot complain. I'd really like an Airport Express but don't have an excuse to get one YET !! I like the look of that Ubiquiti antenna………..
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frank kayser

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Re: What do you use for a Router
« Reply #26 on: August 03, 2014, 03:04:31 pm »

I understand Scott…… it got me up and running and has been very reliable so I cannot complain. I'd really like an Airport Express but don't have an excuse to get one YET !! I like the look of that Ubiquiti antenna………..
More than just an antenna, that's the ENTIRE WAP.  w/o antenna, it's about $80.  The WAP is about the size of a SM57.
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Scott Holtzman

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Re: What do you use for a Router
« Reply #27 on: August 03, 2014, 04:35:34 pm »

Right....And its PoE just run a Cat5 to it and call it a day
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Scott AKA "Skyking" Holtzman

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Debbie Dunkley

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Re: What do you use for a Router
« Reply #28 on: August 03, 2014, 05:13:07 pm »

How efficient are the small internal antennas like those on the Cisco E3000 compared to the older rabbit ear style on the Linksys? I have an old Linksys G 2.4ghz that I used for years and at some point I purchased larger ears for it.  (It looks a bit awkward these days but still works well)
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Bob Leonard

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Re: What do you use for a Router
« Reply #29 on: August 03, 2014, 07:00:44 pm »

Debbie,
Shape of the antenna does not indicate efficiency. Antenna's are cut in length for the frequency they are designed to work at and they are measured in wave length. What makes a difference is the receiver/transmitter, it's design and capabilities.

Riley's correct. This thread has gone way past what the OP had intended, has swerved way off path, and has started to become meaningless. Simplistic questions only require simplistic and suitable answers and "look what I know" answers only lead to confusion. So.........


OP, I have access to any type router or WAP, but for home use or for use with my system all of my access points are of the type at the link below.

http://www.netgear.com/business/products/wireless/business-wireless/

If you feel a need to spend more money these work well. Be aware though that you put yourself in a position where additional configuration and security beyond a simple listing of MAC addresses may put you in a position where you need experienced help to support the product.

http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/products/wireless/access-points/index.html

And there are others.

Keeping Rileys comments in mind this will be my last post to this thread.



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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: What do you use for a Router
« Reply #29 on: August 03, 2014, 07:00:44 pm »


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