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Author Topic: guitar amps on stage  (Read 12224 times)

Art Welter

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Re: guitar amps on stage
« Reply #10 on: January 22, 2011, 02:07:24 pm »

Tim Padrick wrote on Fri, 21 January 2011 23:25

Putting open back amps in front of the players is fine, so long as you don't mind that the folks in the front rows can't hear anything but guitar.

We are talking about small stages here, I'd rather be four feet from the back of an open back speaker than 10 feet from one beaming directly in my face. Most of the 2-4K icepick comes off the center of the cone.
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Tim Padrick

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Re: guitar amps on stage
« Reply #11 on: January 23, 2011, 03:44:23 pm »

Art Welter wrote on Sat, 22 January 2011 13:07

Tim Padrick wrote on Fri, 21 January 2011 23:25

Putting open back amps in front of the players is fine, so long as you don't mind that the folks in the front rows can't hear anything but guitar.

We are talking about small stages here, I'd rather be four feet from the back of an open back speaker than 10 feet from one beaming directly in my face. Most of the 2-4K icepick comes off the center of the cone.


You make a valid point.  I think either would make for a less than fun night though.

Ned Ward

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Re: guitar amps on stage
« Reply #12 on: January 25, 2011, 01:10:55 am »

Doyle Smith wrote on Thu, 20 January 2011 08:06

When our guitar amps are onstage (and our stages are small little "bar" stages) directly behind the vocal mics and are usually turned up LOUD, there is a lot of bleed into the vocal mics.  The amps themselves are usually mic'ed and mixed on their own inputs into the PA.  Is there a downside into putting the guitar mics in front of the player facing him in the null of the vocal mic? Does the open back amp cabinet create significant phase cancellation for the FOH?  



Since no one has asked, what guitar amps are you talking about, and if they're mic'd into the PA, why do they need to be so loud?

I have a Mini Z, Princeton, princeton Reverb, and a Bandmaster, amps ranging from 5 to 40 watts. Each has its place based on the size stage, how much is running through the PA. Even the Bandmaster has a Dr. Z BrakeLite attenuator to lower its volume while still getting power tube goodness.

Turn your amps down, or get an amp tilter so that you're not blasting the amps into your ankles.
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Ben Brunskill

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Re: guitar amps on stage
« Reply #13 on: January 28, 2011, 04:37:26 pm »

As a guitarist, I always shoot my amp sideways across stage, aiming away from any microphones that could pick up bleed.
And I run it a a low volume, and rely on IEM's for monitoring.

That way, it can be loud in my head, but there's no or very little bleed.
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Joe Brugnoni

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Re: guitar amps on stage
« Reply #14 on: January 30, 2011, 10:39:47 am »

I have been in bands that have done all the methods mentioned above,  I always liked the Small amp leaned back on the front of the stage the best.

we had two guitar players in a band a while back and tried the side fill amp, It worked ok except the volume was a lot higher as the guitar players, where hearing the other guys amp better than their own, so with two, you may need to raise them up closer to ear level or place the amps on the opposite end of the stage from the guitar player it belongs to. So they can hear it.

I was doing sound at a venue in KC and we had some baffles to place in front of the amps, they where made out of some kind of carpet and plywood. I do not think plexglas will do as well as these do.

 I found if I used these and placed them out in front of the amp, a couple of really nice things happened.

One, it killed the blast zone right out in front.

Two the guitar players liked it, with this baffle placed 12 to 24 inches in front of the amp, they could hear it, it did not effect the tone much and in some cases they could turn up a bit.

Three  I also found that I could move the mic away from the amp and in the case of a combo with two speakers I could sort of capture both speakers and the mic was kind of isolated from other things and did not seem to pick up much stage wash from drums or other things,
I do not  like amps leaned back at the rear of the stage as it seems, they are always aimed right into a vocal mic.

Most of these are combo amps.  
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Mikhail Fassakhov

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Re: guitar amps on stage
« Reply #15 on: February 15, 2011, 01:56:32 am »

Try to raise the amp, or tilt it, so it is pointing at your ears.
There's nothing wrong with a little bleed coming into your vocal mix, but the reverb from a turned around guitar amp can ruin the sound in the small club.
There's a general idea of stage volume, that I try to get with bands- starts with a drummer, because he is usually the loudest one, then add the volume of guitar amp to the point where both of you hear what's going on, add a bass amp with the same idea, and then ask for the vocals in the wedges- done! At this time you should be getting a decent mix coming out from the stage, and the only job the soundguy has is not to ruin it!
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