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Author Topic: IEM distribution antenna / combiner  (Read 17171 times)

Jerome Malsack

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Re: IEM distribution antenna / combiner
« Reply #40 on: June 20, 2014, 01:43:58 pm »

You are doing very well.  The problem is how many watts of power those TV stations put out and your little transmitters are competing for the radio space.   If you get to close, the TV station will be all you can hear.  The mic will not over power the TV transmitter.  Loudest at the antenna wins. 

Yes a pun on the   loudest at the mic    Feedback.   

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jasonfinnigan

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Re: IEM distribution antenna / combiner
« Reply #41 on: June 20, 2014, 02:44:59 pm »

Just thought I will through this in here for any of the new people to RF. Espcially if you are buying used wireless gear check the frequencies. in the US the FCC has made many of those freely available before as now restricted channels. I'm not sure if what Shure gear does, but I know the Sennheiser G2 stuff has illegal frequencies is some of it, with G3 you should be safe.
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brian maddox

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Re: IEM distribution antenna / combiner
« Reply #42 on: June 20, 2014, 03:28:01 pm »

Just thought I will through this in here for any of the new people to RF. Espcially if you are buying used wireless gear check the frequencies. in the US the FCC has made many of those freely available before as now restricted channels. I'm not sure if what Shure gear does, but I know the Sennheiser G2 stuff has illegal frequencies is some of it, with G3 you should be safe.

To clarify...

In the US it is now illegal to operate RF devices between 698 and 806 MHz [usually referred to as the '700 MHz band'].  There are many manufacturers that make units that operate in these frequencies, so when purchasing used equipment it is definitely buyer beware. 

To make things more complicated, every manufacturer uses their own set of Letter Codes to define their various frequency bands.  Shure's in particular is quite complicated with many overlapping bands for different areas of this country as well as international use.  Again, it is imperative that you do your homework when buying used equipment.

FWIW, Sennheiser Band C sits squarely in the forbidden zone.  As far as i know Band C is still available with G3 series stuff, although it would probably be less likely to appear in the US, as G3 was introduced close to the same time as the 700 MHz ban took effect.
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"It feels wrong to be in the audience.  And it's too peopley!" - Steve Smith

brian maddox
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Steve Oldridge

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Re: IEM distribution antenna / combiner
« Reply #43 on: June 23, 2014, 04:53:44 pm »

I always start with a scan of the venue environment, both outside and inside.  The FCC database is not always up to date but if it lists a DTV channel which you cant see its always better to assume it might come on at any time.  Inside scans are useful since often the building shields you from TV stations and that channel can be used since it cannot be received in your location.

In IAS the scan can be imported in a graph which shows your frequencies.  This scan I did with the TTI PSA2702 Spectrum analyzer whic is a mid range cost analyzer, about $2000.  The Yellow channels are marked as DTV.  The blue lines are my frequencies.

Here are 2 scans I took this week in midtown NY.  The first is outsice the venue and the second is inside.  Regardless of the shielding, I do not use the clearer DTV channels unless I have a particularly heavy coordination.

Please visit my webpage on RF coordination.  Best Audio Frequency Coordination.  The RF Coordination for Roadies manual might answer a lot of your questions

Pete,

thanks for the feedback.. went to your page and looked at the pdf there.. very informative. However, I would imagine that the cost to follow your process is cost prohibitive (or W-A-Y outside the budget) for the average weekend warrior types - tho' the spreadsheet was VERY informative.   Thanks for sharing that!

This weekend were were at a venue we've played many times before, but not since going all IEM's. We had 5 sets of IEM's running (4 * PSM200 and 1 * Carvin EM900), plus a combination of 4 * L6 G90/G50/G30's.   All devices are channel separated - as much as possible - on both input and output transmitters/receivers.

There was no intermod/cross-talk that we could discern. There was a little interference (that I observed while standing in one spot on the stage and turning slightly), but no-one else complained about it or brought it up.  This was typical sports-bar/club-level room with TV's going.

This has been our experience in other venues we play, but the overwhelming feedback posted here in response to Deb (and I ) is based on this being "an accident waiting to happen"  !!

OK. I can understand that, but can you/someone advise as to how to do this is a cost-effective manner ?  I've looked at Senn's WSM, Shure's WWB v6 ...  where does one find data for devices outside the inventory in those software packages.. eg: Line6, Carvin ?

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jasonfinnigan

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Re: IEM distribution antenna / combiner
« Reply #44 on: June 23, 2014, 05:23:02 pm »


OK. I can understand that, but can you/someone advise as to how to do this is a cost-effective manner ?

Do research on what frequencies you are using and where the intermod is laying. Also selling off your wireless gear and standardizing on one solution would help make it simpler.


I've looked at Senn's WSM, Shure's WWB v6 ...  where does one find data for devices outside the inventory in those software packages.. eg: Line6, Carvin ?

I'm not sure about Shure as  I don't use theirs much. but in WSM you can add a device and configure every single frequency of it, so you can really input any device once you look up the specs for it from the manufacturer.
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Steve Oldridge

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Re: IEM distribution antenna / combiner
« Reply #45 on: June 24, 2014, 10:21:43 am »

Do research on what frequencies you are using and where the intermod is laying. Also selling off your wireless gear and standardizing on one solution would help make it simpler.


I'm not sure about Shure as  I don't use theirs much. but in WSM you can add a device and configure every single frequency of it, so you can really input any device once you look up the specs for it from the manufacturer.

thanks Jason .. will go that route.
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Re: IEM distribution antenna / combiner
« Reply #45 on: June 24, 2014, 10:21:43 am »


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