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Author Topic: Wireless Mic Clipping problem  (Read 10869 times)

Bob Nafzinger

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Re: Wireless Mic Clipping problem
« Reply #10 on: April 04, 2013, 03:49:50 pm »

Brian is right...(just wanted to emphasize this point.  If your microphone operates in the range between 698 Mhz and 802 Mhz, it is operating in a range that is no longer legal to operate wireless microphones)

We have the same issue and it's from iphones.  Once these frequencies were taken from our wireless systems it was given to Mobile Phone providers.  We put the receivers by the stage and then had less of a problem.  We also  put up a slide to ask people to "Turn off Phones"
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AllenDeneau

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Re: Wireless Mic Clipping problem
« Reply #11 on: April 05, 2013, 02:24:52 am »

Brian is right...(just wanted to emphasize this point.  If your microphone operates in the range between 698 Mhz and 802 Mhz, it is operating in a range that is no longer legal to operate wireless microphones)

We have the same issue and it's from iphones.  Once these frequencies were taken from our wireless systems it was given to Mobile Phone providers.  We put the receivers by the stage and then had less of a problem.  We also  put up a slide to ask people to "Turn off Phones"

It can't be stressed enough that not only is it difficult to use these frequencies, it is absolutely illegal and very costly WHEN they find you. Not saying that's the OP's problem but it deserves to be repeated.

As far as mobile phones being the issue, I really couldn't tell you. Part of that big block of frequencies that was sold by the FCC will/is going to mobile device usage BUT, it shouldn't be an issue, for now, because they're within their frequency range and we're not. NOW, RF interference and overall signal saturation and bombardment, that's a whole different story.

Anytime you can put the receivers within the area where the transmitters are located it's going to give you an optimal signal, as long as there's a good line of sight. When it comes to wireless, strongest signal wins and if your device and another device both put out 30mW but your transmitter is closer, you win..

Things can get tricky in Nashville, too.

Absolutely, fortunately it's not as bad as Chicago but it's still fun ;) especially when channel 5 has petitioned, and won, the right to up their power. When I moved here in 2011, my H5 frequency band was 100% clear, all of the sudden, I lost 2 presets as channel 5 got "more power, argh argh argh".

It is always fun to be in the Sears (Willis) Tower and try to use wireless, you can usually get one part of the room to work or another but rarely both since you're only 20' below 2 of the largest radio transmitters in North America... If you have powered speakers you can plug a 25', quality sheilded, XLR cable into the speaker and leave the other end unplugged, when you power it on you can literally lissten to B96 Radio :o

Drury Lane Theater was fun too. Serious wireless coordination necessary there too. 5 banquet rooms PLUS a theater just down the hallway, quite easy to lost a frequency once you power down.

Then there's Soldier Field during game day. Over 300 wireless units in play at any time. Once we're assigned a frequency, it's ours and our alone but sometimes finding a slot big enough for us can be a trip. NFL wireless frequency coordinator is a job I'd never want..

I haven't yet had that experience in Nashville yet, but I'm sure it's a possibility.
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Allen D.
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Wireless Mic Clipping problem
« Reply #11 on: April 05, 2013, 02:24:52 am »


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