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Author Topic: Pro A/V/L resume?  (Read 6945 times)

Brad Weber

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Re: Pro A/V/L resume?
« Reply #10 on: March 13, 2013, 07:57:02 am »

I have 2 separate pages I would send out. The first is a general resume (but always customized) with job titles and responsibilities. Since it's a technical job, I didn't bother using half the resume to list systems/boards I've worked with. Instead, I had a separate page with systems, boards, controllers, software, DAW, ect ect
So many people pad resumes to make them look better that I put little faith in lists of the hardware and software people have used until I can ascertain how well they really know what they've listed.  Similar with past experience, I assume that a name without any description of your involvement likely means there was minimal involvement.
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Josh Hana

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Re: Pro A/V/L resume?
« Reply #11 on: March 13, 2013, 05:12:02 pm »

So many people pad resumes to make them look better that I put little faith in lists of the hardware and software people have used until I can ascertain how well they really know what they've listed.  Similar with past experience, I assume that a name without any description of your involvement likely means there was minimal involvement.

Well this is probably true for a lot of people, I try to include some kind of description ("Experienced in designing/flying/teching/mixing" on any given system). One show not too long ago, a bunch of stagehands were crowding around the Venue Profile talking about how much they liked mixing on it, so when we had a problem during line check, I went on stage and told someone to get on the monitor board to check the line. Not 1 out of the 4-5 guys actually offered to go lol

The #1 reason I got the job I'm currently at is because I had experience with L'Acoustics rigs and the Venue Sc48/Profile on my resume. That's the company's A (and also B) rig, so they thought I'd be a good fit. Had little to nothing to do with the rest of my resume.
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AllenDeneau

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Re: Pro A/V/L resume?
« Reply #12 on: March 15, 2013, 10:49:14 am »

Thanks all, great insight, I appreciate it.

In my past I was responsible for reviewing resumes and scheduling interviews BUT, this wasn't a technical field, it was for DIY lumberyard warehouse associates, basically wanted to see if they were regularly employed, how many jobs they've had etc... not much in the way of specialized skills... That's what's throwing me with re-doing mine.

Mark, I certainly agree on personalized resumes and do so when it's possible. If nothing more it demonstrates that I am attentive to details AND I care enough to put the extra effort in to sell myself to them in "their" way...

Brad, can you give me some examples of how to put specific details of gear experience in without getting too long? Also, any suggestion how to demonstrate that while I have some experience in the Yamaha Digital stuff, it's mostly been through their training sessions... I do feel very comfortable in operating an LS9, M7CL and even the PM stuff, I just haven't had the opportunity to do it all that much... Most of my experience is with analog :(

What do sound providers want to see on a resume? I know stage plots? I understand signal flow and gain structure? I am great with an eq and wireless mic systems? I know wrapping cables around your hand and elbow is WRONG? I understand the difference between a dynamic and condensor mic and when to use them? This is where my confusion arises, what to list and how to do it without getting too long on the resume...

Josh, would you be willing to forward me a copy of how you divide yours up, I really like that idea...

I am currently trying to revise my resume to submit it for a job opening that was posted here in Nashville for corporate event services. This posting is for everything from A1,A2's to general labor. While my passion and best expertise is in sound, I also do know a bit about lighting and enjoy it, how do you include both without sounding schitzophrenic in wanting "everything"?

Here's the job posting:
"The nations leading provider of corporate Audio Visual Labor is looking for qualified people in the following areas:

Audio Engineers (A1)
Audio Assists (A2)
Video Engineers (V1)
Video Assists (V2)
Lighting Engineer/Designer (L1/LD)
Lighting Assists (L2)
AV Technicians
Stagehands
Camera Op's
Set Carpenters
Truck Loaders
Computer/IT Techs

Experience working live / corporate events is required. We only hire qualified, experienced, positive team players with strong customer service skills.

Due to the volume of resumes we receive, it would be helpful if you included a list of equipment with which you have experience. (i.e Yamaha Mixers, Folsom Switchers, Hog Lighting Consoles, etc.)"


