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Author Topic: Liability for shocks  (Read 7153 times)

Ray Aberle

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Re: Liability for shocks
« Reply #20 on: July 04, 2014, 09:19:47 pm »

my point was any grown man should be able to read and understand without punctuation. long ago languages were written in "running hand" and words were run together and punctuation did not exhist. so far i haven seen anything here typed in "text message" lingo but it could happen.

I meant no offense referring to you as a hillbilly as opposed to a redneck.

But no, the post that I replied to, it does NOT make sense. Again, referencing the line:  "They say you by the woodwork and the electric heater part"  - you cannot argue in any logical manner that this makes sense. There's no context to determine what is by the woodwork, and what is by the electric heater. Or "they" *saw* someone by it? I don't know. It makes no sense, and that was my point. I apologised to Mr. Finnigan if I insulted him, not knowing that he suffers from dyslexia. But, to accuse me of not being a "Grown man" because the lack of context makes the post incomprehensible is offensive to me. It's less the lack of punctuation and more the words that do not fit into the context within which they are being used.

I just am kindly asking *you* to not butt in on a situation like this. I don't think that's too much to ask for, sir.

Thank you,

Ray
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Kelcema Audio
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Jeff Bankston

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Re: Liability for shocks
« Reply #21 on: July 04, 2014, 09:20:49 pm »

well, there is the joke about drummers and how to tell if a stage is level ;)
uh oh ! i dont know that answer ! i'll roll around on the floor and think about it : )
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Jeff Bankston

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Re: Liability for shocks
« Reply #22 on: July 04, 2014, 09:27:59 pm »

I meant no offense referring to you as a hillbilly as opposed to a redneck.

But no, the post that I replied to, it does NOT make sense. Again, referencing the line:  "They say you by the woodwork and the electric heater part"  - you cannot argue in any logical manner that this makes sense. There's no context to determine what is by the woodwork, and what is by the electric heater. Or "they" *saw* someone by it? I don't know. It makes no sense, and that was my point. I apologised to Mr. Finnigan if I insulted him, not knowing that he suffers from dyslexia. But, to accuse me of not being a "Grown man" because the lack of context makes the post incomprehensible is offensive to me. It's less the lack of punctuation and more the words that do not fit into the context within which they are being used.

I just am kindly asking *you* to not butt in on a situation like this. I don't think that's too much to ask for, sir.

Thank you,

Ray
no offence taken by the hillbilly thing, i'm just being accurate. if i were from the hills i would proudly call myself a hillybilly or way up high hillbilly. as for reading the thing i have have read misspelled words and bad punctuation many times. theres even paragraphs that are purposefully done to prove that people can underatand whats being said. as for butting in i didnt consider myself to be butting in but replying to a comment in which i said i didnt have a problem understanding it. how is that butting in. this is all i have to say on this matter.
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Ray Aberle

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Re: Liability for shocks
« Reply #23 on: July 04, 2014, 09:38:53 pm »

no offence taken by the hillbilly thing, i'm just being accurate. if i were from the hills i would proudly call myself a hillybilly or way up high hillbilly. as for reading the thing i have have read misspelled words and bad punctuation many times. theres even paragraphs that are purposefully done to prove that people can underatand whats being said. as for butting in i didnt consider myself to be butting in but replying to a comment in which i said i didnt have a problem understanding it. how is that butting in. this is all i have to say on this matter.

Oh I know, and I find that I can often figure out what someone is saying, but in this case-- sursly, it doesn't make sense. Mr. Finnigan doesn't seem to want to clarify so that people can understand, which is, of course, his choice. I was hoping that he wanted to be as clear and concise as possible. It's just that with your comments, I think it's all considered a joke now, which is why your intervention was frustrating.

Alas, it is what it is. Some people are more concerned about being understood then others. I can't change others, just continue to do the best that I can.

Thanks, I will also leave this be now.

-Ray
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Jeff Bankston

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Re: Liability for shocks
« Reply #24 on: July 04, 2014, 09:42:26 pm »

...
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Rob Spence

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Re: Liability for shocks
« Reply #25 on: July 05, 2014, 12:08:28 am »

well i was wondering because i am an electrician and have ben asked to install one of those. i declined just because of the hazzard. in california "everyone" in the chain gets sued. the manufacturer , the distrubutor , the wholesaler/retailer , the installer , the end user. that got me thinking what i could get hit with.


Nothing to do with liability. In this free country you can sue anyone you want for most anything. How it turns out in court is another storey.

