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Author Topic: Voltage limiting questions  (Read 8610 times)

Brian Jojade

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Re: Voltage limiting questions
« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2013, 11:46:54 am »

IOW, bring more than enough rig for the gig ;-)

Exactly.  Either you budget now for more gear and it works flawlessly, or you go cheap and bring barely enough and budget for repairs down the road.
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Keith Farmer

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Re: Voltage limiting questions
« Reply #11 on: October 18, 2013, 03:46:22 am »

A simple case of Ohms Law

RMS Voltage limit = Squart(RMS Power limit W * Nominal Impedance)
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Ivan Beaver

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Re: Voltage limiting questions
« Reply #12 on: October 18, 2013, 07:32:02 am »

A simple case of Ohms Law

RMS Voltage limit = Squart(RMS Power limit W * Nominal Impedance)
That works if loudspeakers were lightbulbs.

But since they are not-and the input voltage is very dynamic-it get a lot more complicated.

Yes that would give a "basic" answer", but not one that I would want to "stand behind" and say for sure "this is where you set it".

I have been doing a lot of "research" on limiting-how to set it up-how to easily measure where to set it and so forth.

I am writing a paper that should give some insights on "my" thoughts/procedures etc-but it is not done yet.

But let's just say that my "attitudes" have changed over the last couple of months-a good bit.

I don't want to go into it now-but the "proper procedure" (so far as my testing has lead me this far) is a good bit different than what I did/recommended in the past.

Until I am more "sure" I don't want to say anything as it is not "finalized".
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Ivan Beaver
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Ed Walters

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Re: Voltage limiting questions
« Reply #13 on: October 18, 2013, 11:40:00 am »

That works if loudspeakers were lightbulbs.

Well, in a way they are -- their cold resistance is lower than their hot resistance, and along with that comes power compression and all that jazz.

I bet you could make the case for having peak limiting points increase as the average thermal limit is approached -- the coil/motor could probably stand the highest peak drive voltage without mechanical damage just before the average level has melted/burned the coil...

Ed Walters
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Ivan Beaver

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Re: Voltage limiting questions
« Reply #14 on: October 18, 2013, 07:12:09 pm »

Well, in a way they are -- their cold resistance is lower than their hot resistance, and along with that comes power compression and all that jazz.

I bet you could make the case for having peak limiting points increase as the average thermal limit is approached -- the coil/motor could probably stand the highest peak drive voltage without mechanical damage just before the average level has melted/burned the coil...

Ed Walters
I was talking about the fact that light bulbs have a "generally" constant voltage applied to them-so the wattage is constant.

Loudsepakers are not even close to having a constant voltage applied to them.  So the "wattage" is all over the place and FAR from constant.
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Charlie Zureki

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Re: Voltage limiting questions
« Reply #15 on: October 18, 2013, 08:02:01 pm »

I was talking about the fact that light bulbs have a "generally" constant voltage applied to them-so the wattage is constant.

Loudsepakers are not even close to having a constant voltage applied to them.  So the "wattage" is all over the place and FAR from constant.

  +1  Hammer
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Voltage limiting questions
« Reply #15 on: October 18, 2013, 08:02:01 pm »


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