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Author Topic: Power Outlets Worldwide  (Read 16041 times)

Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Power Outlets Worldwide
« Reply #10 on: December 24, 2013, 02:16:19 pm »

What do you do for electric stoves, ranges, or whatever they're called there?  Or does everybody use gas?  Or coal  :D ?

Until the NEMA 14-50 came into wide use in my part of Canada (sometime in the '80s?), kitchen stoves were tied into a pigtail coming out of the wall.  If you moved house, and were taking the stove with you, you disconnected and tied it in yourself.  It was good practice for a future career in Rock 'n' Roll.  ;)

GTD

In the United States, wall-mounted ovens, inset cooktops, and mounted ranges are hard-wired. Slide-in (aka freestanding) ranges are cord-and-plug connected. As a general rule, any appliance that is not fastened to the structure is considered movable and may be connected via cord-and-plug.
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Steve M Smith

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Re: Power Outlets Worldwide
« Reply #11 on: December 24, 2013, 03:00:59 pm »

Electric ovens are permanently wired in via isolating switches.

Actually, there is an exception to that rule.  When the hob and oven are separate units, they are often connected with our standard 13 amp plugs and sockets.

At my last house we had an electric oven and a gas hob.  Quite a common arrangement.


Steve.
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Mike Sokol

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Re: Power Outlets Worldwide
« Reply #12 on: December 24, 2013, 03:22:18 pm »

At my last house we had an electric oven and a gas hob.  Quite a common arrangement.

What exactly is a "hob"? That's a new term for me.
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: Power Outlets Worldwide
« Reply #13 on: December 24, 2013, 03:42:12 pm »

What exactly is a "hob"? That's a new term for me.

A gas cooktop, meant for permanent install without an attached oven.

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Mike Sokol

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Re: Power Outlets Worldwide
« Reply #14 on: December 24, 2013, 04:15:27 pm »

A gas cooktop, meant for permanent install without an attached oven.



Very cool. I have exactly the same thing in my house with an electric oven that "required" a 4-wire 120/240-volt hard-wired connection (no plug allowed per the installation instructions) and a gas cooktop/hob with an 15-amp Edison plug to power its ignition spark gadget.   
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: Power Outlets Worldwide
« Reply #15 on: December 24, 2013, 04:39:48 pm »

Do a google image search for "gas hob".  There are some really cool designs.
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Steve M Smith

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Re: Power Outlets Worldwide
« Reply #16 on: December 24, 2013, 05:30:46 pm »

A gas cooktop, meant for permanent install without an attached oven.

Or electric.



What exactly is a "hob"? That's a new term for me.

You Americans should learn English!

Very cool. I have exactly the same thing in my house with an electric oven that "required" a 4-wire 120/240-volt hard-wired connection (no plug allowed per the installation instructions)

The smaller electric ovens we have here will operate as an oven or a grill but not both at the same time.  Therefore they can run at 3kW with a normal 240 volt 13 amp plug.  The larger ovens with separate grill or double ovens require a higher rated hard wired installation.


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« Last Edit: December 24, 2013, 05:41:59 pm by Steve M Smith »
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Mike Sokol

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Re: Power Outlets Worldwide
« Reply #17 on: December 24, 2013, 09:27:34 pm »

Now here's something a little confusing from my side of the pond...

While the 3-wire 30-amp dryer outlet in the US is wired for 240-volts, we have a TT-30 (Travel Trailer) receptacle for our Recreational Vehicles that's very similar in size and form factor, but which is wired for 120-volts instead. What occasionally happens is that a homeowner pays an electrician to hook up a 30-amp/120-volt outlet on the side of the house to power his trailer in the driveway, and since a TT-30 looks a lot like a 30-amp/240-volt dryer receptacle that's what the electrician wires it for. Now plugging your $100,000 (or more) RV's 120-volt electrical system into a 240-volt power source generally destroys most of the electronics in seconds. See my article on this confusing problem at http://www.noshockzone.org/accidentally-plugging-into-240-volt-outlet/
 
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Tom Bourke

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Re: Power Outlets Worldwide
« Reply #18 on: December 25, 2013, 12:24:07 am »

What occasionally happens is that a homeowner pays an electrician to hook up a 30-amp/120-volt outlet on the side of the house to power his trailer in the driveway, and since a TT-30 looks a lot like a 30-amp/240-volt dryer receptacle that's what the electrician wires it for.
That's just negligence at best, incompetence at worst.  Hell, the voltage is written on the face of many outlets. That is also why we measure, even if it was put in by an "electrician".
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Steve M Smith

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Re: Power Outlets Worldwide
« Reply #19 on: December 25, 2013, 03:33:32 am »

You definitely have too many outlets and voltages!

How is the combined 120/240 dryer supply used?  120 for control circuits and 240 for heater elements?   If so, why not run it all on 240?


Steve.
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Re: Power Outlets Worldwide
« Reply #19 on: December 25, 2013, 03:33:32 am »


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