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Author Topic: What do you use for a Router  (Read 11182 times)

Ryan Tolzmann

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What do you use for a Router
« on: August 02, 2014, 01:48:51 am »

Not sure if this can go in this forum, or the console connectivity forum, so if it needs to be switched, go for it!

Right now I have a 40 dollar Netgear router that always drops on me and doesn't work very well.

I have friends that use the Airport Extreme from Apple, but I am wondering what other people are using and if it is necessary to drop 200 dollars on a router.

So I am looking for suggestions on what is out there and what works with minimal problems?

Thanks!
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Ryan Tolzmann
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Scott Holtzman

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Re: What do you use for a Router
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2014, 02:20:52 am »

Not sure if this can go in this forum, or the console connectivity forum, so if it needs to be switched, go for it!

Right now I have a 40 dollar Netgear router that always drops on me and doesn't work very well.

I have friends that use the Airport Extreme from Apple, but I am wondering what other people are using and if it is necessary to drop 200 dollars on a router.

So I am looking for suggestions on what is out there and what works with minimal problems?

Thanks!

There are several threads on networking and remote controlling boards.  $40 routers are garbage, so are some $200 ones.  The bottom of line is that you don't need a router at all unless you are connecting to another network or the Internet, something rarely done for a portable audio system.

What you need is an access point.  You can get them with various coverage patterns or omni in various form factors.  I have a TP-Link mounted on a commercial tripod with an external Omni antenna.  The height above the crowd and having no coax loss by mounting the AP to the tripod insures maximum usable output is applied to the antenna.  Further instead of a wall wart these devices are PoE and require only an Ethernet cable back to your switch.  PoE capable switches are under $50 and if you are like me you always have a few more Ethernet devices to be plugged in at FOH so having a switch is a real convenience. 

This also forces you to use static IP's on the wifi profiles for your network exponentially increasing the security by not offering up the network connection via DHCP.

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Scott AKA "Skyking" Holtzman

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Bob Leonard

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Re: What do you use for a Router
« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2014, 02:25:29 am »

Ryan,
The world is obsessed with the word router, and most people don't really understand what a router should be used for. You can add the complexity of a router to your audio network, use 1/4 of the routers features, never utilize the router for it's designed purpose, or you can use an access point.

A WAP is the correct and most reliable method available for accessing devices wirelessly. Multiple low cost WAPs can be located within the same network. The WAPs then become available as you move from one location to the next, and depending on the signal quality, location, and configuration provide seamless connectivity much like a cell phone.

My preferred network access method for wireless devices is through the use of a WAP(s). My method for accessing the WWW from the network I have attached to will be through a router.

I am not a huge Netgear fan, however, they make a good number of reliable low cost access points.

   http://www.netgear.com/business/products/wireless/business-wireless/
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Bob Leonard

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Re: What do you use for a Router
« Reply #3 on: August 02, 2014, 02:26:47 am »

Simultaneous post. Honest to god Scott, great minds think alike.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2014, 02:30:29 am by Bob Leonard »
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BOSTON STRONG........
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Ryan Tolzmann

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Re: What do you use for a Router
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2014, 02:30:12 am »

There are several threads on networking and remote controlling boards.  $40 routers are garbage, so are some $200 ones.  The bottom of line is that you don't need a router at all unless you are connecting to another network or the Internet, something rarely done for a portable audio system.

What you need is an access point.  You can get them with various coverage patterns or omni in various form factors.  I have a TP-Link mounted on a commercial tripod with an external Omni antenna.  The height above the crowd and having no coax loss by mounting the AP to the tripod insures maximum usable output is applied to the antenna.  Further instead of a wall wart these devices are PoE and require only an Ethernet cable back to your switch.  PoE capable switches are under $50 and if you are like me you always have a few more Ethernet devices to be plugged in at FOH so having a switch is a real convenience. 

This also forces you to use static IP's on the wifi profiles for your network exponentially increasing the security by not offering up the network connection via DHCP.

I realize there are threads on networking and connectivity, but through the search bar, I did not really find any that were directly answering my question.

And I know 40 dollar routers are pretty terrible, I've just been putting off the investment now for too long, and wanted to see what others are using.

I do however, appreciate your input as to what you use and recommendation.  I will definitely look into a TP-Link.
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Ryan Tolzmann
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: What do you use for a Router
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2014, 02:41:58 am »

I realize there are threads on networking and connectivity, but through the search bar, I did not really find any that were directly answering my question.

And I know 40 dollar routers are pretty terrible, I've just been putting off the investment now for too long, and wanted to see what others are using.

I do however, appreciate your input as to what you use and recommendation.  I will definitely look into a TP-Link.

