ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5   Go Down

Author Topic: battery powered (pink) noise stick?  (Read 19117 times)

peter dakin

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 210
Re: battery powered (pink) noise stick?
« Reply #20 on: October 12, 2012, 10:33:05 am »

It is apparent that you missed the part about being battery powered ...... not phantom powered.

specs state "12Vdc - 48Vdc phantom power", and "when connected to 48v LED illuminates", doesn't say anywhere about a battery.. if it does have a battery, I'm all ears!

The European versions: http://www.optogate.com/html/testere.html all state 48v.
Logged

Jordan Wolf

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1368
  • Location: Collingswood, NJ
Re: battery powered (pink) noise stick?
« Reply #21 on: October 12, 2012, 11:15:52 am »

Peter,

I couldn't find any with a balanced output, but Markertek makes one that works on a 9V and uses a 1/4" TS output.  For those short distances you're testing at, you don't NEED a balanced line, do you?

You could also use a battery-powered phantom power adapter like this one with a Pink Stick to get you going…plus, they're handy to have around anyway.

EDIT: After listening to Dave Rat's video about his XLR sniffer, you can use the battery-powered side as a +12V DC supply.  Rational Acoustics' pink noise stick can operate on 12V, so it would be alright - especially for your uses.  Just add a wye cable and you're golden.  The only small downside is you're dealing with low dBu (-33) compared to pro line level, which the speakers are going to see.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2012, 11:42:06 am by Jordan Wolf »
Logged
Jordan Wolf
<><

"We want our sound to go into the soul of the audience, and see if it can awaken some little thing in their minds... Cause there are so many sleeping people." - Jimi Hendrix

Kent Thompson

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 293
Re: battery powered (pink) noise stick?
« Reply #22 on: October 12, 2012, 12:15:37 pm »

nvm not what I thought it was...
« Last Edit: October 12, 2012, 12:21:33 pm by Kent Thompson »
Logged

Tom Young

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 620
Re: battery powered (pink) noise stick?
« Reply #23 on: October 12, 2012, 12:50:57 pm »

Exactly.. when flying active speakers, such as Meyer boxes, you can have 40+ boxes flown in the air, all requiring power and all requiring signal.
Obviously you want to test each speaker, to ensure it is receiving power and signal, before been flown to "array height", motor cables put away and safety secured, which will generally have happened by the time you have your FOH/multi's ran out. I want a more streamlined device, without cables.
The 'noise-stick' by rational acoustics is exactly what I need, expect for requiring 48v. To get 48v will require cables and another device to supply power, which is more cumbersome than what I already have.

Maybe John Roberts can weigh-in on the viability of such a device. Is there an inherent obstacle to providing pink noise from a stick/tube package (that is able to be inserted into an XLR receptacle) in balanced form and powered by an internal battery ? The battery(s) would have to be AA or AAA size. Could they be rechargeable by plugging the device into a charger *or* a mixer input w phantom power ?
Logged
Tom Young
Electroacoustic Design Services
Oxford CT
203-888-6217

John Roberts {JR}

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 16515
  • Hickory, Mississippi, USA
    • Resotune
Re: battery powered (pink) noise stick?
« Reply #24 on: October 12, 2012, 01:08:58 pm »

Maybe John Roberts can weigh-in on the viability of such a device. Is there an inherent obstacle to providing pink noise from a stick/tube package (that is able to be inserted into an XLR receptacle) in balanced form and powered by an internal battery ? The battery(s) would have to be AA or AAA size. Could they be rechargeable by plugging the device into a charger *or* a mixer input w phantom power ?

It's certainly doable, but is it worth me doing... probably not.

I would need a more complete definition to give a more complete answer, but just like most things these days a simple MP3 sound file player can make any sound(s) you want.

I think the balanced output is a stretch. For a floating battery powered dongle, there is no external ground connection to corrupt the signal.

A digital console should be able to make noise, or playback a noise file, so what's the difference between patching an XLR from the console into each amp input or a pocket playback source.

In fact this sounds like another candidate for an  $0.99 Iphone app. 

It is against my personal philosophy to design hardware for applications that can be satisfied with an Iphone app, or console plug-in. If I did I would redesign my TS-1 and put a noise source in it along with other bells and whistles, but no, that window of opportunity has passed me by.

JR

 
Logged
Don't tune your drums half-ass. Listen to what a properly "cleared" drum sounds like.   http://circularscience.com/

Riley Casey

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1463
Re: battery powered (pink) noise stick?
« Reply #25 on: October 12, 2012, 02:30:46 pm »

+3 

Whirlwind makes the closet thing to an industry standard box with annual unit sales of what maybe 5000 units and a sale price $200.   A purpose built XLR barrel with volume control, a switch between pink noise and sine wave, output up to one volt into 10K ohm from a AA battery with annual unit volume of maybe 200 pieces?  I'm guessing $500 per unit might cover it.  Just convince someone to pony up a few $k and a few months of effort to design and build a prototype and work up the production resources, line up some working capital - the usual drill.

Apple and presumeably Samsung make do everything boxes with unit sales in the millions and a selling price not much more than the Qbox. Sounds like JR is right on the money.


It's certainly doable, but is it worth me doing... probably not.

