ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Down

Author Topic: If you don't know, just check You Tube.  (Read 10895 times)

Frank DeWitt

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1010
    • LBP DI Box
If you don't know, just check You Tube.
« on: December 26, 2013, 10:48:49 PM »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5ol5XKjKQo#t=328

Connect the hot to the silver screw, and the neutral to the brass screw and the ground to something.

Gulp.

Logged
Not to Code

Mike Sokol

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3361
  • Lead instructor for the No~Shock~Zone
    • No~Shock~Zone Electrical Safety
Re: If you don't know, just check You Tube.
« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2013, 12:09:00 AM »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5ol5XKjKQo#t=328

Connect the hot to the silver screw, and the neutral to the brass screw and the ground to something.

Gulp.

And I wasted all those years studying electrical engineering... Who knew you didn't have to keep track of the wire or screw colors?  ???

Here's another one where he's more interested in the colors of the wall plate than the actual safety ground. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnGERqjgrzA

When I first started writing about RPBG wiring (Reverse Polarity Bootleg Grounds) the test gear manufacturers had the gall to ask me how they could happen. These guys are proof of just how dangerous the DIY movement can be without proper training. Yikes!!!
Logged
Mike Sokol
mike@noshockzone.org
www.NoShockZone.org

Ray Aberle

  • Classic LAB
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3446
  • Located in Vancouver, WA (and serves OR-WA-ID-BC)
    • Kelcema Audio
Re: If you don't know, just check You Tube.
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2013, 02:30:55 PM »

And I wasted all those years studying electrical engineering... Who knew you didn't have to keep track of the wire or screw colors?  ???

Here's another one where he's more interested in the colors of the wall plate than the actual safety ground. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnGERqjgrzA

When I first started writing about RPBG wiring (Reverse Polarity Bootleg Grounds) the test gear manufacturers had the gall to ask me how they could happen. These guys are proof of just how dangerous the DIY movement can be without proper training. Yikes!!!
Haha, yeah, "crimp connectors, I don't know if I will need them." And the wire nuts also have some white colored ones that will match your plate covers! Woo hoo! Appears that he intends to ground the plug to the outlet box. Hoping that it's metal, of course...

People must be watching this idiocy, though.
Logged
Kelcema Audio
Regional - Serving Pacific Northwest (OR, WA, ID, BC)

Tim McCulloch

  • SR Forums
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 22198
  • Wichita, Kansas USA
Re: If you don't know, just check You Tube.
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2013, 02:40:18 PM »

Haha, yeah, "crimp connectors, I don't know if I will need them." And the wire nuts also have some white colored ones that will match your plate covers! Woo hoo! Appears that he intends to ground the plug to the outlet box. Hoping that it's metal, of course...

People must be watching this idiocy, though.

I think a response to that video is in order:

"If you do electrical work based on this video, please leave it on screen so your survivors know who to sue when you get electrocuted or your house burns down."
Logged
"Practicing an art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow, for heaven's sake. Sing in the shower. Dance to the radio. Tell stories. Write a poem to a friend, even a lousy poem. Do it as well as you possible can. You will get an enormous reward. You will have created something."  - Kurt Vonnegut

Mike Sokol

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3361
  • Lead instructor for the No~Shock~Zone
    • No~Shock~Zone Electrical Safety
Re: If you don't know, just check You Tube.
« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2013, 04:45:50 PM »

I think a response to that video is in order:

"If you do electrical work based on this video, please leave it on screen so your survivors know who to sue when you get electrocuted or your house burns down."

Ha!  :o

When I was a young EE  back in the 70's you could only purchase electrical panel boxes and circuit breakers if you had some sort of electrical license. Just that fact is one of the reasons I went for my Master Electricians License. I could simply flash my electricians card and buy anything I wanted at the electrical distributors. Nowadays, anybody can buy anything they want at any big box store up to and including service panels and j-boxes as long as they have cash or a credit card. I'm pretty sure that 99% of the customers buying these electrical parts at Lowes and Home Depot are not qualified to install or test any of it. I'm sure they will YouTube these same videos just to make sure they have the right color wall plates and wire nuts.

I never knew the wire nut color needed to match the wall plate color either. I must have slept through that class.

I don't have the time, but somebody should be searching YouTube for this sort of garbage and calling them out. They're going to get somebody killed.
« Last Edit: December 27, 2013, 04:49:16 PM by Mike Sokol »
Logged
Mike Sokol
mike@noshockzone.org
www.NoShockZone.org

Mike Sokol

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3361
  • Lead instructor for the No~Shock~Zone
    • No~Shock~Zone Electrical Safety
Re: If you don't know, just check You Tube.
« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2013, 05:49:09 PM »

Frank: What a great thread...  ;D

If any of you see stupid YouTube videos about electrical wiring, please post them here.
Logged
Mike Sokol
mike@noshockzone.org
www.NoShockZone.org

Frank DeWitt

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1010
    • LBP DI Box
Re: If you don't know, just check You Tube.
« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2013, 06:08:54 PM »

Frank: What a great thread...  ;D

If any of you see stupid YouTube videos about electrical wiring, please post them here.

