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Author Topic: How hard is pyro?  (Read 7020 times)

James Feenstra

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Re: How hard is pyro?
« Reply #10 on: July 26, 2012, 01:09:09 pm »

for a licensed pyro guy (you need someone specifically licensed in your state as well, at least in the US, canada has a canada wide ticket, other countries vary) you're looking at $3000-5000 BEFORE they're actually adding in any product

then you have to pay for double the product you'll actually be firing on the show, as a fire marshall can (And will, on occasion) as for every single effect to be demonstrated before the show starts. $2000 worth or product fired during your show (which isn't much) therefore costs you $4000.

a Pyro company will typically carry their own insurance, so no need to worry about that, and they'll likely know what permits/etc are required.

personally I'd recommend Pyrotek if you're anywhere near Toronto or Las Vegas, although they can probably point you in the right direction even if you're not.

I've been a licensed pyro guy in Canada for about 2 years....gigs are few and far between so it's not enough to make a career out of at the moment, budgets for that sort of thing (ie. high liability effects) has gone down a LOT

Pyro is cool, but there's lots of other wowing effects that cost a lot less and are a lot less dangerous, ie;

cryo
confettii/streamers
automation (moving truss/video walls/etc)
propane (also dangerous/expensive, but not as much as explosives, can also do different colors easily)
vertical smoke effects
dry ice

it really depends on what you're trying to do with your show. give me a shout via email if you want to talk more about it;

jamesafeenstra at gmail dot com
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Charlie Zureki

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Re: How hard is pyro?
« Reply #11 on: July 26, 2012, 02:18:56 pm »

Hello Matt,

   There is a lot of misinformation that's been posted in this thread. So...here goes:

  In the US, there is only one National License needed.... the BATFE type 19 license.  It is the license needed for the Pyro Tech's ability to mix flash powders and purchase electric matches for pyro use.   Contact the BATFE for an application form, the cost is very small for the license.

 In the U.S., about half of the States require a special State License for the use of Theatrical Pyro devices, and the others, of course do not have an special State sanctioned Licenses. These licenses are generally less than $40.

   There is a free pamplet from the BATFE .... ATF P 5400.7 the Orange book. Anyone can request a copy of this...go to their website..

   There is a comprehensive Book by the NFPA ... number 1126 and it's cost is about $50. It gives much more data and fire safety information.

   In the States that do not require a State Pyro License, (such as Michigan) the regulation of Theatrical Pyro is administered by the Local City/Township or County Fire Department. These local agencies are where one would seek an application for permitting of Theatrical Pyro. (They generally require a short written test also)  These Permits can range from $100 and up.   The Local competantcy test cost is usually under $40,  with a time restricted license granted upon passing.   

    These City and BATFE licenses (including State Licenses) DO NOT exempt a Pyro Tech/Company from attaining a permit for the event(s).  Again the obtaining of a local Permit is Manditory before any or all Pyro demonstrations.

   Theatrical Pyro is no more or less dangerous than most consumer Fireworks.  Precautions must be taken to ensure all safety requirements are met.  Most Theatrical Pyrotechnic devices are manufactured and prepackaged for use.  THere are some flash powders and etc.. that must be mixed prior to use, but, this is where the BATFE regulations and certification/licensing comes in.

   Most Theatrical Pyro injuries have not been caused by the devices themselves, but, by other nearby items catching fire or causing hazardous smoke.  If a person uses caution and follows the instructions, there should be no risk for injuries.

   Good Luck,
   Hammer 

 
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Matt Collins

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Re: How hard is pyro?
« Reply #12 on: July 26, 2012, 03:28:20 pm »

What would be a ballpark cost for cryo?
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Rob Spence

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How hard is pyro?
« Reply #13 on: July 26, 2012, 03:41:11 pm »

Perhaps you need to ask that of a vendor?


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Nick Pignetti

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Re: How hard is pyro?
« Reply #14 on: July 26, 2012, 06:36:09 pm »

What would be a ballpark cost for cryo?

I run cryo jets on some of my shows.

Ballpark on $1,500-$2,000 per nozzle, with hose, power, and everything needed to make it work from a technical standpoint. Then you need the liquid Co2. Airgas is one of the largest suppliers of gas (its who I use) You'll need to set up an account with them and they will get you the dewar tanks you need for your effects. Wiring it up and firing it are easy. You'll need a controller as well. You can even use light to mimic pryo (to an extent). The difficult part is lugging the equipment around. You'll not only need dewar tanks (100lbs+ up to 350 or so each depending on the size you get) but you'll need multiple tanks. An average 50lb (100lbs or so full) tank will give you anywhere from 30s-1m of burst for an average high flow jet. Don't forget the expense for carts to move the tanks around (they are expensive, a few hundred each) I average 2 50lb tanks per jet per show. (testing, wet show runs, and the show itself)

You definitely need a good truck, with a ramp or my recommendation- liftgate and e track or the like to make sure you can safely secure the tanks in transit.
It's more the logistical headache and expense than actually buying the jets and Co2. I'm not saying all this to scare you off, because it really is quite easy- but there are definitely many effects that can be achieved easier and cheaper.
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James Feenstra

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Re: How hard is pyro?
« Reply #15 on: July 26, 2012, 11:34:26 pm »

remember that everything that's not explosive (ie. co2, propane, confetti, etc) can be fired via dmx off lighting control as well, although the shooter will ALWAYS require a clear, unobstructed view of the stage in it's entirety in order to determine if it's safe to fire or not

realistically, special effects are not cheap, which is why they're called special effects....if everyone had/could afford them they wouldn't be that special!
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Re: How hard is pyro?
« Reply #15 on: July 26, 2012, 11:34:26 pm »


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