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Author Topic: Invest in speaker processing to get HPF or rely on HPF within the mixer?  (Read 4646 times)

David Morison

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Not to disparage your efforts and experimenting but they actually published a response plot for the DSR118W - it seems to be less easy to find now, so maybe they took it down due to people listening with their eyes before their ears and dismissing what works as an excellent sub in practice but plots not so great.




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That's exactly what I was basing my comment off earlier, and it's still around.
http://www.yamahaproaudio.com/global/en/products/speakers/dsr_series/downloads.jsp then select the "DSR Series Frequency Response" pdf.
Like you say, not quite as easy to find as if they'd just chucked the graphs in the spec sheets or manuals like any sensible manufacturer...
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Gordon Brinton

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That's exactly what I was basing my comment off earlier, and it's still around.
http://www.yamahaproaudio.com/global/en/products/speakers/dsr_series/downloads.jsp then select the "DSR Series Frequency Response" pdf.
Like you say, not quite as easy to find as if they'd just chucked the graphs in the spec sheets or manuals like any sensible manufacturer...

Thanks. I hadn't seen that chart until you posted it. The graphs in the manual and brochures are for the top boxes.

I suppose that that chart is fairly close to what I got, (given they were each entirely different testing environments). The upper frequency roll-off doesn't look right though. The crossover point is 120 Hz. I don't know much about the FIR-X filtering, but if that were a Butterworth filter, the slope would only be -3 dB at the actual crossoxer point itself, (and -6 for a LR filter).

Oh well, either way, I did find what I wanted to know.

These little subs do sound great. Like Kyle said, they don't get the respect they deserve due to their lower wattage specs. Man, they are plenty loud and tight though, apparently because they have high driver sensitivity. I've used mine (2 single 18's) for several rock bands in small to medium size clubs and in every case so far, I've had more low end than I knew what to do with, (and I like to feel that kickdrum punching in the chest). They keep up with the DSR112 tops just fine. I may buy two more someday just for larger rooms.
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David Morison

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I suppose that that chart is fairly close to what I got, (given they were each entirely different testing environments). The upper frequency roll-off doesn't look right though. The crossover point is 120 Hz. I don't know much about the FIR-X filtering, but if that were a Butterworth filter, the slope would only be -3 dB at the actual crossoxer point itself, (and -6 for a LR filter).

Those would indeed be the corner points for the filter types, if you were just looking at the filter response on its own, or if the filter were applied to a perfectly flat speaker. Thing is though, we can clearly see there's a bit of a hump in the speaker's response that's going to skew everything, so I wouldn't worry about trying to second guess exactly how they've arraived at that nominal figure.

If they work for you with a nice smooth transition to your tops then you're all set - carry on enjoying them  :)
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Art Welter

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I don't know much about the FIR-X filtering, but if that were a Butterworth filter, the slope would only be -3 dB at the actual crossoxer point itself, (and -6 for a LR filter).
The DSR series top cabinets use FIR filters, but the sub uses analog filters.

FIR filters can flatten phase response, but the latency (time delay) required to flatten phase down to 50 Hz would be too much for live use.
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