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Author Topic: Specific frequency profiles for EDM genres  (Read 15582 times)

john manson

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Re: Specific frequency profiles for EDM genres
« Reply #10 on: March 14, 2011, 03:36:51 am »

Not exactly.  While there wasn't much to do at the gig-I spent a good amount of time watching the meters on the amps-which weren't anywhere near full output.

I had 2 sub systems in use-one that went from  20Hz to 40Hz and another that went from  30Hz to 80Hz.

Most of the time both systems were producing decent output, but during the deep sweeps, the meters on the 30-80Hz system would go completely off and the one on the 20-40Hz system were still working at the same level.

If the music was only going down to 40hz or even 30Hz, then both would be working all the time.  But a good number of times this was not the case.

Now maybe the specific type material I was doing was not normal (very likely as I have little to compare it to).

The last night I found a lounge area way off to the side and behind the stage with some comfy couches to take a nap.  I had to get up several times because I said to myself "My goodness what the &%#@ are they doing with the system"-because it felt like the building was going to come apart.  So I would get up and go look at the amps and they were just fine-coasting along.  But the deep freq were like nothing I have ever heard before.

It wasn't 40Hz by any stretch.

Ivan, what subs were you using and in what numbers for both the 20hz to 40hz and the 30hz to 80hz?

I've always thought about doing this but always wondered what kind of ratio to use. Also if I was normally using 12 srx712s would I split this and use 8 subs from 30hz to 80hz and 4 from 20hz to 40hz? Or would I keep 12 subs doing down to 30hz and find more for the 20hz to 40hz? Do you thing the srx712s would cut it down that low?

Thanks John
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Daniel Maki

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Re: Specific frequency profiles for EDM genres
« Reply #11 on: March 15, 2011, 10:20:47 pm »

Doug, that's pretty cool.
Want to try Drum n Bass? 

Pat Semeraro

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Re: Specific frequency profiles for EDM genres
« Reply #12 on: April 26, 2013, 08:29:14 pm »

Using a lossy compression internet stream is not the best reference.  Lossy codecs and broadcast processing both do a lot of "perceptive encoding"  based on the 80/20 principal to try and maximize both "loudness" (broadcast processing) and "quality" (codec processing).  Rolling off the lowest and highest frequencies makes room in the spectrum for other frequencies.  Analyzing the original track would give a better picture.

Mp3 is old news but still used for many internet radio streams.  This might make interesting reading.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MP3
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Doug Fowler

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Re: Specific frequency profiles for EDM genres
« Reply #13 on: April 27, 2013, 03:03:47 pm »

Using a lossy compression internet stream is not the best reference.  Lossy codecs and broadcast processing both do a lot of "perceptive encoding"  based on the 80/20 principal to try and maximize both "loudness" (broadcast processing) and "quality" (codec processing).  Rolling off the lowest and highest frequencies makes room in the spectrum for other frequencies.  Analyzing the original track would give a better picture.

Mp3 is old news but still used for many internet radio streams.  This might make interesting reading.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MP3

So you're saying my 8 hour average frequency profile would somehow be different if I had used a non-lossy source?

I don't need a better picture for this exercise, thanks though. 
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"It's got electrolytes.  It's got what plants crave."

John Roberts {JR}

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Re: Specific frequency profiles for EDM genres
« Reply #14 on: April 27, 2013, 05:45:52 pm »

There has been alot of talk both speculative and educated on this and other forums about the specific predominant frequencies that are used in the making of EDM tracks, eg basslines (synth or otherwise), kick (especially)!! and any other frequencies that are the focus in each style, (Trance,House,Hardhouse,Progressive,Hardcore,Dubstep).       

I would like to hear from anyone that has direct measurements (eg RTA ,Spectrum analyzer,Smarrt,maybe?))  of any of the aforementioned styles that can post these results for all to see so that we can once and for all see exactly what parts of the freq. spectrum that have the most concentrated energy.

I know that this has been posted before in the old Lab forum in small parts, but it would be nice to have a comprehensive listing of all types of EDM and even perhaps Reggae to enable current and new members to be able to gear their systems towards their music of choice thru the proper choice of loudspeaker alignment/processing.
Are there any current members that would like to contribute to this thread to help out? The main reason I ask is that I am a mobile DJ and I own all my equipment:Crown,Crest and Numark, but I also build my own speakers...subs/ mid-highs and it would be nice to be able to tune the subs for intended use eg. F3 of 25 hz for dubstep or flat response from 40-80 hz for the kick in a trance track..... maybe ,I don't know.
Thank you for any help you can give , hopefully it can clear up any questions I and others have.

It would be nice and many manufacturers would love to see accurate characterization of musical genres.

Amp designers want to know for PS and duty cycle matters. Speaker designers want to know for driver excursion and frequency range power handling concerns.

Perhaps some college student with too much time on his hands can scope a bunch of shows.

I suspect more than just a simple long term average, transient peaks, burst (x mSec), and then longer term averages, could be useful.

I am not holding my breath for neat, concise, complete, data.

JR
 
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Listen to what a properly "cleared" drum sounds like.   http://circularscience.com/
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