I'm on the same crusade as Bob L, router and WAP are not interchangeable terms as the devices really are different.

That said, almost any thread that turns up in a search for "router" will probably have some gems of wisdom and some outright hogwash.  We've got a few Real Network Genuii here on the forums, some more who well versed in the day to day practical aspects of networked audio system components, and some of us who try to keep up.  What you will find is that there some hard and fast absolutes about TCP/IP networking, and that within it, there are typically multiple ways of achieving a working result (perhaps ugly and inelegant, but working).

In general there are two considerations - how well does the RF side of the WAP work, and how you configure your wireless access and security.
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"Practicing an art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow, for heaven's sake. Sing in the shower. Dance to the radio. Tell stories. Write a poem to a friend, even a lousy poem. Do it as well as you possible can. You will get an enormous reward. You will have created something."  - Kurt Vonnegut

Ryan Tolzmann

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Re: What do you use for a Router
« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2014, 03:00:26 am »

I'm on the same crusade as Bob L, router and WAP are not interchangeable terms as the devices really are different.

That said, almost any thread that turns up in a search for "router" will probably have some gems of wisdom and some outright hogwash.  We've got a few Real Network Genuii here on the forums, some more who well versed in the day to day practical aspects of networked audio system components, and some of us who try to keep up.  What you will find is that there some hard and fast absolutes about TCP/IP networking, and that within it, there are typically multiple ways of achieving a working result (perhaps ugly and inelegant, but working).

In general there are two considerations - how well does the RF side of the WAP work, and how you configure your wireless access and security.

Thank you, as I am definitely learning the differences between the absolutes and "ugly and inelegant" parts of networking.  As I am more on the end of "trying to keep up with it".  The posts that I did scroll through when searching "network, etc" had to do mostly with addressing the problems in the setting up of the network.  Which is why I decided to ask about what you use for "routers" or what I should have asked is, "what do you use for WAP's?"

I do more reading than posting on here due to the fact there are a lot of far more knowledgeable persons on here than I. And when I do post, I try to use the most accurate information as possible.  So thank you to the others that have corrected my errors and offered your advice as well.
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Ryan Tolzmann
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Scott Holtzman

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Re: What do you use for a Router
« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2014, 03:09:00 am »

Simultaneous post. Honest to god Scott, great minds think alike.

Coming from you Bob I will take that as a complement.  I just referenced you in post 14 http://forums.prosoundweb.com/index.php/topic,150806.msg1383129.html#msg1383129

You may get a kick out of it.

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Scott AKA "Skyking" Holtzman

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Scott Holtzman

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Re: What do you use for a Router
« Reply #8 on: August 02, 2014, 03:16:41 am »



In general there are two considerations - how well does the RF side of the WAP work, and how you configure your wireless access and security.

Tim, I hope you don't mind the redacted and emphasized quote.  I think security is something that needs to be discussed.  It's also an area I can give back to community.

The day is going to come when an important show is disrupted by someone bent on doing some destruction, I don't want to give any ideas so I will stop there.

Security is simple it's how much convenience we are willing to give up for the security.  You could lock down your wireless network to only the MAC's you know.  (MAC is the hardware address of an Ethernet device.  An Ethernet device on a TCP/IP network has a layer two address called the MAC for Media Access Control and the Layer 3 Internet Protocol address either V4 or V6).  The question is will the client pay for the extra administrative expense of tracking device addresses?  I am sure the underwriters would be interested if the exposure was quantified for them.

In between locking down and the generally open access we use are many alternatives.  Not broadcasting SID's, shared keys etc.  I don't think most folks realize that common wireless authentication schemes have been broken for years and simple to use tools exist for exploiting them.

Certainly a topic for another thread, depends on how motivated I am this weekend.

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Scott AKA "Skyking" Holtzman

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Merlijn van Veen

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Re: What do you use for a Router
« Reply #9 on: August 02, 2014, 05:58:03 am »

Not sure if this can go in this forum, or the console connectivity forum, so if it needs to be switched, go for it!

Right now I have a 40 dollar Netgear router that always drops on me and doesn't work very well.

I have friends that use the Airport Extreme from Apple, but I am wondering what other people are using and if it is necessary to drop 200 dollars on a router.

So I am looking for suggestions on what is out there and what works with minimal problems?

Thanks!

Ubiquity Bullet 5 GHz + omni antenna = around 90,- euros in total. Works like a charm. Also comes in 2.4 GHz. Fits in microphone clamp.



ProSoundWeb Community

Re: What do you use for a Router
« Reply #9 on: August 02, 2014, 05:58:03 am »


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