ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 7   Go Down

Author Topic: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding  (Read 24798 times)

Bob Charest

  • Lab Lounge
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 813
  • Westbrook ME, USA
    • Bob Charest Band
Re: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding
« Reply #20 on: November 24, 2011, 09:45:26 am »

++

Not sure if anyone has added this additional reason to use quick disconnects for mic's: they also protect the threads on the stands.

All-in-all ..... a very good idea and real time saver.
And the same reasons for the shaft/base connection: the Atlas QR2
Logged

Pete Erskine

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1319
    • Best Audio
Re: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding
« Reply #21 on: November 25, 2011, 01:40:46 pm »

Many of these ideas will work if you are a small band or audio shop and you expect to always be doing your own cable coiling.  In the professional world, the reality is that many people coil the cables after a show.  The standard world wide for coiling cable is called over-under.  It works for big bundles of cable as well as small 10 foot cables.  EVERY good production crew member knows how to do this.  It protects your cables, it's very fast and when the time comes to use the cable again, it uncoils without any kinks.

One slight danger in uncoiling a cable wrapped this way is - if you start to uncoil and have inadvertently pulled the cable through the coil from the wrong side it comes out with knots in it every 3 feet :P - Just pull the end back through the coil and all will be well.

Here is a you-tube video which explains and demonstrates the method. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3j1Wdc-ymbI

Mine technique is similar but I never let go if the cable and once learned you can coil cables hundreds of feet in length at ease very quickly and almost without thinking.  When the coil gets too big to hold, slide it up your arm and grab the last few coils and continue.  With heavy cables the same thing can be done on the floor.
Logged
Pete Erskine
917-750-1134
www.bestaudio.com
peter@bestaudio.com

Tim Padrick

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 909
  • Indianapolis
    • T.P. Audio
Re: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding
« Reply #22 on: November 26, 2011, 05:58:30 am »

Mine technique is similar but I never let go if the cable and once learned you can coil cables hundreds of feet in length at ease very quickly and almost without thinking.  When the coil gets too big to hold, slide it up your arm and grab the last few coils and continue.  With heavy cables the same thing can be done on the floor.

The secret to easy coiling of long cables is to start in the middle: Coil to one end, flip the cable around in your hand, and coil to the other end.
Logged

Dave Rickard

  • SR Forums
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 102
Re: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding
« Reply #23 on: November 27, 2011, 01:07:42 am »

I use small crews and rarely do the same show twice.  I have multiple reels for different lengths. Many 25' reels, some 50', a 100', and I coil the 10 footers.  Even volunteers can do this this quickly and correctly.  As Ivan said, male end goes on first.

I use these--  http://www.acetogo.com/product/cord-reel-wstand-150-or.html
Logged
The wrong piece of gear at the right price, is still the wrong piece of gear.

Dave Dermont

  • Forum Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 365
  • From The Great Pocono Northeast
Re: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding
« Reply #24 on: November 27, 2011, 05:04:07 pm »

Yes, sub snakes are wonderful things.

I've worked with people who do the mic cable reel thing, and I just don't get it.

Yeah, it's a nice way to transport and store cables, but when it comes to setup and strike, it makes the job take longer.

Let's go over the cable reel procedure at the end of the gig, and all the cables are laid out on stage. You have to free every individual cable, then take it to a central location (the reel) to wind it.

By the time you have one cable free and walk over to the reel to wind it, I can have four cables wrapped and waiting to go into the cable trunk.

No, I am not some sort of stage crew wizard. (trust me on this) I am just a guy who knows how to wrap a cable.

C'mon people, just learn how to wrap cables! Take some home and practice if you have to. Heck, while you're at it, grab a hunk of rope and practice how to tie a bowline.

Hey, has anyone ever noticed that on big shows done by major sound companies you never ever see mic cables on a reel?

You do occasionally see a broadcaster with some really really long cables on reels, but they are usually skinny cables that have BNC connectors on them for those mysterious things that only broadcasters know about.
Logged
Dave Dermont

Warning: Dates on calendar may be closer than they appear

Justin Bartlett

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 177
Re: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding
« Reply #25 on: November 27, 2011, 05:23:11 pm »

Yes, sub snakes are wonderful things.

I've worked with people who do the mic cable reel thing, and I just don't get it.

Yeah, it's a nice way to transport and store cables, but when it comes to setup and strike, it makes the job take longer.