While I haven't ever been a "crew" person as I've owned my own company, I do have TONS of corporate experience. Everything from providing sound for a corporate party DJ to mixing presenters in training sessions to working with bands ( 2 channels to over 40 inputs)...

My level of experience ranges from mom & pop small biz to major cities planning and event services, "Tast of Chicago" etc.... so I am, IMO, a perfect fit for this job... I'm college educated, responsible and reliable. I'm eager to learn and advance and I'm teachable. I have a CDL A with air brake endorsement and I'm drug free. By owning my own company and working for some pretty notable corporations, and being trusted with their events, I understand the atmosphere of corporate events and how to conduct myself to best represent the company I am working for and the company who we're working for..

Thanks guys, hope that helps a bit... I do appreciate your input..
« Last Edit: March 18, 2013, 12:33:31 pm by AllenDeneau »
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Allen D.
Sound | DJ | Lighting

Thomas Bishop

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Re: Pro A/V/L resume?
« Reply #13 on: March 16, 2013, 10:35:46 pm »

I gave Nashville a bit of a try for about a year and a half.  I'm sure you've heard how hard it is to break in as a musician there; it's equally as hard to get yourself planted as a competent (read "well-paid") sound engineer.  After a failed attempt at landing a job at Bandit Lites I ended up moving back to NJ.  Not saying that to discourage you, but only to say I was in the same boat and quit fairly quickly.  No one was impressed that I was a business owner for 5 years.

Try to look at your resume from the perspective of the potential employer.  When I read a resume certain things jump out at me that make me know that the candidate is a serious option.  I don't believe in listing all the gear you know but well placed key words with mentioning the hot toys of the month will grab the reader's attention.  If you know how to rig put that in there.  Using technical (but not too technical) terms will go a long way to prove your knowledge.  "Up-rigging, bridle, troubleshooting, certified, digital, line array, etc" are some words that would stand out to me.

Also, don't go back too far in your employment.  It's not relevant that you worked at a fast food restaurant in high school.  If you want your age to be ambiguous make sure not to put anything that would easily give that away.  Age discrimination is a big deal but it happens.  Since my name is on this post, though, I'll say that I've never done it...

Make sure if you have a Facebook (or similar) page that there's nothing on it that you wouldn't want a potential employer to see.  One of the first things I do after reading a resume is search for him/her on Facebook.  If you have a company web site you could put a link to it somewhere in the resume.  These days most resumes will be initially read on a computer or smart phone.  If you have pictures of your work it will give a very immediate and direct idea of the work you have done.  And since these are the mediums of viewing make sure your resume is in a format that any digital device in the world can read.  I prefer PDF over Word documents, but that's just me.  I don't like the time it takes to open a Word document, sometimes the formatting is off, and anything MY computer thinks is a mistake - whether it is or not - will end up being red underlined and hard on the eyes.  If you're on a PC CutePDF is a good program that allows you to use the print function to save as a PDF.

In the end it's really going to come down to your availability.  And if you get a call to work I would suggest you cancel any other non life or death plans in order to make it.  You're probably like me in that you really only need one gig to get called back  In my case getting that first call just never happened.  But that one gig can change your life.  Scary, huh?  :)

Good luck.  Hopefully things are getting better in Nashville.  At least the Spring/Summer season is approaching and companies are surely crewing up.  Now's the time to get those resumes in though.  If you want too long they'll be all set.
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Thomas Bishop

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Re: Pro A/V/L resume?
« Reply #14 on: March 16, 2013, 10:39:14 pm »

I would also take down the email address giving away the name of the company looking for people that these forums are filled with. 
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Tommy Peel

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Re: Re: Pro A/V/L resume?
« Reply #15 on: March 17, 2013, 01:04:24 am »

And since these are the mediums of viewing make sure your resume is in a format that any digital device in the world can read.  I prefer PDF over Word documents, but that's just me.  I don't like the time it takes to open a Word document, sometimes the formatting is off, and anything MY computer thinks is a mistake - whether it is or not - will end up being red underlined and hard on the eyes.  If you're on a PC CutePDF is a good program that allows you to use the print function to save as a PDF.

