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Author Topic: infinite hold spectrum  (Read 3369 times)

Dan Richardson

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infinite hold spectrum
« on: June 28, 2013, 03:16:54 pm »

I've been using SMAART in infinite hold spectrum mode (why isn't it actually infinite?) off the mixer solo bus to get a picture of the character of a particular input. There's a vocalist I've worked with for years who has a voice like a chainsaw. Finally got to try it on him. Hellooooo 3k.

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Riley Casey

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Re: infinite hold spectrum
« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2013, 08:37:12 pm »

Could be an interesting addition to the process of selecting / evaluating a vocal mic. Certainly help in distinguishing differences between raw frequency response and harder to measure characteristics like transient response.

Jason Lucas

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Re: infinite hold spectrum
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2013, 09:57:06 am »

While not quite as robust as the RTA in SMAART, the digital board I mix on has an RTA function and I've noticed our sennheiser mics have a big boost in the high end above 5K. So much so that I often cut a bit up there.
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Merlijn van Veen

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infinite hold spectrum
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2013, 01:13:28 pm »

Is this spectrum characteristic for all his singing styles? My artist has a similar signature, though slightly lower, when he starts to belt. In soft ballads or speech it's of no concern. Dynamic equalizing is IMHO very useful. If level isn't consistent over program, consider placing it on a group. This way you can instantaneously go over or under threshold by respectively pushing the input fader up and the group fader down or vice versa.

Dan Richardson

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Re: infinite hold spectrum
« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2013, 01:18:38 pm »

Is this spectrum characteristic for all his singing styles? My artist has a similar signature, though slightly lower, when he starts to belt. In soft ballads or speech it's of no concern. Dynamic equalizing is IMHO very useful. If level isn't consistent over program, consider placing it on a group. This way you can instantaneously go over or under threshold by respectively pushing the input fader up and the group fader down or vice versa.

I mult his channel to one that's hack EQ'd and has a multiband compressor inserted. The unprocessed one goes to monitors, and I mix the two to taste for FOH. It was just fun to see such clear confirmation of how deep my cuts had to be.
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Merlijn van Veen

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Re: infinite hold spectrum
« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2013, 03:13:33 pm »

I mult his channel to one that's hack EQ'd and has a multiband compressor inserted. The unprocessed one goes to monitors, and I mix the two to taste for FOH. It was just fun to see such clear confirmation of how deep my cuts had to be.

Out of curiosity, is this an all analog setup, digital or hybrid? I can imagine, depending on routing and signal processing, that under certain circumstances the processed channel might have some inherited latency? I've found i.e. minute differences on our Digico SD8 in order of a couple of hundredth milliseconds, depending on routing and (double) bussing. There are even differences between mono and stereo configurations. I'm very charmed though of the parallel approach.

Dan Richardson

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Re: infinite hold spectrum
« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2013, 03:23:42 pm »

Out of curiosity, is this an all analog setup, digital or hybrid? I can imagine, depending on routing and signal processing, that under certain circumstances the processed channel might have some inherited latency? I've found i.e. minute differences on our Digico SD8 in order of a couple of hundredth milliseconds, depending on routing and (double) bussing. There are even differences between mono and stereo configurations. I'm very charmed though of the parallel approach.

Yamaha LS/9. I actually have the same plug-in inserted in both channels, with the clean channel set so it never thresholds.
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Merlijn van Veen

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infinite hold spectrum
« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2013, 04:33:45 pm »

Clever thinking!

Adam Black

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Re: infinite hold spectrum
« Reply #8 on: July 02, 2013, 11:17:26 am »

I've been using SMAART in infinite hold spectrum mode (why isn't it actually infinite?)

Hey Dan,

Based on that screen shot, you aren't using an infinite hold, but rather an infinite average. A hold merely tracks peak level on a per bin basis. An average is, well an average. An infinite average simply means that the running average does not reset nor does it have any periodic decay built in. It's actually the most basic of averaging techniques. In essence, the average for each bin is the sum of all the contributors divided by the number of contributors.

-A
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Re: infinite hold spectrum
« Reply #8 on: July 02, 2013, 11:17:26 am »


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