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Author Topic: Wiring job finish, Helsyn  (Read 7477 times)

Hal Bissinger/COMSYSTEC

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Re: Wiring job finish, Helsyn
« Reply #10 on: December 08, 2010, 07:21:50 pm »

I can apply a sleeve to the end of the stripped cable, and a few minutes later, slide the PVC tubing over the drain wire. If I change my mind, and decide I want a longer piece of PVC, I can simply pull the short one off, and replace it with a longer one, without having to install a new sleeve.

Are you saying that you slide the expanded end sleeving onto the cable, sleeve your drain wire, terminate the cable then "un-expand" the sleeve? Sounds like a lot of work to me.

I think the answer to that is to leave the wires plenty long to begin with along with the sleeved drain wire and shrink the end cap over all of it. Then you cut to length the drain wire and  strip the PVC sleeving off the drain wire where you need to with your strippers, just like the other wires in the cable. If I had to fuss with re-dressing the cable ends because it's too short it means I screwed up someplace. But that's just me. With shrink sleeving and the above method you can shrink multiple cables at once, cut, strip and terminate. Been doing it that way for over 40 years and never melted or burned a cable.

That said, whatever floats your boat. But there must be a reason why that stuff is hard to get and not seen in the US and I'm willing to bet it's because it's not very popular.

-Hal

Geoff Doane

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Re: Wiring job finish, Helsyn
« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2010, 09:39:48 pm »

Hal Bissinger/COMSYSTEC wrote on Wed, 08 December 2010 20:21

Are you saying that you slide the expanded end sleeving onto the cable, sleeve your drain wire, terminate the cable then "un-expand" the sleeve? Sounds like a lot of work to me.



No, once the sleeve is on the cable I wouldn't likely do anything more with it, but because it isn't yet tight like heatshrink would be, it's possible to slip the "spaghetti" tubing over the drain wire afterwards instead of before.

The particular "spaghetti" tubing we use is not exactly teflon or PVC, but something in between.  It doesn't strip easily.  You're much better off just cutting it to length, and then slipping it over the drain wire.

Here are some photo examples.  The Hellerman sleeves are the grey things around the wire where the jacket was stripped off.

index.php/fa/34120/0/

On this job I was replacing a MASS insert with a new (old stock Cannon) one because the Whirlwind was contaminated.  It would have been a whole lot more difficult if the original installer had used heatshrink over the individual pins, instead of the larger size of clear tubing.

I've prepped wires both ways over the years, but have come to prefer the rubber sleeve technique.  It's quite common in British gear, and I believe it's also common in Mil Spec stuff as well on this side of the ocean.  I'm quite confident that the oil has no adverse effect on the wiring integrity, or it wouldn't have been used for this long in critical applications.  The sleeves do sometimes dry out and crack after years in hot, low humidity environments.  Maybe those ones weren't neoprene.

GTD

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Hal Bissinger/COMSYSTEC

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Re: Wiring job finish, Helsyn
« Reply #12 on: December 08, 2010, 11:16:51 pm »

It would have been a whole lot more difficult if the original installer had used heatshrink over the individual pins, instead of the larger size of clear tubing.

There you are absolutely correct. Shrink should never be used on the pins. In my first job out of high school the company I worked for made equipment that used Amphenol connectors by the thousands. I would venture a guess that I have wired over a million pins like that. We used clear PVC sleeving to insulate the pins just large enough to be a snug fit. One hint is to make it a real snug fit and slide them on while the pin is still warm from soldering. That way they won't come off but can be easily pulled of with needlenose pliers. To cut the sleeving to uniform lengths we made our own cutters. You would feed the sleeving in until it hits a stop then a blade cuts it off.

And your clear sleeving on the drain wires does look like teflon. Should cut easily with the proper stripper.

-Hal  
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