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Author Topic: Bizarre or goofy consoles from the old days?  (Read 35427 times)

Ike Zimbel

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Re: Bizarre or goofy consoles from the old days?
« Reply #60 on: July 06, 2018, 11:02:24 pm »

As someone essentially said earlier in this vintage thread after there'd been no replies for a couple years, it exists as a history repository so periodic revival is probably OK.

That's cool you got to know him. He came and gave a presentation to our AES Section (Pacific Northwest -Seattle-) in about 1989 or so about the Pin 1 problem. He needed some RFI sources, and I took my Spectrum Controls lighting dimmer, which put out huge RFI even after installation of some chokes, and I was proud/humiliated that he was quite impressed at how much BS it was putting out.

I will actually never forget the awesomeness of that meeting. He started just after 7:30pm with his presentation, and it was completely riveting to everyone in the room. We went from one thing to another to another to another, and were all on the same page in being fascinated by what he was telling us. And he seemed to enjoy being with us and was eager to share his knowledge, which, as you suggest, was ground-breaking at the time and is now accepted practice.

We got to a place where it seemed like it might be a good time to stop for a break and looked at the clock, and it was 12:30AM!

We've never had another meeting like that.

I took his words to heart, and that week went into my 25+ Carver PM-whatever-they were (1250? 2.0? some mixture of those) and put in little jumpers from pin 1 to chassis and never had any more hum/buzz problems with them.

I always wished we have him back again, but it wasn't to be. You're lucky in getting to know him.

Edit: Oh, hey, this is in the History of Concert Sound thread. Of course it can be added to years later.
Neil told me a story about doing a tour of the west coast with his "dog-and-pony-show" about the Pin-1 problem. He was somewhere, maybe San Francisco, doing his demo and when he switched to the "doesn't have the Pin-1 problem" example mixer, a locally supplied Mackie, it buzzed and hummed like crazy. On closer examination, it turned out that all of the jack hardware was loose (and therefore wasn't making a good chassis connection). When they tightened that up, it was quiet.
Later, up the coast in Woodinville, WA, he popped in to the Mackie factory and mentioned this incident to Greg Mackie. Greg said "Just a minute..." and went out to the factory floor. When he came back, he was holding one of the nut drivers (I forget whether they were electric or pneumatic) that they used to tighten all of the 1/4" jacks. In any case, it turned out that the clutches in these tools were worn out and so not tightening the nuts to the proper spec.
I wonder if your presentation was on that same trip.
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~Ike Zimbel~
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Ron Hebbard

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Re: Bizarre or goofy consoles from the old days?
« Reply #61 on: July 07, 2018, 04:09:07 am »

As someone essentially said earlier in this vintage thread after there'd been no replies for a couple years, it exists as a history repository so periodic revival is probably OK.

That's cool you got to know him. He came and gave a presentation to our AES Section (Pacific Northwest -Seattle-) in about 1989 or so about the Pin 1 problem. He needed some RFI sources, and I took my Spectrum Controls lighting dimmer, which put out huge RFI even after installation of some chokes, and I was proud/humiliated that he was quite impressed at how much BS it was putting out.

I will actually never forget the awesomeness of that meeting. He started just after 7:30pm with his presentation, and it was completely riveting to everyone in the room. We went from one thing to another to another to another, and were all on the same page in being fascinated by what he was telling us. And he seemed to enjoy being with us and was eager to share his knowledge, which, as you suggest, was ground-breaking at the time and is now accepted practice.

We got to a place where it seemed like it might be a good time to stop for a break and looked at the clock, and it was 12:30AM!

We've never had another meeting like that.

I took his words to heart, and that week went into my 25+ Carver PM-whatever-they were (1250? 2.0? some mixture of those) and put in little jumpers from pin 1 to chassis and never had any more hum/buzz problems with them.

I always wished we have him back again, but it wasn't to be. You're lucky in getting to know him.

