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Author Topic: Good brands vs bad brands  (Read 9634 times)

Paul Dershem

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Re: Good brands vs bad brands
« Reply #20 on: July 09, 2013, 12:12:47 am »

I do most of my sound reinforcement work alone so I travel as light as possible. For simple "fuller sound" type situations, I use (2) of these 10" bandpass subs.

http://www.tobyspeakers.com/index.php?dispatch=products.view&product_id=29789

I've actually used them on a number of church installs where there wasn't a rock band to support. I order them with an Neutrik NL4 SpeakOn connector instead of the standard terminal cup.  Huge amount of low end for the cabinet size (L=24,W=13, H=11.75). Requires very little power due to it's efficiency (160 watts RMS). Since they come standard as bare MDF, they can be painted to match the carpet, wall, etc... if they don't ultimately work under the stage.

$520 for (2) of them plus shipping.

ra byn (robin)


That looks like something that could work well to fill out the bottom on "acoustic" gigs, folk, bluegrass, jazz trios and big bands etc.

Please tell me more about your experience with them. :)
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ra byn taylor

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Re: Good brands vs bad brands
« Reply #21 on: July 09, 2013, 07:40:40 pm »


That looks like something that could work well to fill out the bottom on "acoustic" gigs, folk, bluegrass, jazz trios and big bands etc.

Please tell me more about your experience with them. :)

Literally all the types of gigs you mentioned above I've covered with (2) TOBY Sheriff subs covering LF.

I've used them outdoors for medium SPL gigs like dance concerts & such. Whether they're able to get loud enough for X gig depends on what you're trying to do of course. Past a certain SPL point, I bring my 18" sub cabinets but for just adding some low end to an small outdoor PA, the Sheriff's work fine. I don't always have the space to take my larger subs & most of the time, large subs are overkill for the type of gigs I do.

I've used a sheriff for adding some thump to a drum wedge. I've run them without any LP/HP filters when I didn't have a DSP device with me. The box rolls off mechanically pretty fast after about 100hz. They do sound better processed though.

For it's size & weight, I haven't come across anything that has the same output for the wattage in or the cost. I can physically carry (2) at a time without much effort via their ports. (2) will easily fill in my front seat, back seat, trunk, etc...

I have a pair of the carpet covered version & a pair of the black painted version. The carpeted version holds up best to wear & tear but outdoors the carpet gets grass stuck in it so I put a mat down.

There is a frequency response chart on the website if you're the type that likes that sort of data. It's under vehicle subwoofers / bandpass enclosures / sheriff single 10"/ images / view larger image.

I'm probably the only person using them for pro audio but for all the installs they are on : (2) small churches, (1) small live theater, (1) arts center, they just work & I've never had a failure or issue. If you decide to get some, just make sure you ask for them to put an NL4 Speakon connector on them instead of the stock cup unless you prefer banana plug type connections. Maybe even (2) if you plan on running them off one amp channel. I have the dual voice coil versions which will allow for combining them in different ways although I always just run one per amp channel. With (2) 4 ohm voice coils, you can wire the voice coils inside the cabinet for 8 ohms (what I do) or run them @ 2 ohms. The single voice coil version is 4 ohms & I liked the idea of having some options so I went with the DVC version at the time. Not sure if that was the best decision or not but I have plenty of power amps & figured 8 ohm loads would be cleaner. If you're not a tinkerer, a single 4 ohm load might be the ticket. The added bonus to the Sheriff is that it's small enough to be used in places where a larger sub might not be. Like a living room:)  One of the churches that has them just sticks them behind a large plant. 

If you have specific questions I haven't covered, write back.   

Best regards,

ra byn (robin)
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Paul Dershem

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Re: Good brands vs bad brands
« Reply #22 on: July 09, 2013, 09:11:58 pm »

Thanks! Very helpful. :)
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Good brands vs bad brands
« Reply #22 on: July 09, 2013, 09:11:58 pm »


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