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Author Topic: 1970 suit case powered mixer  (Read 23194 times)

Ivan Beaver

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Re: 1970 suit case powered mixer
« Reply #30 on: April 19, 2015, 07:44:59 pm »

Built several Dynacos and Tigers. Like some of us, they were a stepping stone to bigger things.
I always wanted an "Ampzilla"

I would love to add one of those to my collection of amps.
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Ivan Beaver
Danley Sound Labs

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Robert Patch

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Re: 1970 suit case powered mixer
« Reply #31 on: April 21, 2015, 08:18:16 pm »

I've got a pair of Leak TL/50 tube amps screwed into the bottom of a road case in the shed.  It's buried.  I haven't seen it for years.
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Steve M Smith

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Re: 1970 suit case powered mixer
« Reply #32 on: April 22, 2015, 01:33:28 am »

I've got a pair of Leak TL/50 tube amps screwed into the bottom of a road case in the shed.  It's buried.  I haven't seen it for years.


That must have been some landslide to bury the shed!


Steve.
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Scott Holtzman

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Re: 1970 suit case powered mixer
« Reply #33 on: April 22, 2015, 02:51:46 am »

Ivan,  do you know Jim Bongiorno's history

http://www.ampzilla2000.com/James_Bongiorno.html

He had his hand in many storied audiophile designs.

Personally I would love to have a Thaedra preamp in my collection.  It was an interesting design.

The Ampzilla had an interesting industrial design and a cooling tunnel if I recall.  There was also a son and grandson IIRC.

This was the gear of my late youth though I was a Bob Carver fan from the PL400 days.  In college I got to see his first road trip with the cube.

Most kids had baseball cards I had vendor slicks and Absolute Sound,  or was it just Stereo Review back then?



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Scott AKA "Skyking" Holtzman
River Delta Audio is now:

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Ivan Beaver

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Re: 1970 suit case powered mixer
« Reply #34 on: April 22, 2015, 07:43:54 am »

Ivan,  do you know Jim Bongiorno's history

http://www.ampzilla2000.com/James_Bongiorno.html

He had his hand in many storied audiophile designs.

Personally I would love to have a Thaedra preamp in my collection.  It was an interesting design.

The Ampzilla had an interesting industrial design and a cooling tunnel if I recall.  There was also a son and grandson IIRC.

This was the gear of my late youth though I was a Bob Carver fan from the PL400 days.  In college I got to see his first road trip with the cube.

Most kids had baseball cards I had vendor slicks and Absolute Sound,  or was it just Stereo Review back then?
Yes there was a son and a grandson of ampzilla.  But the look of Ampzilla was the coolest.

My first Carver amp was "the cube".  I picked it up at a pawn shop and used it with my PA at the time.

I ended up using lots of PM1.5s a few years later for regular rental stock. 

They had horrible pin 1 problems.  Of course it wasn't until years later that I learned about pin 1 problems.

It sure would have made life easier if I had know about it back then--------

I used to trace hums/buzzes for sometimes hours, and often just to reduce it.  Take care of the pin 1 problem and they work much better.
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Ivan Beaver
Danley Sound Labs

PHYSICS- NOT FADS!

Tom Roche

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Re: 1970 suit case powered mixer
« Reply #35 on: June 02, 2015, 07:35:49 pm »

Most kids had baseball cards I had vendor slicks and Absolute Sound,  or was it just Stereo Review back then?

It could have been either or both.  I subscribed to Stereo Review, though got tired of every Julian Hirsch review sounding the same ... all glowing reviews!  I suppose it's bad business to bite the hand that feeds you.

Audio: 1947 - 2000
The Absolute Sound: 1973 - current
High Fidelity: 1951 - 1989
Stereo Review (started under different name):  1958 - 2000; currently called Sound & Vision

I can't help but think I'm forgetting another hi-fi magazine (published in the U.S.).
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Stephen Kirby

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Re: 1970 suit case powered mixer
« Reply #36 on: June 04, 2015, 01:44:59 pm »

Tom, are you thinking of Stereophile?  Formerly edited by Robert Harley who's now at TAS after HP's departure.

