ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Antenna Cominer Question  (Read 151 times)

Jamin Lynch

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1982
  • Corpus Christi, TX.
Antenna Cominer Question
« on: May 26, 2022, 05:09:33 PM »

Could I use this passive antenna splitter/combiner for 2 Sennheiser wireless IEM units along with one paddle antenna instead of a powered antenna combiner system?

Thanks
« Last Edit: May 26, 2022, 05:12:57 PM by Jamin Lynch »
Logged

Paul Johnson

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 71
  • Currently - Lowestoft - UK
Re: Antenna Cominer Question
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2022, 05:33:31 PM »

Short answer - no. The thing with antenna combiners is that despite the IEM transmitters being quite low power, RF transmitters are quite sensitive to reflections coming back up the feeder from an antenna. VSWR is the ratio of of oomph going out compared to it coming back up. Normally, it's just less than ideal antenna systems that don't match well and produce this reflected power. In something like a Sennheiser combiner, each input connector is fed to a buffer stage before being combined, so this active buffer presents each transmitter with a constant proper load.

A passive splitter is a combiner too, so if you stick power into it, some of it will appear at the other input terminal. Some transmitters might not care, but others could be damaged. The buffer is pretty important. It might work, but it could produce some very strange results - possibly even odd mixing and spurious outputs. Transmitters need careful treatment.
Logged

Rui Lisboa

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 16
Re: Antenna Cominer Question
« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2022, 05:57:33 AM »

Short answer - no. The thing with antenna combiners is that despite the IEM transmitters being quite low power, RF transmitters are quite sensitive to reflections coming back up the feeder from an antenna. VSWR is the ratio of of oomph going out compared to it coming back up. Normally, it's just less than ideal antenna systems that don't match well and produce this reflected power. In something like a Sennheiser combiner, each input connector is fed to a buffer stage before being combined, so this active buffer presents each transmitter with a constant proper load.

A passive splitter is a combiner too, so if you stick power into it, some of it will appear at the other input terminal. Some transmitters might not care, but others could be damaged. The buffer is pretty important. It might work, but it could produce some very strange results - possibly even odd mixing and spurious outputs. Transmitters need careful treatment.

Excellent answer. Just to ad up this is a resistive combiner and not a Wilkinson divider so there is less isolation from port to port. A resistive unit usually has more insertion loss.
Still shure has one of these on their combiners upfront to link units. So Im guessing they might work ok. If a passive device should be used and you can bear with the inherent loss I would choose the mini circuits or similar wilkinson divider type.

Logged

Keith Broughton

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3599
  • Toronto
Re: Antenna Cominer Question
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2022, 06:56:29 AM »

Could I use this passive antenna splitter/combiner for 2 Sennheiser wireless IEM units along with one paddle antenna instead of a powered antenna combiner system?

Thanks
It would be better to just use 2 separate antennas.
This is a passive device and would not work well for what you want.
Logged
I don't care enough to be apathetic

ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Antenna Cominer Question
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2022, 06:56:29 AM »


Pages: [1]   Go Up
 



Site Hosted By Ashdown Technologies, Inc.

Page created in 0.03 seconds with 20 queries.