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Author Topic: Wireless Workbench Question  (Read 3950 times)

Jens Palm Bacher

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Re: Wireless Workbench Question
« Reply #10 on: April 29, 2014, 01:39:07 pm »

I certainly couldn't show you the math, but it does happen. A high RF noise floor will degrade the audio noise performance of analog wireless transmission.
Not as much as it will degrade the range of the system. Due to the FM capture effect you can have perfectly fine sound on a channel with high RF noisefloor, as long as the wanted signal is above the noisefloor.
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Scott Helmke

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Re: Wireless Workbench Question
« Reply #11 on: April 30, 2014, 09:10:37 am »

Not as much as it will degrade the range of the system. Due to the FM capture effect you can have perfectly fine sound on a channel with high RF noisefloor, as long as the wanted signal is above the noisefloor.
But wireless audio systems almost always use companding to improve S/N ratio. Why bother unless maybe FM isn't quite as clean as we'd like it to be?
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Jason Glass

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Re: Wireless Workbench Question
« Reply #12 on: April 30, 2014, 09:08:35 pm »

But wireless audio systems almost always use companding to improve S/N ratio. Why bother unless maybe FM isn't quite as clean as we'd like it to be?

It can be as clean as we'd like, but it's not, because the FCC and most authorities, worldwide, limit the signals that we use to a maximum of 200KHz RF bandwidth.  Smaller RF bandwidth means smaller maximum FM deviation, which means lower audio dynamic range and higher audio noise floor.  Companding is the simplest means of mitigating that.

In RF, overall performance is determined by a balance of all variables.  With unlimited spectrum and no regulation, current analog technology could easily produce nearly flawless audio and extremely long range, but this can sadly never be so because RF spectrum is a limited natural resource that many interests rely on and compete for.  The development of digital RF technology is fueled by the same motivation that drives the development of wired communications; to deliver more (or better quality) content while using less bandwidth.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2014, 11:47:47 am by Jason Glass »
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Wireless Workbench Question
« Reply #12 on: April 30, 2014, 09:08:35 pm »


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