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Author Topic: Different or unusual mic practices  (Read 14250 times)

kristianjohnsen

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Re: Different or unusual mic practices
« Reply #20 on: December 12, 2011, 04:58:18 am »

Two mics inside the upper section of a Leslie that catches the horn coming and going.

I always wondered about Leslies:  If we do the usual "2 mics on the horn" approach won't that equate to the horn running at twice the speed?  I mean, if I stand next to the cabinet I'll hear the horn every time it's poiting at me.  If I mic the cabinet on both sides and I listen to the mics in a headset I'll hear the horn every time it's pointing at a mic, which is twice as often.  Or am I confusing myself?
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Bob Leonard

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Re: Different or unusual mic practices
« Reply #21 on: December 12, 2011, 07:15:00 am »

The horn spins to fast. Using two mics seperated by the width of the cabinet has always given me a more natural sounding effect without chopping the sound. The rotary effect remains intact without doubling.
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kristianjohnsen

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Re: Different or unusual mic practices
« Reply #22 on: December 12, 2011, 07:20:29 am »

The horn spins to fast. Using two mics seperated by the width of the cabinet has always given me a more natural sounding effect without chopping the sound. The rotary effect remains intact without doubling.

As I'm thinking more about this it would probably make sense to use a mic with a fairly wide pick-up-pattern as to avoid the chopping and get more of the "coming-and-going" effect that we hear from a distance.

I'm still confused as to why two mics sound better than one, based on my observations from before, but agree that most people seem to have best results when using two mics.
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Scott Middleton

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Re: Different or unusual mic practices
« Reply #23 on: December 12, 2011, 10:49:52 am »

I use 2 mics (in a DIN stereo arrangement, not on opposite sides) on the top because I pan them slightly.  If it's mono rig, then just one on each rotor.  I also like them off axis of the top rotor, makes for less chop.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2011, 10:51:58 am by Scott Middleton »
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Dan Richardson

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Re: Different or unusual mic practices
« Reply #24 on: December 12, 2011, 12:37:31 pm »

As I'm thinking more about this it would probably make sense to use a mic with a fairly wide pick-up-pattern as to avoid the chopping and get more of the "coming-and-going" effect that we hear from a distance.

I'm still confused as to why two mics sound better than one, based on my observations from before, but agree that most people seem to have best results when using two mics.

Whatever single mic you use is still way too close to the source.
The difference between "horn 2 inches from mic" and "horn pointed away from mic"
is many times larger than the difference you hear from 10 feet away.
Dual mics hard panned make an interesting effect, and convey motion.

Even dual micing pales next to the experience of listening to the Leslie itself in an appropriate room.
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Glen Kelley

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Re: Different or unusual mic practices
« Reply #25 on: December 12, 2011, 01:12:05 pm »

SM91 slipped under the strings of a hammered dulcimer, added a 57 at the top for the highest treble tones.  Finally.......usable level of sound from a difficult instrument.

Placing a mic at just the right distance from the line directly under a center cluster to cancel the standing wave.

Dick, have you found a reliable way to mic a lap (mountain) dulcimer? This instrument seems to be almost impossible to amplify if the player does not have a pickup installed. Any ideas?
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g'bye, Dick Rees

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Re: Different or unusual mic practices
« Reply #26 on: December 12, 2011, 01:35:31 pm »



Even dual micing pales next to the experience of listening to the Leslie itself in an appropriate room.

Dan....

How about using a reverb with very short tail and playing with the pre-delay to try to emulate some room reflections?  Adjust depth and FX onset time to taste.......

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See my tag line......
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Scott Helmke

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Re: Different or unusual mic practices
« Reply #27 on: December 12, 2011, 03:53:11 pm »

I always wondered about Leslies:  If we do the usual "2 mics on the horn" approach won't that equate to the horn running at twice the speed?  I mean, if I stand next to the cabinet I'll hear the horn every time it's poiting at me.  If I mic the cabinet on both sides and I listen to the mics in a headset I'll hear the horn every time it's pointing at a mic, which is twice as often.  Or am I confusing myself?

Only one of the two horns actually passes sound.  The other one is just for physical balance.
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Bob Leonard

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Re: Different or unusual mic practices
« Reply #28 on: December 12, 2011, 05:17:35 pm »

Only one of the two horns actually passes sound.  The other one is just for physical balance.

Correct, and that's one reason a pair of mics sounds best IMO. The horn spins past a single mic and there is no additional rise in sound for a full rotation. With the pair set inside the cabinet properly on either side you have a full 90 degrees of sound which conveys a much more natural up and down / far and near volume/sound effect.
 
I had used 57s for this in the past because not a whole lot of choices existed at the time and back in the late 60's using some silver colored Shure mic which I don't remember the name of. Now I use PR-22s and the sound is as good as I can get it.
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kristianjohnsen

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Re: Different or unusual mic practices
« Reply #29 on: December 12, 2011, 05:23:16 pm »

Only one of the two horns actually passes sound.  The other one is just for physical balance.

I realize this, but how does that contribute to the discussion?  When you stand next to a Leslie cab listening to it, you're in one location and for every revolution of the horn it passes you once.  Mic it on both sides and for every revolution the horn passes two mics and each one conveys the sound of the passing of the horn to the listeners.  This seems to be twice as often as when you are standing in one location listening, no?
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Re: Different or unusual mic practices
« Reply #29 on: December 12, 2011, 05:23:16 pm »


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