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Author Topic: What is the difference between aux outputs and matrix outputs?  (Read 10343 times)

Craig Nuffer

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  We have a new sound board (Sound Craft GB4) and it has some outputs that I am not familiar with. Our old Carvin board had 4 monitor output that I use to feed stage monitors and a hearing impaired system. This new board has 2 sets of 4 aux outputs. (4 are switchable pre/post fader). There are also another 4 matrix outputs. What is the difference? Ultimately I am looking for the outputs that would best serve the monitors and hearing impaired systems.
  I've been doing this for a while, but the scope of what the church needs is fairly limited, so I don't get much chance to experiment with new things. Your help and expertise would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Craig
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Samuel Rees

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What is the difference between aux outputs and matrix outputs?
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2013, 07:31:28 pm »

Channels feed auxes, busses and auxes feed matrices. Matrices could be useful for your assisted listening system by sending your main outputs to it. That would leave all 8 auxes for monitors, FX, or aux-fed subs.
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Keith Broughton

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Re: What is the difference between aux outputs and matrix outputs?
« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2013, 07:38:38 am »

Channels feed auxes, busses and auxes feed matrices. Matrices could be useful for your assisted listening system by sending your main outputs to it. That would leave all 8 auxes for monitors, FX, or aux-fed subs.
AUX outputs are a separate output of an adjustable mix of the channels
MATRIX outputs are a separate output of an adjustable mix of groups, aux mixes and master outputs.

In your case, I would suggest using pre fade AUX mixes for stage monitor mix to the performers  that is not changed by the fader level .
An AUX mix in post fader mode for the mix to the hearing impaired. In that mix, you can raise the level of the pulpit and pastor mics and reduce the level of the band.
Hope this helps :)
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Bob L. Wilson

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Re: What is the difference between aux outputs and matrix outputs?
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2013, 01:54:23 pm »

AUX outputs are a separate output of an adjustable mix of the channels
MATRIX outputs are a separate output of an adjustable mix of groups, aux mixes and master outputs.

In your case, I would suggest using pre fade AUX mixes for stage monitor mix to the performers  that is not changed by the fader level .
An AUX mix in post fader mode for the mix to the hearing impaired. In that mix, you can raise the level of the pulpit and pastor mics and reduce the level of the band.
Hope this helps :)

Hearing assist and other room feeds work great on matrices. I start with a mono sum of the FOH then add enough additional spoken wordand lead vocal from the group sends to raise them about 6dB above the FOH mix.
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Brad Weber

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Re: What is the difference between aux outputs and matrix outputs?
« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2013, 07:22:40 am »

People seem to often have pretty fixed ideas on how to use matrix sends but I find that it often depends on how the matrix sources can be configured and if they will provide the signals and mix flexibility desired.

Monitors are almost always best served by pre-fade aux mixes as you typically want to be able to adjust the adjust the contribution of individual sources and avoid changes for the house mix affecting the monitor sends.  Assistive listening and some other mixes are not always as clear cut as to how they are best handled and have to be assessed based on the specific equipment, system configuration and goals involved.

On the GB4 the matrix sources are normally the left, center, right and four subgroup mix buses, although if you activate the group/aux swap they become the left, center, right and first four aux mix buses.  So in the normal operating mode the only matrix sources are the four groups and main mixes, no individual channel sources and thus a pretty limited mix flexibility.  That flexibility may be further limited by the fact that the groups are stereo pairs.

As an example of how this might affect your decision, I often incorporate some form of ambient room microphones into assistive listening, recording and some other mixes.  I also often want to include different amounts of sources heard acoustically in the space in recording, ALS, overflow, Cry Room, etc. mixes than I do in the house mix as those people do not hear any of the direct natural sound.   If I want to use a matrix mix for those purposes than it needs to provide the associated mix and routing flexibility.  Some mixers may support that via matrix outputs, but the GB4, at least in the normal operating mode, would not.
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BobWitte

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Re: What is the difference between aux outputs and matrix outputs?
« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2013, 03:49:00 pm »

On most mixers the channels you don't want in the house mix can be assigned to a group ONLY. That group should not be assigned to the main LR. Then add appropriate amounts of the group to the Matrix feed for adding the room mics etc. along with the main mix...  yes, it chews up a group. I assume the GB4 can handle this task.




People seem to often have pretty fixed ideas on how to use matrix sends but I find that it often depends on how the matrix sources can be configured and if they will provide the signals and mix flexibility desired.

Monitors are almost always best served by pre-fade aux mixes as you typically want to be able to adjust the adjust the contribution of individual sources and avoid changes for the house mix affecting the monitor sends.  Assistive listening and some other mixes are not always as clear cut as to how they are best handled and have to be assessed based on the specific equipment, system configuration and goals involved.

On the GB4 the matrix sources are normally the left, center, right and four subgroup mix buses, although if you activate the group/aux swap they become the left, center, right and first four aux mix buses.  So in the normal operating mode the only matrix sources are the four groups and main mixes, no individual channel sources and thus a pretty limited mix flexibility.  That flexibility may be further limited by the fact that the groups are stereo pairs.

As an example of how this might affect your decision, I often incorporate some form of ambient room microphones into assistive listening, recording and some other mixes.  I also often want to include different amounts of sources heard acoustically in the space in recording, ALS, overflow, Cry Room, etc. mixes than I do in the house mix as those people do not hear any of the direct natural sound.   If I want to use a matrix mix for those purposes than it needs to provide the associated mix and routing flexibility.  Some mixers may support that via matrix outputs, but the GB4, at least in the normal operating mode, would not.
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