Let's go over the cable reel procedure at the end of the gig, and all the cables are laid out on stage. You have to free every individual cable, then take it to a central location (the reel) to wind it.

By the time you have one cable free and walk over to the reel to wind it, I can have four cables wrapped and waiting to go into the cable trunk.

No, I am not some sort of stage crew wizard. (trust me on this) I am just a guy who knows how to wrap a cable.

C'mon people, just learn how to wrap cables! Take some home and practice if you have to. Heck, while you're at it, grab a hunk of rope and practice how to tie a bowline.

Hey, has anyone ever noticed that on big shows done by major sound companies you never ever see mic cables on a reel?

You do occasionally see a broadcaster with some really really long cables on reels, but they are usually skinny cables that have BNC connectors on them for those mysterious things that only broadcasters know about.

I was recently on a small-ish (bus & trailer) tour where we used reels (http://www.acetogo.com/product/cord-reel-100orange.html) for our mic cables.  In our case, our load-out crew was mostly local volunteers, and they frequently knew nothing about wrapping cables.  It was quicker to show them how to use the reels than it was to try to teach them proper over-under technique.  These reels are handheld, so there was no need to walk them to any central location; we had about 6 of them.  Worked like a charm for our particular needs.
Logged

Ivan Beaver

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 8846
  • Atlanta GA
Re: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding
« Reply #26 on: November 27, 2011, 06:27:42 pm »

I was recently on a small-ish (bus & trailer) tour where we used reels (http://www.acetogo.com/product/cord-reel-100orange.html) for our mic cables.  In our case, our load-out crew was mostly local volunteers, and they frequently knew nothing about wrapping cables.  It was quicker to show them how to use the reels than it was to try to teach them proper over-under technique.  These reels are handheld, so there was no need to walk them to any central location; we had about 6 of them.  Worked like a charm for our particular needs.
I tried that type once.  They took up way to much space and weren't exactly the fastest way to coil cables. 

They also put a strain on the XLR cables because the internal diameter is so small.  For a single extension cable they work OK, but I still prefer to just coil the cables over using those.

But as long as you don't have to many, they might could work.

Glad they worked for you.
Logged
A complex question is easily answered by a simple-easy to understand WRONG answer!

Ivan Beaver
Danley Sound Labs

PHYSICS- NOT FADS!

Dave Dermont

  • Forum Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 365
  • From The Great Pocono Northeast
Re: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding
« Reply #27 on: November 27, 2011, 06:29:26 pm »

I was recently on a small-ish (bus & trailer) tour where we used reels (http://www.acetogo.com/product/cord-reel-100orange.html) for our mic cables.  In our case, our load-out crew was mostly local volunteers, and they frequently knew nothing about wrapping cables.  It was quicker to show them how to use the reels than it was to try to teach them proper over-under technique.  These reels are handheld, so there was no need to walk them to any central location; we had about 6 of them.  Worked like a charm for our particular needs.

That's all fine, but the original post was made by a guy who wanted to find a way to strike and load out faster when working alone. That's different than trying to train a different group of monkeys every night.

If I was in a situation like what you describe above, I'd just say "That's OK, we'll wrap the cables", and then have someone direct the local load-out crew in the actual loading out.

A truck/trailer pack with the cable trunk near the back end will prepare you for this contingency.

Besides, everybody knows that some local crew people can destroy a cable just by being in the same room with it.
Logged
Dave Dermont

Warning: Dates on calendar may be closer than they appear

John Roll

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 227
Re: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding
« Reply #28 on: November 27, 2011, 07:52:51 pm »

Besides, everybody knows that some local crew people can destroy a cable just by being in the same room with it.

That's priceless......
Logged
John Roll
JMR Pro Audio

QSC, JBL, Presonus, Audix, K&M, EWI, Furman

Ivan Beaver

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 8846
  • Atlanta GA
Re: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding
« Reply #29 on: November 27, 2011, 09:13:29 pm »


Besides, everybody knows that some local crew people can destroy a cable just by being in the same room with it.
I've run into those guys.

"WHY would you do THAT?"  "Not even close"  "Says who?" are some comments that come to mind.
Logged
A complex question is easily answered by a simple-easy to understand WRONG answer!

Ivan Beaver
Danley Sound Labs

PHYSICS- NOT FADS!

ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Load Out advice - Mic cable winding
« Reply #29 on: November 27, 2011, 09:13:29 pm »


Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 7   Go Up
 



Page created in 0.107 seconds with 22 queries.