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Author Topic: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding  (Read 27248 times)

Kurt Kesler

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Re: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding
« Reply #40 on: December 01, 2011, 08:54:28 am »

Also , in practice, I don't want help coiling cables. Any time saved by the help is usually lost on the next show when I have to uncoil them.

I'm usually a one man operation as well but sometimes you get uninvited "help".  One night as I went to the trailer to get something during the load out a self appointed helper grabbed all the cables, wadded them up in a big ball and stuffed them in the box.  Most helpful.
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Geoff Doane

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Re: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding
« Reply #41 on: December 01, 2011, 12:15:32 pm »

I know belden makes multi with IJ pairs that are resistor color coded. I have some 3 pair.

Along with Belden, Gepco also has colour coded jackets on each pair.

Canare uses a slight variation on the same theme, with a black jacket and then a stripe running along the jacket.  From 10-19, the jacket is brown, and so on.  I think Mogami also has a similar scheme.

GTD
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Dave Dermont

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Re: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding
« Reply #42 on: December 05, 2011, 08:14:25 pm »

Who, please?  I'd like to get some of that cable for my next project.

Wireworks and Clark Wire & Cable
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Stu McDoniel

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Re: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding
« Reply #43 on: December 06, 2011, 04:12:50 pm »

The longest part of load out at the end of the night is winding mic cables. I work alone and this seems to be 80% it. I was thinking of winding in groups, i.e. front stage mics and monitors (jbl prx) and backstage mics and monitors (jbl prx ) Does anyone have other suggestions which could save me some time at the end of the night with that part of the tear down? It's not feasible right now to hire more RELIABLE help.

John
You can get lots of 100
Use these to tie up your mic cables.. wind cable up in a nice round loop...put the ball bungie or two on the cable..your good to go

These work well...............
The link is an example...shop wisely for prices

http://www.amazon.com/Black-Ball-Bungies-Package-100/dp/B001BNS5P2

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Charlie Zureki

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Re: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding
« Reply #44 on: December 12, 2011, 10:01:02 am »

I have never really understood this fascination with the resistor code. I guess because they had to learn it in middle school shop class people feel inclined to use it.

I don't really think it is all that hard to look at a 10 foot coiled cable and a 20 foot coiled cable and tell which is longer.

Also , in practice, I don't want help coiling cables. Any time saved by the help is usually lost on the next show when I have to uncoil them.

  Hello Jay,

  No...the "fascination" with using the resistor color code for marking lengths of cable... got it's start back in the early days of Remote Television and Sound systems for hire.  Unlike today, much of the gear was "custom" gear, made by Radio,and early Television Techs.  The Techs having Electronic backgrounds, used the resistor color code, because it was easily understood by other experienced Technicians.

   BTW...the color code was also used by some Capacitor Manufacturers to designate their component's values....easily understood by Techs already knowing the color code.

   If a provider is a smaller company with limited gear, then, it may not make any difference whether they color code their lengths of Mic or Edison cables. But, if one were to be a large System Provider and have trunks full of cables...it really can save time when searching for an appropriate length cable, especially under a stage, in dim light....

  In my experience, the biggest reason to color code and lable cables is to help keep my cables from walking away...

  FWIW...I have found only three lengths appropriate... 15 ft,  35 ft and 100 ft (rarely used) mic cables and all Edison/powercons are 75' except the Foh run.

   Cheers,
   Hammer   
             

   

   
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Jay Barracato

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Re: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding
« Reply #45 on: December 12, 2011, 11:48:19 am »

    FWIW...I have found only three lengths appropriate... 15 ft,  35 ft and 100 ft (rarely used) mic cables and all Edison/powercons are 75' except the Foh run.

   Cheers,
   Hammer   
             

Well I was being a little sarcastic, but this seems to reinforce my point.You really don't need a base ten color system if you only have three categories. I am sure most of the average stage workers weren't thinking about the value, all they need is "toss the red cables in that truck".

I have nothing against color codes, I find it funny how much of an emotional link many people seem to have for a very specific categorical system, applied to new situations.

I am half tempted to go through an label all mine using the resistor color code, but with some bizarre unit of length like fathoms.
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Jay Barracato

Tim McCulloch

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Re: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding
« Reply #46 on: December 12, 2011, 12:03:39 pm »

Well I was being a little sarcastic, but this seems to reinforce my point.You really don't need a base ten color system if you only have three categories. I am sure most of the average stage workers weren't thinking about the value, all they need is "toss the red cables in that truck".

I have nothing against color codes, I find it funny how much of an emotional link many people seem to have for a very specific categorical system, applied to new situations.

I am half tempted to go through an label all mine using the resistor color code, but with some bizarre unit of length like fathoms.

Go for big numbers, measure in angstroms.
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Jay Barracato

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Re: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding
« Reply #47 on: December 12, 2011, 05:59:57 pm »

Go for big numbers, measure in angstroms.

The entire length of the cable would end up looking like a zebra.
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Jay Barracato

Charlie Zureki

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Re: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding
« Reply #48 on: December 13, 2011, 11:22:59 am »

Well I was being a little sarcastic, but this seems to reinforce my point.You really don't need a base ten color system if you only have three categories. I am sure most of the average stage workers weren't thinking about the value, all they need is "toss the red cables in that truck".

I have nothing against color codes, I find it funny how much of an emotional link many people seem to have for a very specific categorical system, applied to new situations.

I am half tempted to go through an label all mine using the resistor color code, but with some bizarre unit of length like fathoms.

  Hello Jay,

   My previous post was an explanation of why/where the resistor color code was used. It was directed to you because you didn't seem to make the connection of why it became a standard for many Sound, Lighting and Video Providers, along with other Electrical/Electronic Industries.

  It's not a standard in the tradional sense, there are no IEC or NEC codes. It just became a practice in the Larger Touring Companies because of ease of implementation and a wide knowledge of the Resistor Color codes.

   A Sound, Video, or Lighting Company is free to use whatever colors, or none at all for length designation of any cables.  But, some feel it may make load ins/load outs easier if they ever have a need to cross-rent gear.

  My three lengths of cable are color marked for the reasons I described in my other post...low light conditions, packing/unpacking trunks and hands can visually understand the lengths by sight. I can tell a hand "grab 6 Yellows for the Guitars, 8 reds for Keyboards" etc...

   Since my Mic cable lengths come in only 3 sizes and are not made in even 10ft lengths....my cables are not faithful to the resistor color code...  Red (15ft), Yellow(35ft) & No color(100ft) .  I'm certain many Companies do not faithfully use the resistor color code.  It's not important..until it gets important...cross renting, multiple stages, multiple gigs the same day, extra hands...

   Hammer

   

   
   
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Patrick Campbell

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Re: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding
« Reply #49 on: February 25, 2012, 07:43:38 am »

I have all 20 and 30 ft on this reel ..........

5 ft 'ers go into the mic case

This works well and saves time.......ya got to handle em gently but it works for me for years

Patrick
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Re: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding
« Reply #49 on: February 25, 2012, 07:43:38 am »


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