PDF is definitely the best way to send a resume but if you need to send it as a word document you should "clean" the copy you are sending. There is an option to clear all of the undo records/tracked changes. Also I think there is a way to disable the spell checking(red underlines) on a per document basis. Next time I have access to Word I'll look for the setting(probably at work tomorrow afternoon because I don't have Word on my computer). You can also disable editing and other functions in a document.

Sent from my Milestone X using Tapatalk 2

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Thomas Bishop

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Re: Pro A/V/L resume?
« Reply #16 on: March 17, 2013, 11:15:35 am »

I believe that's under Language setting
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Andrew Hollis

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Re: Pro A/V/L resume?
« Reply #17 on: March 17, 2013, 02:18:45 pm »

I suggest you're over thinking this. You've gotten plenty of useful advice and without specifics I think you could do this all day, just consuming feel-good advice. How about posting your resume for specific advice.

I second that Word docs should never be sent to strangers. Only PDF. Word screams "amateur old timer."

I wouldn't lead with "Mom and Pop experience" since it sounds like you've done much larger things. The small stuff isn't relevant at all once you've done bigger things--it just muddles your message. They don't want your life story. Also, they want crew people, not business owners, so I wouldn't pitch that side hard either. I suggest condensing and focusing your message.

CDL A could be a big one. Someone's gotta drive the truck to the venue...

Quote
I am great with an eq and wireless mic systems? I know wrapping cables around your hand and elbow is WRONG? I understand the difference between a dynamic and condensor mic and when to use them? This is where my confusion arises, what to list and how to do it without getting too long on the resume...

I think obviously no one wants to know this stuff on a resume. This is the absolute basics that anyone beyond intern is expected to know. One can infer from corporate sound experience that a candidate has done these things.

Tommy Peel

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Re: Re: Pro A/V/L resume?
« Reply #18 on: March 17, 2013, 04:26:39 pm »

PDF is definitely the best way to send a resume but if you need to send it as a word document you should "clean" the copy you are sending. There is an option to clear all of the undo records/tracked changes.
Just checked Word today and this option is at office button(2007 this is the version I checked) or file(2010 just guessing on this version, I don't have access to it)>prepare>inspect document. Also under the prepare menu there is an option to "mark as final" this makes it read only.
Quote
Also I think there is a way to disable the spell checking(red underlines) on a per document basis.
This is under office button/file>Word Options>Proofing>at the bottom there are two check boxes that disable spell and grammer checking for that document. I'm fairly certain these settings stay with the document.
Quote
Next time I have access to Word I'll look for the setting(probably at work tomorrow afternoon because I don't have Word on my computer). You can also disable editing and other functions in a document.

Sent from my Milestone X using Tapatalk 2

I checked all of this on Office 2007(it's what we have at work) and I'll try to check the 2010 version at college next week(it's on the lab computers) and post if it's very different. PDF is still the way to go unless they request a Word document; also the 2007 and 2010 versions can save to PDF directly from the file menu as can Pages on a Mac.

Hope this helps,
Tommy Peel
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Mac Kerr

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« Reply #19 on: March 17, 2013, 05:19:18 pm »

PDF is still the way to go unless they request a Word document; also the 2007 and 2010 versions can save to PDF directly from the file menu as can Pages on a Mac.

Hope this helps,
Tommy Peel

Never send an editable file to a client or potential client, or pretty much anyone else unless you want them to edit it. Send PDFs only. This does not just apply to resumes.

Since 1972 I can count on one finger the number of jobs I have gotten because of a resume. Even that one, although they asked for a resume, I had an interview based on a personal recommendation. It was probably the interview and the recommendation that got me the job.

Mac
« Last Edit: March 17, 2013, 11:26:01 pm by Mac Kerr »
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« Reply #19 on: March 17, 2013, 05:19:18 pm »


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