Edit: Oh, hey, this is in the History of Concert Sound thread. Of course it can be added to years later.
Mr. Mortensen Sir!  Dan if I may. 
Approximately 18 months prior to Mr. Muncy's death, I'd heard, probably here on the LAB, that he was seeking donations of broadcast studio and / or transmitter gear to be used as display items in a museum he was affiliated with and hoping to open somewhere in the heart of downtown Toronto.  From my past, I owned two PRISTINE McCurdy Radio Industries, NEVER installed anywhere, broadcast consoles; Two MINT CH12 Turntables and one lightly used HH12 (Home Hysteresis 12) turntable with all three installed in a row including SME arms and Stanton cartridges on a more than solid Arborite surfaced stand supported by detachable, custom welded, 2" square tubular steel chromed legs with adjustable leveling feet.  I boldly wrote Mr. Muncy asking for an address where I could deliver all of this gear along with approximately 40 modules for the larger stereo console (a 4370 If I'm recalling correctly) all originally supplied factory manuals and drawings (A long time friend was a former MRI employee) a mint, never installed 9 input mono console complete with documentation but sans any internal modules and one used, but still operational, tube from the finals of either our Gates or GE 10 Kw transmitter.  Mr. Muncy provided an address and we agreed upon a date and approximate time.  I found myself backing into his home's driveway and knocking on a basement window as directed.  Mr. Muncy exited from a side door wearing slippers to survey what I was delivering, then hollered in his side door for an associate to join him.  Thus I found myself unloading my stuffed van into the hands of Mr. Muncy and the brains behind Surgex (an Australian fellow) followed by an invitation to join them in Mr. Muncy's air conditioned basement for a cooling beverage of my choosing.  Thus followed more than two of the best, most educational / memorable hours of my life; To me, he was Mr. Muncy upon my arrival but he was most emphatically  Neil when I departed.  I can't recall his beverage of choice (Vodka martinis possibly) but he remained startled by my consumption of straight orange juice, ice water and skim milk by the time he was serving sandwiches, finger foods and snacks all around.  Thinking about it, I must've been there for well over three hours by the time we'd emptied my van into one of his garages then escaped from the hot sun to his basement.  Before I departed, Neil asked if I could spare him another 30 minutes as he would appreciate seeing my reaction to a presentation he and captain Surgex were rehearsing for a pending AES meeting of the Toronto AES chapter.  Spare him my time!?!?!?  Hellz bellz!  I was MORE than flattered to be asked.  Having observed my reactions during their presentation followed by politely pummeling me with queries, further food and beverages were offered which I refused as I had about 60 miles of crowded highways to traverse and a show or maintenance chore to get back to.  I'd never attended an AES meeting prior to that point, perceiving their membership to be comprised of folks well above my lowly status; Mr. Muncy, some fellows from Rogers Communications along with Lipshitz and VanderKooy (Sp?) from Waterloo, Ontario's University of Waterloo.  About a week later I found a personal invitation from Neil to attend the Toronto AES meeting where he and Captain Surgex were the guests of honor / keynote speakers.  I arrived to find the lobby already packed when this unknown stranger (Me) arrived and joined the crowd hoping to gain entry.  To say I was surprised would be more than putting it mildly when someone peaked out shortly before the scheduled starting time calling for me BY NAME.  The looks on the faces of the remaining throng in the lobby were beyond priceless.  Upon entry, clutching my personal invite on the rear of one of Neil's business cards, I was escorted to a vacant seat about a third of he way across the front row. 
Such are my memories of Neil Muncy along with a couple of phone calls and my extreme sadness at his passing. 
Thanks Mr. Mortensen for invoking happy memories. 
Toodleoo!
Ron Hebbard
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Dan Mortensen

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Re: Bizarre or goofy consoles from the old days?
« Reply #62 on: July 07, 2018, 03:59:12 pm »

I wonder if your presentation was on that same trip.

I would have to think so. Our meeting was in the U District of Seattle, and Woodinville is 20-30 min away. I don't remember where he was staying, but there was a motel almost across the street from our then-meeting place and it wouldn't surprise me if he was there.

Mr. Mortensen Sir!  Dan if I may. 

Of course, Ron. No need to be formal here.

However, it would be easier to read your great stories (and that was a wonderful one) if you used the return key more often to break up that huge wall of text. Even though wading through it is worth it, you'll lose a lot of readers who would otherwise very much enjoy reading what you want to share.

Did that museum ever open up?

Did Neil know Marshall McLuhan, another great Canadian? I've imagined them chatting, and wondered what it would have been like to be a listener.

Thanks again for the great stories, both of you.
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