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Author Topic: Does Speaker cab "Throw" Exist ?  (Read 8238 times)

Ivan Beaver

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Re: Does Speaker cab "Throw" Exist ?
« Reply #10 on: September 02, 2012, 06:42:29 pm »

I thought that speaker throw was during break down at the end of a long day how far the stagehands can pitch the speakers into the truck without hitting anything else.  ;)
I know you intended this as funny-but when I worked as a music store bench tech-I wouild do a lot of repair work for a political satire group.  I mean mostly physical damage-horn drivers broken off-knobs broken off of mixers and so forth.

I wondered how they could possibly damage gear this much.

I saw one of their gigs.  At the end they pulled a stake body truck (open top) and literaly pitched the cabinets and the mixers etc into the truck.  No big deal for a loudspeaker to land on top of a mixer.  They just gave it to me to fix.

Always paid their bills and never complained.

i asked they whey they don't take a little bit more time and be careful.

They said that a lot of times they would really piss off people and needed to get "out of town" as soon as possible.

Yes it does happen.
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Ivan Beaver
Danley Sound Labs

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Rory Buszka

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Re: Does Speaker cab "Throw" Exist ?
« Reply #11 on: September 02, 2012, 07:44:47 pm »

I think we can say it even more simply:

"Throw" is the ability of a loudspeaker to deliver the needed sound level and intelligibility at a particular distance.

To produce the needed level for long 'throw', the loudspeaker (and upstream amplification and processing) needs to have the ability to produce the calculated SPL requirement of the design at distance, with dynamic headroom to spare. The loudspeaker or array of loudspeakers also needs to have a clean-enough impulse response at that distance for preservation of sonic details across the entire bandwidth. This requires attention to physical alignment of the acoustic centers of the drivers, and a tightly-controlled pattern so that reflections don't cloud the impulse response observed at the seating location. Once you achieve that, you have a speaker that can be marketed as "long-throw".
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Tom Young

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Re: Does Speaker cab "Throw" Exist ?
« Reply #12 on: September 02, 2012, 08:44:00 pm »

The loudspeaker or array of loudspeakers also needs to have a clean-enough impulse response at that distance for preservation of sonic details across the entire bandwidth. This requires attention to physical alignment of the acoustic centers of the drivers, and a tightly-controlled pattern so that reflections don't cloud the impulse response observed at the seating location. Once you achieve that, you have a speaker that can be marketed as "long-throw".

This implies that careful loudspeaker design and the best IR possible are not as critical for medium or short throw devices.

Which of course is not the case.

One can argue that loudspeaker design flaws are more audible (and therefore of greater concern) in the near field, or when used for short throw.
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Tom Young
Electroacoustic Design Services
Oxford CT
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Does Speaker cab "Throw" Exist ?
« Reply #12 on: September 02, 2012, 08:44:00 pm »


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