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Author Topic: Audio Technica AE5400  (Read 8009 times)

g'bye, Dick Rees

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Re: Audio Technica AE5400
« Reply #10 on: May 29, 2012, 07:34:17 pm »

So, bottom line, is the AE5400, in your opinion, more prone to feedback than most other cardiod mics, as in the shure sm58?

Not necessarily.  Any mic is just another part of the system.  How you set up the system, how you run it and what you have to accomplish with it all come into play.  Feedback happens.  There are many things you can do to lower the chance of setting off a loop.

As Tim said, the two mics in question are very different animals.  You have to treat them differently to get them to play nice.  The Audix is designed to be easy to use in high SPL situations.  The 5400 is one of the better sounding vocal mics I've encountered.  They each have their uses.

As to the GEQ/PEQ comments:

A gross caricature of the two would be "axe/scalpel".  Both will make the required cuts.  The axe will do it quickly but takes out large chunks of material to get at the "problem".  The scalpel will take slightly longer but not leave a bloody mess.

And to those who consider PEQ to be more difficult to apply I would say that if you understand how to really use a GEQ effectively, switching over to PEQ is not at all difficult.  The objectives are the same and the methods parallel.  Yes, it may take a bit longer to set up.......just a bit.  But you get what you pay for.   Spend an extra moment or two to get a better, more precise result (removing less program material over all) and you'll be farther ahead in sound quality and system stability.

Yes, a GEQ will be quicker.  But for that speed and ease of operation you often pay a cost in sound quality IMO. 
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David Parker

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Re: Audio Technica AE5400
« Reply #11 on: May 29, 2012, 08:43:45 pm »

Not necessarily.  Any mic is just another part of the system.  How you set up the system, how you run it and what you have to accomplish with it all come into play.  Feedback happens.  There are many things you can do to lower the chance of setting off a loop.

As Tim said, the two mics in question are very different animals.  You have to treat them differently to get them to play nice.  The Audix is designed to be easy to use in high SPL situations.  The 5400 is one of the better sounding vocal mics I've encountered.  They each have their uses.

As to the GEQ/PEQ comments:

A gross caricature of the two would be "axe/scalpel".  Both will make the required cuts.  The axe will do it quickly but takes out large chunks of material to get at the "problem".  The scalpel will take slightly longer but not leave a bloody mess.

And to those who consider PEQ to be more difficult to apply I would say that if you understand how to really use a GEQ effectively, switching over to PEQ is not at all difficult.  The objectives are the same and the methods parallel.  Yes, it may take a bit longer to set up.......just a bit.  But you get what you pay for.   Spend an extra moment or two to get a better, more precise result (removing less program material over all) and you'll be farther ahead in sound quality and system stability.

Yes, a GEQ will be quicker.  But for that speed and ease of operation you often pay a cost in sound quality IMO.

in this situation I didn't need a scalpel. I'd notch one fader on the 1/3 octave graphic and then the one right next to it would start ringing. This happened all up and down the frequency range. That mic was NOT going to play nice in that environment. One of the lessons we have to learn in this business is to realize when we are whipped, and go to plan "B".
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g'bye, Dick Rees

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Re: Audio Technica AE5400
« Reply #12 on: May 29, 2012, 09:14:19 pm »

in this situation I didn't need a scalpel. I'd notch one fader on the 1/3 octave graphic and then the one right next to it would start ringing. This happened all up and down the frequency range. That mic was NOT going to play nice in that environment. One of the lessons we have to learn in this business is to realize when we are whipped, and go to plan "B".

I'm of the opposite opinion.  In such situations what is required is the ability to precisely remove exactly those (narrow) frequencies that are problematic.  You may need a 16 dB cut on something no wider than a few hz.  To do this with a GEQ is just not going to sound good.  Baby with the bath water, so to speak.

It's a simple enough matter to sweep a narrow, boosted filter through the spectrum to identify the hot frequencies and apply compensation.  With a little bit of practice I'll wager that the average sound person can get "up to speed" on a PEQ in a very short time. 

But if the stage volume is out of hand it's going to be pretty rough to get things to work if you have to push the monitors over the roar.  Again: loudest sound at the mic wins.  If that's the monitors, well........
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Scott Wagner

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Re: Audio Technica AE5400
« Reply #13 on: May 30, 2012, 12:28:54 pm »

Just a quick thought.  The OM7 takes a fair amount of gain, while the AE5400 takes a bit less.  If you simply swapped mics without adjusting the gain proplerly, that could cause all of the issues that you experienced.

Scott Wagner
Big Nickel Audio
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Big Nickel Audio

g'bye, Dick Rees

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Re: Audio Technica AE5400
« Reply #14 on: May 30, 2012, 01:16:46 pm »

Just a quick thought.  The OM7 takes a fair amount of gain, while the AE5400 takes a bit less.  If you simply swapped mics without adjusting the gain proplerly, that could cause all of the issues that you experienced.

Scott Wagner
Big Nickel Audio

From the Audix website:

"The OM7 is used by professional sound companies, front of house and mixing engineers as well as high profile fixed installations. The OM7 provides unprecedented gain before feedback on concert level stages without sacrificing sound quality. In addition, the mic is very resistant to feedback on extremely loud stages and for performers who tend to “cup” the microphone with both hands.
In order to achieve these extraordinary performance benefits, the OM7 is designed with an unconventionally low output level (8-10 dB lower than typical dynamic microphones). This low output level acts as a natural “pad” at the capsule in order to maintain high fidelity at the source. The OM7 is best suited for use with high quality mixing consoles which have plenty of head room to compensate for the low gain."
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David Parker

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Re: Audio Technica AE5400
« Reply #15 on: May 30, 2012, 07:35:46 pm »

Just a quick thought.  The OM7 takes a fair amount of gain, while the AE5400 takes a bit less.  If you simply swapped mics without adjusting the gain proplerly, that could cause all of the issues that you experienced.

Scott Wagner
Big Nickel Audio

you got it all backwards. I had the gain set for the AE5400 and when I swapped to the OM7, I had to drastically increase the gain. I've used OM7's for years, I'm well aware of their need for more gain than most other mics. The problem had nothing to do with gain, the gain was set separately for each mic.
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David Parker

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Re: Audio Technica AE5400
« Reply #16 on: May 30, 2012, 07:37:41 pm »

From the Audix website:

"The OM7 is used by professional sound companies, front of house and mixing engineers as well as high profile fixed installations. The OM7 provides unprecedented gain before feedback on concert level stages without sacrificing sound quality. In addition, the mic is very resistant to feedback on extremely loud stages and for performers who tend to “cup” the microphone with both hands.
In order to achieve these extraordinary performance benefits, the OM7 is designed with an unconventionally low output level (8-10 dB lower than typical dynamic microphones). This low output level acts as a natural “pad” at the capsule in order to maintain high fidelity at the source. The OM7 is best suited for use with high quality mixing consoles which have plenty of head room to compensate for the low gain."

I've owned and used OM7's for years, that's why I had one handy. My go-to mic for problem situations. I'm well aware of their need for additional gain. I had to boost the gain a LOT when I switched from the AE5400 to the OM7.
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Re: Audio Technica AE5400
« Reply #16 on: May 30, 2012, 07:37:41 pm »


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