What struck me about this is that I know enough about this subject to have completely wired two houses (Both my own) but because I am not a professional I would never consider giving advice or making a you tube video on the subject.  I just installed a carillon system in a local church including some extensive wiring to the speakers in the steeple but I told them they needed to have a electrician install a new outlet and gave them a name.  There was a J box above the suspended ceiling tiles 5 ft from where I needed an outlet and it looked new enough to trust it but  just don't do that.  Instead some guy that doesn't know the hot from the ground makes the you tube.  BTW did anyone spot the guy that said the old ungrounded outlet was installed upside down because it had the wide slot on the right?  He held up a grounded outlet in the smile face orientation to show that the wide slot should be on the left.
Logged
Not to Code

Mike Sokol

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3361
  • Lead instructor for the No~Shock~Zone
    • No~Shock~Zone Electrical Safety
Re: If you don't know, just check You Tube.
« Reply #7 on: December 27, 2013, 06:52:17 PM »

BTW did anyone spot the guy that said the old ungrounded outlet was installed upside down because it had the wide slot on the right?  He held up a grounded outlet in the smile face orientation to show that the wide slot should be on the left.

These guys fixate on unimportant details like the color of the wire nuts or orientation of the outlet.  The orientation of the receptacle (ground hole top or bottom) isn't specifically established by the NEC. In fact, there's been an ongoing discussion that orienting receptacles with the ground contact on the top might be safer, considering that a metal outlet cover with a lost screw would fall down on the ground pin, and not short across the hot and neutral blades of the plug. Don't know if there's been a consensus in the 2014 code release, but I'll take a look when I a get a copy. 

Too much fun!  8)
Logged
Mike Sokol
mike@noshockzone.org
www.NoShockZone.org

Jonathan Johnson

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3161
  • Southwest Washington (state, not DC)
Re: If you don't know, just check You Tube.
« Reply #8 on: December 27, 2013, 07:15:25 PM »

In fact, there's been an ongoing discussion that orienting receptacles with the ground contact on the top might be safer, considering that a metal outlet cover with a lost screw would fall down on the ground pin, and not short across the hot and neutral blades of the plug.

At the risk of bringing up that debate here...

I think having the ground pin at the top is only marginally safer and any sense of security is misguided. When the plate falls off the receptacle and lands on the ground pin, there's a high likelihood that it will still come in contact with the hot pin as it swings around. If you're worried, put some removable threadlocker on the screw. Plus, it doesn't do any good if you've plugged in a 2-prong plug. The best, most logical argument I've found for placing the ground pin down is because the wife likes it that way.

I remember an incident when I was a child. In my parents' bedroom, the bedside lamp was plugged in a few feet away, so the cord was hanging in the air between the receptacle and the lamp. There were a number of metal coat hangers on the floor. I was idly playing, hanging the coat hangers on that wire, evenly spaced. The last space was to hang one on the plug. The coat hanger slipped between the plug and the receptacle and POW! (I wasn't shocked, but it kind of scared me.)

As the lamp had a 2-prong cord, it wouldn't have mattered which way the ground pin was oriented, up or down. (For that matter, orienting it sideways with neutral on top might've been a little better, but hardly safer.) My memory cells are picturing a 2-prong, ungrounded receptacle there.

That highlights a flaw in northwestern-half-hemisphere (what do you call half a hemisphere?) electrical design: a plug partially removed exposes live electrical contacts. Were the receptacle recessed, or the prongs equipped with spring-loaded, retractable covers, that hazard would be minimized. I believe many European receptacles are recessed now.

Nearly every refrigerator I've seen has a right angle plug, with the ground pin opposite the side of the plug where the cord enters. Therefore, refrigerator receptacles should be installed ground pin up to relieve strain on the cord. But not every right-angle plug has the ground pin so oriented; so it's probably best to orient the receptacle whichever direction results in the least strain on the cord. (As if you can predict that. There are doubtless refrigerators out there with the ground pin on the same side as the cord.)
« Last Edit: December 27, 2013, 07:20:36 PM by Jonathan Johnson »
Logged
Stop confusing the issue with facts and logic!

Jonathan Johnson

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3161
  • Southwest Washington (state, not DC)
Re: If you don't know, just check You Tube.
« Reply #9 on: December 27, 2013, 07:31:58 PM »

If any of you see stupid YouTube videos about electrical wiring, please post them here.

Not videos, but go to ashireporter.org, then click on "Past Issues", select an issue, then "Postcards from the Field."
Logged
Stop confusing the issue with facts and logic!

ProSoundWeb Community

Re: If you don't know, just check You Tube.
« Reply #9 on: December 27, 2013, 07:31:58 PM »


Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Up
 



Site Hosted By Ashdown Technologies, Inc.

Page created in 0.082 seconds with 22 queries.