I would need a more complete definition to give a more complete answer, but just like most things these days a simple MP3 sound file player can make any sound(s) you want.

I think the balanced output is a stretch. For a floating battery powered dongle, there is no external ground connection to corrupt the signal.

A digital console should be able to make noise, or playback a noise file, so what's the difference between patching an XLR from the console into each amp input or a pocket playback source.

In fact this sounds like another candidate for an  $0.99 Iphone app. 

It is against my personal philosophy to design hardware for applications that can be satisfied with an Iphone app, or console plug-in. If I did I would redesign my TS-1 and put a noise source in it along with other bells and whistles, but no, that window of opportunity has passed me by.

JR

Tom Young

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 620
Re: battery powered (pink) noise stick?
« Reply #26 on: October 12, 2012, 04:20:53 pm »

It's certainly doable, but is it worth me doing... probably not.

I really didn't mean to suggest that you would want to do this. I was just interested in your assessment.

I would need a more complete definition to give a more complete answer, but just like most things these days a simple MP3 sound file player can make any sound(s) you want.

We need something kept handy (in shoulder bag, tool box or work box), easy to just put in pants pocket when needed and can survive a drop of 60' or so. Plus it needs to plug into the XLR input of the speaker or speaker patch panel or other device we wish to test.  Having to also schlep a cable puts a serious damper on simplicity an ease

I think the balanced output is a stretch. For a floating battery powered dongle, there is no external ground connection to corrupt the signal.

But we need to drive a balanced input.

A digital console should be able to make noise, or playback a noise file, so what's the difference between patching an XLR from the console into each amp input or a pocket playback source.

And if the console is not "out" (at the gig or in the warehouse) ? Or what about if you find one element in a selfpowered array/cluster to be non-functioning and you have also checked the drive (line level) cable up to the input of the speaker, the next step is to plug into the speaker and this could be while up in the air.

In fact this sounds like another candidate for an  $0.99 Iphone app. 

Given all points I made, not so.

It is against my personal philosophy to design hardware for applications that can be satisfied with an Iphone app, or console plug-in. If I did I would redesign my TS-1 and put a noise source in it along with other bells and whistles, but no, that window of opportunity has passed me by.

Your TS-1 would not be a good candidate for this extremely compact and "single minded" device.

JR
Logged
Tom Young
Electroacoustic Design Services
Oxford CT
203-888-6217

John Roberts {JR}

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 16515
  • Hickory, Mississippi, USA
    • Resotune
Re: battery powered (pink) noise stick?
« Reply #27 on: October 12, 2012, 04:57:36 pm »



That is how I assess stuff...

====
While you don't want to drop your smart phone 60', MP3 players are pretty compact.

=======

I still don't understand the fixation on balanced output.  You can put a single ended signal into a balanced input and have it work fine. You would only lose the modest additional troubleshooting benefit of exercising both pins of the XLR input connector.

======

The circuitry to do this is about like your pinky fingernail. The 3 position level control switch will probably be larger than that, and the battery will be larger again than all that.

Without a detailed spec I can only guess, but I would be inclined to use a metal tube with XLR male sticking out one end, the on/off and level coming out the other end. The length of tube, could be defined by the voltage needs (i.e. x number of batteries). For example what is the max level of the pink noise and crest factor of that noise waveform? Of course it doesn't have to use AA cells that will grow to some significant length if several volts are needed. While smaller more exotic cells will not deliver the mA hours.   

I could imagine this being relatively large/heavy pocket candy, due to xlr diameter & batteries length, not something you hang from your keychain.   

JR

I suspect you could look at any other similar gadget that share similar connector/battery/etc constraints. The circuity is the relatively easy part.
 
Logged
Don't tune your drums half-ass. Listen to what a properly "cleared" drum sounds like.   http://circularscience.com/

Simon Lewis

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 79
Re: battery powered (pink) noise stick?
« Reply #28 on: October 12, 2012, 07:02:34 pm »

Think about it: what does a single frequency tone tell you about the condition of a loudspeaker as opposed to random noise which typically covers the audio spectrum?
Granted - not much use for speaker analysis - but I've used a cheap device such as that as a low cost test tone generator that can work at mic or line level, and is robust enough to live in the tool box. 
Logged

Tom Young

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 620
Re: battery powered (pink) noise stick?
« Reply #29 on: October 12, 2012, 07:33:59 pm »

Granted - not much use for speaker analysis - but I've used a cheap device such as that as a low cost test tone generator that can work at mic or line level, and is robust enough to live in the tool box.

With all due respect, that's not quite right. As someone else pointed out, tones can reveal several speaker flaws. But you need to sweep over a range of frequencies (which frequencies depends on whether it's a LF cone or a HF device) and the signal must be amplified.

Everyone with a serious/professional association with audio has a tone generator of one sort or another.

They are invaluable for testing all sorts of things.

But this has nothig to do wth the OP.
Logged
Tom Young
Electroacoustic Design Services
Oxford CT
203-888-6217

ProSoundWeb Community

Re: battery powered (pink) noise stick?
« Reply #29 on: October 12, 2012, 07:33:59 pm »


Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5   Go Up
 



Page created in 0.057 seconds with 22 queries.