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rob at lynxaudioservices dot com

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Rob Spence

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Re: Liability for shocks
« Reply #26 on: July 05, 2014, 12:11:01 am »

Oh I know, and I find that I can often figure out what someone is saying, but in this case-- sursly, it doesn't make sense. Mr. Finnigan doesn't seem to want to clarify so that people can understand, which is, of course, his choice. I was hoping that he wanted to be as clear and concise as possible. It's just that with your comments, I think it's all considered a joke now, which is why your intervention was frustrating.

Alas, it is what it is. Some people are more concerned about being understood then others. I can't change others, just continue to do the best that I can.

Thanks, I will also leave this be now.

-Ray

If you replace "by" with "buy" it makes more sense.


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rob at lynxaudioservices dot com

Dealer for: AKG, Allen & Heath, Ashley, Astatic, Audix, Blue Microphones, CAD, Chauvet, Community, Countryman, Crown, DBX, Electro-Voice, FBT, Furman, Heil, Horizon, Intellistage, JBL, Lab Gruppen, Mid Atlantic, On Stage Stands, Pelican, Peterson Tuners, Presonus, ProCo, QSC, Radial, RCF, Sennheiser, Shure, SKB, Soundcraft, TC Electronics, Telex, Whirlwind and others

Ron Hebbard

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Re: Liability for shocks
« Reply #27 on: July 05, 2014, 03:07:47 am »

i have seen these Amphenol connectors in hotel ballrooms. 4/0 5 wire. the female connector is mounted on the wall. all the ones i have seen have a disconnect switch but if someone doeasnt turn the disconnect off it can be deadly. fingers can be stuck in those holes in the female connector. who is liable for that ?

Hello 'Redneck' Jeff!

In another lifetime, 1995 in this case, I was Head Electrician in a scenery and stage-automation shop located in Canada yet building shows and systems for Broadway, Germany, London England, Japan and having to work to / pass their codes and inspections; Germany's TUV inspectors were the most stringent.

To the point;
Where in North America we're used to 200 and 400 Amp 3 phase / 5 wire manufactured "Company Switches", complete with Cam-Locks, from folks like Lex Products and others, the German answer was a 'butch' C-Form panel-mounted five-pole female connector with an associated, and seriously service rated, 3 or 4 pole power relay / contactor.  3 or 4 poles because they're often fond of opening their neutrals simultaneously with all of their 'hots'. 
In amongst the holes housing the female's five contacts was a much smaller diameter hole affording access to close a pair of normally open contacts to energize the remotely located contactor.  In amongst the cable mounted male's five contacts was a smaller diameter, shorter length, pin whose only purpose was to actuate the female's internal contacts energizing the relay.
The cable's male connector needed to be fully inserted in order to have the relay's coil energized.

In the case of this particular theatre in Offenbach, suburban Frankfurt, the breaker panels and relays were located in a separate, locked, room accessible to licensed electricians only.  The panel mounted C-Form females were located where we were placing our racks housing the drives for our automation system's AC servo motors.  Each C-Form receptacle was supplied via an adjacent, lockable, non-fused isolation switch.
From memory, the 3 phase / 5 wire was 220/380 Volts at 50 Hz. and the C-Forms were rated for 125 Amps.
The way the C-Forms are designed, you can't touch the bare male contacts once they're inserted anywhere near far enough to be energized.  When there is no male connector inserted, the relay is withholding power to the female's contacts.  True, it's possible to conceive of failure modes that COULD result in the female's contacts being hot when you stick your uninsulated, long, thin screwdriver into the female's "finger protected" openings but it's a pretty good start and I believe it's working for them.  TUV actually have approved devices to simulate a 'standard finger tip' for testing and approval purposes.

Toodleoo!
Ron Hebbard
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Frank DeWitt

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Re: Liability for shocks
« Reply #28 on: July 05, 2014, 11:02:53 am »

7 to caution about the dangers of changing light bulbs

27 to point out spelling/grammar errors in posts about changing light bulbs

53 to flame the spell checkers

41 to correct spelling in the spelling/grammar flames

From  http://users.rider.edu/~suler/psycyber/listbulb.html
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Jeff Bankston

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Re: Liability for shocks
« Reply #29 on: July 05, 2014, 04:46:15 pm »

7 to caution about the dangers of changing light bulbs

27 to point out spelling/grammar errors in posts about changing light bulbs

53 to flame the spell checkers

41 to correct spelling in the spelling/grammar flames

From  http://users.rider.edu/~suler/psycyber/listbulb.html
when i change a light bulb i hire 2 certified electricians to turn the ladder i'm on. however since i started using cfl bulbs i have to get guys that reverse rotate.
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Liability for shocks
« Reply #29 on: July 05, 2014, 04:46:15 pm »


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