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Author Topic: Moving Head Lights  (Read 1797 times)

Zach Zaba

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Moving Head Lights
« on: December 12, 2010, 09:58:59 pm »

Pretty basic question but I have recently been turned on to moving head lights. I am about to have them lent to me but was wondering how you get so a continuous motion of of the (rotating, swirling etc.)

Would there be a "frame" for each section of motion making a continuous stream or is there a channel on some that rotates them?



Take for example the 1:20 minute mark of the following Umprey's video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6fg8vs6jDug&feature=relat ed
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Tony "T" Tissot

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Re: Moving Head Lights
« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2010, 03:07:44 am »

Zach Zaba wrote on Sun, 12 December 2010 18:58

Pretty basic question but I have recently been turned on to moving head lights. I am about to have them lent to me but was wondering how you get so a continuous motion of of the (rotating, swirling etc.)

Would there be a "frame" for each section of motion making a continuous stream or is there a channel on some that rotates them?



Take for example the 1:20 minute mark of the following Umprey's video:

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6fg8vs6jDug&feature=relat ed

It is a continuous stream of data. All via the DMX sent from your lightboard/controller/console.

The "onboard" stuff is always a non-starter.

Your controller will send azimuth, elevation, rate, etc.  
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Matthew Haber

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Re: Moving Head Lights
« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2010, 12:16:31 pm »

Worth noting is that the sorts of light boards that you would want to use with movers have built in functionality (often called FXs) to produce these sorts of motions without manually programming the thousands of individual steps.
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