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Author Topic: How hard is pyro?  (Read 7001 times)

Matt Collins

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How hard is pyro?
« on: July 26, 2012, 12:30:42 am »

Looks like I'm doing production for a fairly large event, and I need to make a splash. Pyro was the quickest way I can think to do that.

Obviously since the GW incident it has become much harder these days.

But exactly how hard is it, what would I be looking at spending to make it happen?


Also, what are good alternatives. Cryo I guess? What else?

My specialty is audio so I'm a bit in the dark here. Any suggested advice is appreciated!
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Jordan Wolf

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Re: How hard is pyro?
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2012, 12:50:07 am »

The money you spend on doing it the safe and correct way will be much less than even one of the lawsuits brought against you should something go wrong.

Pay for the pros to do it…hands off.
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Jordan Wolf
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Charlie Zureki

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Re: How hard is pyro?
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2012, 01:09:07 am »

Looks like I'm doing production for a fairly large event, and I need to make a splash. Pyro was the quickest way I can think to do that.

Obviously since the GW incident it has become much harder these days.

But exactly how hard is it, what would I be looking at spending to make it happen?


Also, what are good alternatives. Cryo I guess? What else?

My specialty is audio so I'm a bit in the dark here. Any suggested advice is appreciated!

   Pyro is not hard, but, it does take a no- bullshit attitude.... as in NO Short cuts or screwing around.  Basically, a person "designs" the pyro show from available, ready made effects that can be purchased from a Manufacturer.  The "design" phase takes into consideration the venue's ceiling height, ambient construction materials, and surrounding materials, proximaty to the audience, and control barriers.  There must be a safety plan and safety devices such as approved extinguishers available. 

    Generally, a one-time permit is purchased through the local fire agency or State Fire Marshall's office. Many localities require an applicant to test for a permit.  The gags are set up for a walk through inspection prior to the show. (Usually at lunch break) After a preliminary approval by the Inspector or Fire Marshall, the effects are demonstrated if requested.

   Many seasoned Pyro Techs are known by Local Fire Marshalls or Inspectors because years of Touring have made them aquainted.

   My advice is to hire a local Pyro Tech (with experience) and allow them to do their thing.  You can learn a lot just by observation.  If the idea of adding Pyro to your resume is your interest, there are classes given by some of the Pyro Manufacturers.

   Dr. Kosanke... (if he's not retired), is one of the top Pyro Chemists in the World, a Military and Industry Consultant. and teaches short courses at various Universities.  He is the Chemist that solved the problem of getting the color white in Pyro effects, something, that was elusive in the past.

   Remember, there are two areas of Pyro.. Stage pyro and exhibit Pyro...and I'm guessing you're interested in Stage Pyro.

    Good Luck, and remember the Insurance policy.

    Hammer
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DanGlass

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Re: How hard is pyro?
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2012, 06:30:44 am »

Wiring everything up, push the button, launch pyro = easy
Wiring everything up, push the button, launch pyro, kill someone = even easier

This one area that I have to admit I did experiment with, but fortunately for me I realized that I had no idea what I was doing and quit.  Flames, sparks, and bangs are not a way to experiment.  Just think of it this way, would you be willing to stand on the stage if you knew that the guy who put the pyro together didnt have any experience?  There are way to many variables to know and consider like crowd distance, wind, flammables, sight lines, and the list goes on.  Another thing to consider, other than possibly killing someone, is that if something went wrong you would be forever known as the guy who caused it and your phone would become real quiet.

Spend the money on a pro.  As an alternative cryo is a really great effect.
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Matt Collins

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Re: How hard is pyro?
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2012, 09:49:27 am »

Yeah I definitely don't plan on doing anything myself.

I am just curious what the minimum cost I could expect to incur to do pyro at my show would be?

Once I have a ballpark figure I would know if it's feasible or not.
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Tim Perry

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Re: How hard is pyro?
« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2012, 10:00:28 am »

Yeah I definitely don't plan on doing anything myself.

I am just curious what the minimum cost I could expect to incur to do pyro at my show would be?

Once I have a ballpark figure I would know if it's feasible or not.

No one can even give you even a vage idea of cost without even a vage idea of the scope of the requirements.

How about you speculate on how lighting effects such as lasers, laser emulators, movers, chases can supplement your show.
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Matt Collins

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Re: How hard is pyro?
« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2012, 10:12:07 am »

No one can even give you even a vage idea of cost without even a vage idea of the scope of the requirements.
An arena holding 10,000 people.

How about you speculate on how lighting effects such as lasers, laser emulators, movers, chases can supplement your show.
I am an audio guy, my knowledge in these areas is limited, which is why I'm asking the question here.  :P

 I'd like to do pyro, but if it is too difficult (or expensive) I am definitely open to other options.
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brian maddox

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Re: How hard is pyro?
« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2012, 11:38:31 am »

An arena holding 10,000 people.
I am an audio guy, my knowledge in these areas is limited, which is why I'm asking the question here.  :P

 I'd like to do pyro, but if it is too difficult (or expensive) I am definitely open to other options.

this one is a 'call a pro and get a quote' kind of thing.  we aren't gonna be of much use to you without a bunch more info.  and if you're gonna go to the trouble to give us all the info, might as well just go to a pro and give them the info.

couple of tips on picking a pyro guy...

1.  don't hire a kid.  if they are barely old enough to vote, they've got no place on your show.

2.  don't hire a 9 fingered old guy.  nuff said....

and as i often say...  every great gig story starts with the words 'so there was pyro' and ends with the words 'emergency room'....
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brian maddox
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TJ (Tom) Cornish

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Re: How hard is pyro?
« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2012, 11:46:15 am »

I've done something qualifying as pyro once - angle grinders on metal sheathed setpieces.  This is surprisingly cool to see, and being non-incendiary, quite a bit safer than some other things.

This was done in a hotel ballroom, and we did the following to make it happen:
Permit from city FD
Insurance rider with hotel
Fire treatment of clothing of everyone on-stage
Covered floor with masonite painted with flame retardant paint
Fire watch - FD onsite during event

In the end, it cost us about $1000 for the permit, fire watch, fire treatment, etc. I think, and it was pretty cool.  This picture is of a practice run, hence the empty chairs.  For the actual event, folks were wearing black.  The pictures don't do it justice.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2012, 11:48:02 am by TJ (Tom) Cornish »
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brian maddox

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Re: How hard is pyro?
« Reply #9 on: July 26, 2012, 11:49:07 am »

I've done something qualifying as pyro once - angle grinders on metal sheathed setpieces.  This is surprisingly cool to see, and being non-incendiary, quite a bit safer than some other things.

This was done in a hotel ballroom, and we did the following to make it happen:
Permit from city FD
Insurance rider with hotel
Fire treatment of clothing of everyone on-stage
Covered floor with masonite painted with flame retardant paint
Fire watch - FD onsite during event

In the end, it cost us about $1000 for the permit, fire watch, fire treatment, etc. I think, and it was pretty cool.  This picture is of a practice run, hence the empty chairs.  For the actual event, folks were wearing black.  The pictures don't do it justice.

that one i have not seen.  very cool idea...
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"It feels wrong to be in the audience.  And it's too peopley!" - Steve Smith

brian maddox
bdmaudio@gmail.com

'...do not trifle with the affairs of dragons...

       ....for you are crunchy, and taste good with ketchup...'

ProSoundWeb Community

Re: How hard is pyro?
« Reply #9 on: July 26, 2012, 11:49:07 am »


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