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Author Topic: Buck & Boost Transformers  (Read 14240 times)

Peter Morris

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Re: Buck & Boost Transformers
« Reply #40 on: July 03, 2014, 12:02:55 am »

I'd be curious to dig a little deeper and ID the product, or products that are dropping out of regulation. I recall when designing for products to work around the world that low line and high line voltages were more extreme than typical data sheets suggest.

The old CS800 amp was nick named the "Burro" down in SA because it would work to silly low voltages... The Australian outback was notorious for silly high line voltages when they pumped up the distro voltage to send it too many miles down the feed lines.

My guess is some smaller domestic electronic company may have not been conservative enough about PS regulation, but somebody will be the weakest link in any chain and even old companies hire junior engineers.

JR

I’m from the Australian outback … and yes some places did have extremely high voltages, but most places were spot on 240V - 50Hz. The Australian Standard was +/- 6% at that time.  I lived on a mine site that had 40Hz power!  We ran most of our appliance through a “Buck & Boost” or auto transform   to reduce the voltage to 196V.  Mathematically that produces the same flux density in the iron circuit of the transformer.  Most things worked OK except record players – 20% de tune … no wonder as a musician my pitch and timing was never good :-\ but my CS800 was!

Another option in this case could be to use a Ferroresonant Transformer to mainatiain the correct voltage.

« Last Edit: July 03, 2014, 12:09:00 am by Peter Morris »
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Steve M Smith

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Re: Buck & Boost Transformers
« Reply #41 on: July 03, 2014, 02:41:20 am »

I lived on a mine site that had 40Hz power!

I have a book at home with advertisements for Gibson guitar amplifiers which had a 25Hz option instead of the standard 60Hz.  They must have had some huge treansformers!


Steve.
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Ron Hebbard

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Re: Buck & Boost Transformers
« Reply #42 on: July 03, 2014, 03:04:24 am »

I have a book at home with advertisements for Gibson guitar amplifiers which had a 25Hz option instead of the standard 60Hz.  They must have had some huge treansformers!


Steve.

Hi Steve;

When I was born, we had 25 Hz power in our homes, 120/240 volts but at 25 Hz, or CPS (Cycles Per Second) as we phrased it in those days.  The Sir Adam Beck hydro generating station at Niagara Falls, Ontario kept a 25 Hz generator up and running 24/7/365 to service the steel industry in Hamilton, Ontario for many years after the rest of us were forced to switch over to 60 Hz.  I can remember my Dad helping me carry four transformers that powered our 027 Lionel model railway to an exchange centre where they'd swap whatever you lugged in for 60 Hz equivalents.  People were lugging in anything and everything with motors, transformers, chokes, ballasts . . You've got the picture.
A quick Google tells me our province of Ontario took most of a decade to fully convert beginning in 1949.

Toodleoo!
Ron Hebbard
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Peter Morris

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Re: Buck & Boost Transformers
« Reply #43 on: July 03, 2014, 09:40:53 am »

I have a book at home with advertisements for Gibson guitar amplifiers which had a 25Hz option instead of the standard 60Hz.  They must have had some huge treansformers!

Steve.

I believe that the lower frequencies were about minimizing the hysteresis losses in the transformers but it did make for bigger iron circuits...

Peter
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Re: Buck & Boost Transformers
« Reply #43 on: July 03, 2014, 09:40:53 am »


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