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Author Topic: Question about Gymnasium Speaker Placement  (Read 11012 times)

Charlie Zureki

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Re: Question about Gymnasium Speaker Placement
« Reply #10 on: January 25, 2012, 05:59:11 pm »

Jeff....

My ideal resolution of such a situation would be to select a proper delivery system and components, present the plan to the school and have them sell or return the inappropriate stuff they purchased.  In other words, back to square one.  If they are not willing to bite the bullet and do it right, I'd respectfully decline.  You're going to be stuck with "why it doesn't work" forever after.......

DR

  +1 ... also...

   Never take on an install contracting job that leaves you with so many questions. If you have to ask help for the basic solutions, maybe you'd be best passing on the whole job. 

   and... Do you know, or, are you certain of your potential rigging points?  What are the point's materials?  Are you certain that you know the correct rigging hardware to be used? 

   Do you have insurance to cover liability?

   If you're not certain of the exact answers, then, you're probably not qualified.

    It's nice to want to help, but, whom are you really helping if the system doesn't provide significant benefits, and the gear is not completely documented and safely installed, over what they have now? 

   Good Luck, and do the right thing.   

   Hammer
   
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Do it the right way....don't be a Dino!

Ivan Beaver

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Re: Question about Gymnasium Speaker Placement
« Reply #11 on: January 25, 2012, 07:51:09 pm »

Jeff....

My ideal resolution of such a situation would be to select a proper delivery system and components, present the plan to the school and have them sell or return the inappropriate stuff they purchased.  In other words, back to square one.  If they are not willing to bite the bullet and do it right, I'd respectfully decline.  You're going to be stuck with "why it doesn't work" forever after.......

DR
I have done a number of jobs that did not have the proper budget, and I did my best to try and "help them out".  The customer soon forgets about that they did not have the proper budget-and all they remember is that the job that was done did not quite meet they expectations.

So when it comes time for a real job (with a real budget) they don't consider you-because they remember the job you did was not quite what they expected.  Did I mention they forgot that they did not have the budget to do it right.

Yes we all want to help-but as has been said- YOU will be remembered if it doesn't work.  They may constantly come asking you for help to try and "fix" it.

Sometimes it is best to "walk away" and let somebody else deal with the problem
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A complex question is easily answered by a simple-easy to understand WRONG answer!

Ivan Beaver
Danley Sound Labs

PHYSICS- NOT FADS!

Hal Bissinger/COMSYSTEC

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Re: Question about Gymnasium Speaker Placement
« Reply #12 on: January 25, 2012, 11:38:49 pm »

I can tell you where the $4000 budget came from and it's because in their minds it should be sufficient to provide a system that meets their expectations. Why would they allocate money for something that isn't going to work? That they supplied speakers and have an electrician involved means they think they know something. It doesn't matter how you explain to them that if you try and work within their constraints the results will be less than desirable. In the end all they know is is that they spent all this money and it should be much better than what you gave them.
 
This is not the kind of relationship I would want with a customer.
 
-Hal
 
 
 
 
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Ivan Beaver

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Re: Question about Gymnasium Speaker Placement
« Reply #13 on: January 26, 2012, 07:32:15 am »

I can tell you where the $4000 budget came from and it's because in their minds it should be sufficient to provide a system that meets their expectations. Why would they allocate money for something that isn't going to work? That they supplied speakers and have an electrician involved means they think they know something. It doesn't matter how you explain to them that if you try and work within their constraints the results will be less than desirable. In the end all they know is is that they spent all this money and it should be much better than what you gave them.
 
This is not the kind of relationship I would want with a customer.
 
-Hal
We actually had a church come to us and say they were ready for an upgrade.  They held a meeting and discussed the problems and voted on a budget.

They told me they had $100.00 to spend.  Yes ONE HUNDRED dollars.

So what do you want me to do with that?  You just spent that talking to me?

And they had a meeting and VOTED and somehow derived that $100 would "fix" their problems??????

Ya never know where this stuff comes from.
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A complex question is easily answered by a simple-easy to understand WRONG answer!

Ivan Beaver
Danley Sound Labs

PHYSICS- NOT FADS!

Brad Weber

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Re: Question about Gymnasium Speaker Placement
« Reply #14 on: January 26, 2012, 10:13:12 am »

Perhaps the overall issue is simply that of having budgets and expectations that are compatible.  And as a corollary to that, having expectations that are sufficiently defined, supported and documented to make a determination that they are compatible with the budget.

I believe that meeting or exceeding expectations is a critical factor in obtaining a successful result.  The size of the budget, schedule, etc. don;t matter as long as they are compatible with the expectations for the results.  However, if there are limitations or conditions that make that outcome less than a certainty then it becomes vital to try to resolve that.  If the limitations or conditions cannot be altered then 'expectation management', helping clients understand and determine what expectations are feasible given the relevant physical, schedule, resource and financial limitations, becomes vital.  If you can't get everyone to 'buy into' a situation that you feel it tenable then it may indeed be better for everyone to not proceed.

One particular detail that stands out here is that the school apparently started to do this on their own and then changed direction.  Was that simply a realization that they were in over their heads?  Did some key figure in that approach become no longer involved?  Or might it be that something led to nobody there wanting to take responsibility (or blame)?
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