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Author Topic: Vocal microphones  (Read 64158 times)

john lutz

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Re: Vocal microphones
« Reply #140 on: November 19, 2018, 05:06:25 pm »

Lewitt AMS-MTP-550-DM

Give this guy a try, I think it will surprise you. Not just for the price - it is remarkably clear, smooth, and transparent. Great GBF and low handeling noise too.
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Tim Hite

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Re: Vocal microphones
« Reply #141 on: November 25, 2018, 01:02:24 pm »

Regarding e835 vs e935, there is a world of difference between the two. The e935 has much more detail and clarity. Recently A/B'ed them during a jam session and the choice was unanimous for the 935 being the better sounding mic.




OK I'm changing my opinions lol.

- I'm now used to the Beta 87a's and I can work with them.
- I'm still happy with SM58's and SM86's, but prefer 86's if given the choice of the three.
- I'm now disliking the e835, very boxy sounding/muddy imo, could be just me.
So is the e935 that much different? Is it like the Beta58a to the SM58?Anyone got opinions with e865 also?
« Last Edit: November 26, 2018, 12:59:25 pm by Tim Hite »
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Scott Slater

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Re: Vocal microphones
« Reply #142 on: November 26, 2018, 07:51:03 am »

I'm looking into some Beta 87a's for a annual bluegrass festival that I work.  Some of the bands have really poor mic technique, or want to sit several feet away from the vocal mic.  Even after our stage tech moves it up where it should be, they move it back.  Most aren't this extreme but many seem to want to sing a foot or so away from the mic.  We currently use Beta 58a's for the vocals, and SM81's for the instruments.

Do the Beta 87a's work well with wedges, or is it more of a mic for bands using in-ear monitoring?  I don't want to buy 6 of them, only to find them not usable in this situation.
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Geert Friedhof

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Re: Vocal microphones
« Reply #143 on: November 26, 2018, 09:21:29 am »

Regarding b87a on monitors: I have several, and i find them quite easy goin' on d&b max15 and RCF TT25 CXA. As with all hypers you should place the monitor(s) on a 60 degree angle to the mic. I find the b87a a very good 'budget' condensor. It's my goto for female voices. You do need an HPF though. Also wind noise can be a problem. It is still a hypercardiod, so a big proximity effect. Maybe the b87c is the better option here, but i am sure ( ;) there are better options for your intended use.

Regarding the 935: After several gigs i am still not convinced it is a better mic than a b58, especially with 'screamers'. It is (a lot) better than the 835, but still has a sort of smiley face freq response. Take out some hf, and it sounds dull. Take out some lf, and it sounds thin. This makes it hard on dynamic performances imho.
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Caleb Dueck

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Re: Vocal microphones
« Reply #144 on: November 27, 2018, 11:18:26 pm »

Try SM86's instead of B87's, at least one.  I prefer them, and they happen to cost less.

Dynamic mics - very much a personal preference.  I like E935's better than most other dynamic mics, and much better than the Shure options.  The Shure models just seem so muddy time-domain-wise.

Sent from my VS980 4G using Tapatalk

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Tim McCulloch

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Re: Vocal microphones
« Reply #145 on: November 30, 2018, 11:29:11 am »

Try SM86's instead of B87's, at least one.  I prefer them, and they happen to cost less.

Another vote for the SM86.  I own 6 of them expressly for bluegrass/folk/acoustic events.

I auditioned all of the 87 variations and like the 86 the best.  I abhor Beta Everything with the exception of the Beta57a.  I own Beta52 because they're on riders.  The rest sound odd to me and frequently harsh, brittle or 'crunchy' (with or without ketchup, Brian!).
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Steven Eudaly

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Re: Vocal microphones
« Reply #146 on: March 04, 2019, 07:00:51 pm »

Third vote for SM86.

Had some cheap PG wireless kits with SM86 heads primarily for wedding rentals and was always impressed with how good they sounded even when the source was way off axis (re: poor mic technique).

Chris Grimshaw

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Re: Vocal microphones
« Reply #147 on: March 05, 2019, 04:13:06 am »

Regarding the 935: After several gigs i am still not convinced it is a better mic than a b58, especially with 'screamers'. It is (a lot) better than the 835, but still has a sort of smiley face freq response. Take out some hf, and it sounds dull. Take out some lf, and it sounds thin. This makes it hard on dynamic performances imho.

I find the Beta-58a drops off very quickly as you move off-axis. A lot of the musicians I work with sing while playing an instrument, so it's good to have a mic where they can move around a bit, and still get decent sound. The e935 does pretty well for that.
I see what you mean about a smiley-face EQ on the 935. Try a wide boost of a few dB around 800Hz. It fills in the middle a little.


Recently I picked up a few Beyer MC930s, and I really like them. A TG-X930 came up online for reasonable money. Same capsule, similar circuitry (just optimised for close-up vocal use), and it's my current favourite vocal mic. Sounds great, and behaves well off-axis - sounds the same, just gets quieter.

I do some recording work between gigs (improves ROI - there's a useful amount of overlap), and the 930 range is always first on the stand, and they usually stay there.

Chris
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lindsay Dean

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Re: Vocal microphones
« Reply #148 on: March 05, 2019, 02:46:29 pm »

As far as vocal use
One of my band mates came in this weekend with a senn 935, it just sounds like a bright flatter sm58, not impressed.

The Senn 835 sounds very much like an sm58 but with less proximity.
 My current favorite Mic of all is the sm86.
 The sm87a Sounds almost duplicate, but it's much better on loud stages (as long as you stay on it).
     My favorite Mic of all time is the Electro Voice Bk-1. I picked up used on a whim from a local sound engineer.
I was pleasantly surprised. It's response is warm and natural very similar to the sm86.
 
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Mark Scrivener

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Re: Vocal microphones
« Reply #149 on: March 30, 2019, 11:35:56 pm »

Another vote for the SM86.  I own 6 of them expressly for bluegrass/folk/acoustic events.

I auditioned all of the 87 variations and like the 86 the best.  I abhor Beta Everything with the exception of the Beta57a.  I own Beta52 because they're on riders.  The rest sound odd to me and frequently harsh, brittle or 'crunchy' (with or without ketchup, Brian!).

Love the SM86.....even works as a decent instrument mic in a pinch.
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