Now like the old Audio, you can find these at the grocery store newstand.  Unlike the old days when both were underground and only esoteric. 
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Tom Roche

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Re: 1970 suit case powered mixer
« Reply #37 on: June 04, 2015, 05:48:58 pm »

Tom, are you thinking of Stereophile?  Formerly edited by Robert Harley who's now at TAS after HP's departure.

Now like the old Audio, you can find these at the grocery store newstand.  Unlike the old days when both were underground and only esoteric.

YES, that's the one!  Thanks.  Wasn't Stereophile's staff known for being inordinately snobbish?
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Stephen Kirby

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Re: 1970 suit case powered mixer
« Reply #38 on: June 09, 2015, 06:47:13 pm »

When I stumbled into high end audio in the late '70s I thought that what I saw in High Fidelity and Audio was the high end.  But the true high end was very underground and had it's own snobbishness.  They deliberately hid their shops in dental office buildings and such to avoid the common riff-raff.  There was some cross pollination between TAS and Stereophile in the '90s.  TAS was always a little further out due to Pearson's dominance.  But he was really mostly about the music.  Stereophile seemed to me to adopt the esoteric snobbishness to keep up.  They they did an about face and went mass market.  And folks started jumping between and even writing for both.  And a few really went out on limbs with ebony hockey pucks and the like.  I used to go to the Stereophile shows when they came to SF but that whole scene has gone expensive mass market and isn't about the music anymore.  I heard so much harsh bombastic sound at the last one I went to I've never been back.
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: 1970 suit case powered mixer
« Reply #39 on: June 09, 2015, 07:59:34 pm »

When I stumbled into high end audio in the late '70s I thought that what I saw in High Fidelity and Audio was the high end.  But the true high end was very underground and had it's own snobbishness.  They deliberately hid their shops in dental office buildings and such to avoid the common riff-raff.  There was some cross pollination between TAS and Stereophile in the '90s.  TAS was always a little further out due to Pearson's dominance.  But he was really mostly about the music.  Stereophile seemed to me to adopt the esoteric snobbishness to keep up.  They they did an about face and went mass market.  And folks started jumping between and even writing for both.  And a few really went out on limbs with ebony hockey pucks and the like.  I used to go to the Stereophile shows when they came to SF but that whole scene has gone expensive mass market and isn't about the music anymore.  I heard so much harsh bombastic sound at the last one I went to I've never been back.
The Absolute Sound was more like a lunatic fringe, but served as comic relief with some of the advice (like tune your TV set between stations and other such nonsense.). Stereophile was relatively more grounded compared to TAS but still far from a scientific journal. The mainstream magazines were dismissed as being rubber stamps for the manufacturers but most mainstream product was already decent by then, and claims of large sonic differences were more a matter of exaggeration for effect.

My biggest criticism of the audiophool rags was they routinely featured reviews where a small handful of writers tested various review units by substituting them into their "reference" system, but contrary to the term there was nothing remotely reference quality about those systems or listening rooms.  The more esoteric the gear, the more random or chance the review results, unless you happened to be drinking the same kool-aid and using the same esoteric reference components to balance out the sundry family colorations.

I literally had the exact same review unit, receive two wildly different reviews from two different reviewers (with their two different reference systems). I am confident that my unit behaved the same both times, so draw your own conclusions. I suspect the guy who didn't like the sound was using crap components for the rest of his system. (Coincidentally it was a well known reviewer from Strereophile who gave me the good review). 

About then I decided to escape from that market since there was no linear cause and effect between product value and sales success. The thing i liked about large scale sound reinforcement is that it's hard to BS an auditorium full of listeners. The laws of physics tend to sort out the fakers. 

JR

PS There were a handful of even smaller audio-phool magazines that were even more unreliable. 
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Re: 1970 suit case powered mixer
« Reply #39 on: June 09, 2015, 07:59:34 pm »


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