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Author Topic: Different or unusual mic practices  (Read 14256 times)

kristianjohnsen

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Re: Different or unusual mic practices
« Reply #40 on: December 14, 2011, 08:27:08 am »

That is interesting. I have never tried going omni, but I know one drummer who will play the hardware and shells as well as the heads, and do open handed stuff with his fingers on both the drums and his body. That should compliment the overheads nicely.

I was house tech at a gig with a well-known Norwegian artist that had a single mic (possibly a Sennheiser e609) placed similarly to what Tim described.  This mic was connected to a guitar amp (seem to recall it was a Marshall 4x12") and that cab was in turn mic'es with a SM57.  It was used as an effect on one song as far as I know.
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Dan Richardson

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Re: Different or unusual mic practices
« Reply #41 on: December 14, 2011, 10:28:51 am »

Whenever the right band comes around, I like to mic the drum kit with a pair of overheads and something in the kick, but the real secret sauce is using an omni dynamic (EV 635a for me) right over the batter side hoop of the kick drum kinda close to the drummers knee.

Toured for a while with a very quiet band whose kit was kick snare hat rack. No cymbals.
Crown GLM omni peeking over the back side of the snare and M88 in the kick.
Two channels. Sounded gorgeous.

In some situations I still go for a single overhead, as close to the drummer's head as I can get away with.
Listen from where they're listening, and let them "mix" it. Add kick to taste. Sorted.
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Re: Different or unusual mic practices
« Reply #42 on: December 14, 2011, 01:08:25 pm »

Whenever the right band comes around, I like to mic the drum kit with a pair of overheads and something in the kick, but the real secret sauce is using an omni dynamic (EV 635a for me) right over the batter side hoop of the kick drum kinda close to the drummers knee. Comp the hell out of this mic and blend it with the overheads. Really makes a great "whole kit" sound. The omni picks up all the body from the shells and really gives the overhead sound a lot of weight.

I've been doing this occasionally for live broadcast.....if the drummer could live with it.  Some can, some can't.  I believe this technique has been attributed to an East Coast studio doing jazz, possibly Capitol Records.  Anyone know? 
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Tim Weaver

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Re: Different or unusual mic practices
« Reply #43 on: December 14, 2011, 01:53:41 pm »

I've been doing this occasionally for live broadcast.....if the drummer could live with it.  Some can, some can't.  I believe this technique has been attributed to an East Coast studio doing jazz, possibly Capitol Records.  Anyone know?

I learned about it from a studio guy. That's all I know about the technique.

As far as the drummer living with it or not, it depends on how much they want in the monitor, and how tight the kit is set up. It's much easier to do if there is only 1 rack tom.
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Re: Different or unusual mic practices
« Reply #44 on: December 14, 2011, 01:58:33 pm »


As far as the drummer living with it or not, it depends on how much they want in the monitor, and how tight the kit is set up. It's much easier to do if there is only 1 rack tom.

I was referring to whether or not they could deal with the physical presence of the mic.  Some just need the space free and don't want anything in there. 

And I've never had to use that technique and do monitors.........fortunately.  I wouldn't want to try it.  Broadcast and recording only, thanks.
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Craig Leerman

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Re: Different or unusual mic practices
« Reply #45 on: December 16, 2011, 03:47:55 pm »

Hi everybody

The editors Live Sound International magazine are thinking this topic would make a great article for the Jan issue and were wondering if you guys had any pictures showing the techniques talked about.  If you do, the bigger the pic the better as they need to be a certain size to be able to translate to print well.  You can post em here, or PM me with a larger one, and post a smaller one here on the forum so everybody can see what you are talking about.

Thanks
Craig
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Stu McDoniel

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Re: Different or unusual mic practices
« Reply #46 on: December 16, 2011, 07:53:39 pm »

Sebas has given a good suggestion.  I use a much simpler and cheaper method:

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/Pro70

One of these dropped inside the body of the instrument.  If it was a solo performer I'd do what Sebas suggests.  But the only ones I encounter commonly (attempt to) play in an ensemble.

Edit:

Actually, mine are the older Pro 7a's which went for less than $80/each.  But they're battery only.  The 70's will take phantom.
I use an EV mic identical to this setup and clip it to the F hole of stand up bass/es at a large Bluegrass Fest I do every year.  The user clips
the other part to there pants/belt.  Works great!   
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Patrick Tracy

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Re: Different or unusual mic practices
« Reply #47 on: December 17, 2011, 01:16:15 am »

PZM in the back of a combo amp, resting on the lower back panel at approximately 30 from vertical (matching the cone angle?). I was short on time and mics and stands so I just stuck them in both amps and it sounded better than I'd hoped. Made for a clean looking stage as well.

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Re: Different or unusual mic practices
« Reply #47 on: December 17, 2011, 01:16:15 am »


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