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Author Topic: hearing damage, the same or different at different frequencies?  (Read 9582 times)

Jon Lincoln

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Re: hearing damage, the same or different at different frequencies?
« Reply #10 on: January 12, 2012, 01:53:05 am »

Not sure if anyone here has related or noticed high spl frequencies 2k to 6k ish and alcohol don't mix. For years I have noticed frequency loud mixes causes more fights even at lower db levels, more than a louder clean balanced one. It also is the same with DJ's too. Of course distortion plays a factor also. Any thoughts?     
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Steve Blaski

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Re: hearing damage, the same or different at different frequencies?
« Reply #11 on: January 12, 2012, 01:58:58 am »

Hi All,

Please help with a subject that has been discussed here before...

Several years ago there was a significant thread about hearing damage, and whether low, mid and high frequencies at the same db level do the same amount of damage.

Can anybody point me to the thread(s), and or good literature on the subject?

I do know about the different perception of frequencies as show by Fletcher~Munson,
and the ISO 2003 hearing curve:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equal-loudness_contour

Thanks and good health,  Weogo

Is this one of the links you were talking about? http://srforums.prosoundweb.com/index.php/m/95472/21640/

This one is also interesting: http://srforums.prosoundweb.com/index.php/mv/msg/48458/0/0/0/
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Marty McCann

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Re: hearing damage, the same or different at different frequencies?
« Reply #12 on: January 12, 2012, 03:21:41 pm »

[quote author=Elliot Thompson

Iíve discovered my dislike of 2.5 kHz ever since I was 13 so, I would imagine if this was indeed an early incarnation of hearing damage my hearing would not be able to detect 20 kHz at 31 much less be irritated by 17 kHz (17739.689 kHz ).


[/quote]

Hello Elliot,

I do not want to rain on your parade . . .  I seriously doubt that you can actually perceive a 20 kHz tone.

They used to test up to 10 kHz in hearing tests.  Now they only test up to 8 kHz.  I have a document from the University of Southern Mississippi that states that I am qualified to conduct an audio-metric hearing test.

Uh, and what oscillator or frequency counter did you use that has a 3 decimal place resolution? 

Don't burst a Scilla root cell in your Basilar Membrane now but can you hear this . . . . .  bullshit



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Dan Richardson

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Re: hearing damage, the same or different at different frequencies?
« Reply #13 on: January 12, 2012, 09:19:49 pm »

I seriously doubt that you can actually perceive a 20 kHz tone.

They used to test up to 10 kHz in hearing tests.  Now they only test up to 8 kHz.  I have a document from the University of Southern Mississippi that states that I am qualified to conduct an audio-metric hearing test.

If you can't hear above 8k, you're in the wrong business or at least reading the wrong forum.

The majority of audiologists are only testing for speech range intelligibility.

Many people can hear the flyback transformer on a tube TV, 15.734 kHz for NTSC and 15.625 for PAL.
I expect his irritant frequency is likewise a tone specifically generated by some piece of gear.


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Re: hearing damage, the same or different at different frequencies?
« Reply #14 on: January 12, 2012, 09:52:09 pm »

If you can't hear above 8k, you've been in the business too long.

Another possibility.........
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brian maddox

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Re: hearing damage, the same or different at different frequencies?
« Reply #15 on: January 12, 2012, 11:46:06 pm »

Many people can hear the flyback transformer on a tube TV, 15.734 kHz for NTSC and 15.625 for PAL.

yeah, that one i can hear loud and clear.  i was so happy when the vidiots went to lcd panels.  hooking up comm in video village when they were using all glass monitors was like putting a tiny ice pick through my head...
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Elliot Thompson

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Re: hearing damage, the same or different at different frequencies?
« Reply #16 on: January 13, 2012, 02:59:12 pm »

[quote author=Elliot Thompson

I’ve discovered my dislike of 2.5 kHz ever since I was 13 so, I would imagine if this was indeed an early incarnation of hearing damage my hearing would not be able to detect 20 kHz at 31 much less be irritated by 17 kHz (17739.689 kHz ).




Hello Elliot,

I do not want to rain on your parade . . .  I seriously doubt that you can actually perceive a 20 kHz tone.

They used to test up to 10 kHz in hearing tests.  Now they only test up to 8 kHz.  I have a document from the University of Southern Mississippi that states that I am qualified to conduct an audio-metric hearing test.

Uh, and what oscillator or frequency counter did you use that has a 3 decimal place resolution? 

Don't burst a Scilla root cell in your Basilar Membrane now but can you hear this . . . . .  bullshit

With the right amount of dB gain and a loudspeaker that can deliver ultra high frequencies I have no problem detecting anything ranging from 17 kHz to 20 kHz.

Around a year ago, I had a CD Player that offered a 19 kHz spike while idling all courtesy of the blinking LCD buttons. I’ve encountered a few fluorescent lights with ballasts that offered similar but not as piercing (possibly on the brink of dieing) when such a combination was popular.

There is nothing worse than hearing a very sharp high-pitched squeal that leaves a nauseating feeling throughout your body.

The Oscillator that offers a three decimal point is program I downloaded in 1998. It is called NCH Tone Generator. http://www.nch.com.au/tonegen/index.html

Best Regards,   
« Last Edit: January 13, 2012, 03:01:10 pm by Elliot Thompson »
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Chris Davis

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Re: hearing damage, the same or different at different frequencies?
« Reply #17 on: January 13, 2012, 04:18:36 pm »

With the right amount of dB gain and a loudspeaker that can deliver ultra high frequencies I have no problem detecting anything ranging from 17 kHz to 20 kHz.

Around a year ago, I had a CD Player that offered a 19 kHz spike while idling all courtesy of the blinking LCD buttons. Iíve encountered a few fluorescent lights with ballasts that offered similar but not as piercing (possibly on the brink of dieing) when such a combination was popular.

There is nothing worse than hearing a very sharp high-pitched squeal that leaves a nauseating feeling throughout your body.

The Oscillator that offers a three decimal point is program I downloaded in 1998. It is called NCH Tone Generator. http://www.nch.com.au/tonegen/index.html

Best Regards,   


+1 on the bit about hight pitched noise creating a nauseating feeling.   
I used to work in an area that had 20+ year old computer monitors that were on their way out, having been powered up 24/7 for their entire existence.  That was the source of the most noticeable effect I ever experienced. 
At first it took me a while to figure out where it was coming from.  I would be fine one minute, then the next I was felt like I was getting dizzy. My take on it is that over time I was confusing the sound of the old CRTs for the sensation of equilibrium being lost in my ears.   
I was getting tormented from old CRTs about 30 feet or more across the room.  Also I noticed they were often highly directional, move just a couple feet this way or that and it changes.  That is what made it difficult for me to pinpoint at first. (I thought maybe it might have been the overhead lighting)
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George Friedman-Jimenez

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Re: hearing damage, the same or different at different frequencies?
« Reply #18 on: January 13, 2012, 05:26:55 pm »

That is very interesting. Given the symptoms you describe, it is possible that that high pitched sound was actually at a high SPL. Has anyone here actually measured the SPL of that CRT noise?
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Dan Richardson

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Re: hearing damage, the same or different at different frequencies?
« Reply #19 on: January 13, 2012, 06:12:28 pm »

it is possible that that high pitched sound was actually at a high SPL. Has anyone here actually measured the SPL of that CRT noise?

It's extremely variable, unit by unit, case by case. Some CRTs are incredibly loud, others are not.
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