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Author Topic: Sidechain on LS9 gates  (Read 10727 times)

Andrew Broughton

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Re: Sidechain on LS9 gates
« Reply #10 on: December 15, 2010, 01:41:17 am »

Rob Spence wrote on Sat, 11 December 2010 15:07

Oh, and Andy, I really like SOF!!! Nice for standing next to the performer and setting mons levels.

Smile Glad it helps!
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John H. O'Brien

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Re: Sidechain on LS9 gates
« Reply #11 on: December 15, 2010, 02:15:45 am »

So, from what I'm reading, using the 'sidechain' feature allows a user to determine which frequency the gate opens for, or does it just tell the gate to open upon hearing that frequency?
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Jonathan Schroeder

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Re: Sidechain on LS9 gates
« Reply #12 on: December 15, 2010, 11:31:28 am »

John H. O'Brien wrote on Wed, 15 December 2010 01:15

So, from what I'm reading, using the 'sidechain' feature allows a user to determine which frequency the gate opens for, or does it just tell the gate to open upon hearing that frequency?


It opens the gate to the entire signal based on when the selected frequency range hits the threshold, but it still passes the entire signal.

Jon
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John H. O'Brien

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Re: Sidechain on LS9 gates
« Reply #13 on: December 16, 2010, 05:48:36 pm »

huh. something new to try.
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Michael Lewis

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Re: Sidechain on LS9 gates
« Reply #14 on: February 12, 2011, 02:32:03 pm »

Hey guys.. I just started using the side chain of the gates of the LS9.. Any of you can share what type of filter, frequency and Q would you use for the following sources typically?

1) male / female vocals
2) drums (kick, snare, toms, hats).. do you all gate overheads?
3) electric guitar amp cabs

I'm new to using frequency controlled gates so I really don't have much experience and just seeking to learn from the you guys, the pros. Today this is roughly what I did for the gates

vocals : around 1khz and Q = 1, BPF
Kick: around 160Hz and Q = 1, BPF
amp cab: around 600Hz and Q = 1, BPF

(the place was very small so didn't mic up the rest of the drum kit.. I had an overhead mic but didn't gate it.

I know there's no right or wrong but I'm just trying to see if there's a good guideline for using the gates. Any advice is appreciated. Hope to hear from you guys..

I also can't quite grasp the concept of the 'range' control for the gates. Can anyone explain to me? Thank you.
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Jordan Wolf

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Re: Sidechain on LS9 gates
« Reply #15 on: February 13, 2011, 01:32:43 am »

I want to preface this by saying that I am approaching this from an analog standpoint, so it's not exactly in line with the question, but I figured I could interject some info.

Michael Lewis wrote on Sat, 12 February 2011 14:32


1) male / female vocals

None...and why?

Quote:

2) drums (kick, snare, toms, hats).. do you all gate overheads?

Kick: centered around something that the bass guitar won't also activate, though that might not be a bad thing necessarily.

Snare, toms: Use the Key Listen (or similar) function and decide from there...I tend to go for the "body" of the snare rather than the "snap", since the hi-hat can open it if I set the filter frequency too high.

Toms, I just listen for what sticks out from each one and go from there - not very explicit, I know, but it's how I roll.  Depending on the genre, I may tighten up the lower toms' sounds by way of a shorter release time.

Hi-hat, OH's: No gate.

Quote:

3) electric guitar amp cabs

I don't usually use gates on them...but then again, my amount of said units is limited, so I generally let me fingers do the work.


Quote:

I also can't quite grasp the concept of the 'range' control for the gates. Can anyone explain to me? Thank you.

Usually, range (or depth) refers to how much attenuation occurs when the signal is at or below the threshold setting.  

Drawmer's gates, for example, have a setting of either "-90dB" or "-20dB", I believe.  If you set the unit to -90dB, the signal is all but gone when at/below threshold; if you set it to -20dB and are at/below threshold, the signal is only knocked down by 20dB and can still be heard, albeit at a lower level.

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Michael Lewis

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Re: Sidechain on LS9 gates
« Reply #16 on: February 13, 2011, 06:53:26 am »

Jordan Wolf wrote on Sun, 13 February 2011 14:32

I want to preface this by saying that I am approaching this from an analog standpoint, so it's not exactly in line with the question, but I figured I could interject some info.

Michael Lewis wrote on Sat, 12 February 2011 14:32


1) male / female vocals

None...and why?




I work with a lot of smaller stages where the drums or guitar cabs are just within 5-10 meters of the vocal mics. I tend to gate almost everything that I can gate just to clean up the mix as much as I can. Without gates, the mix will be a big mess. Vocals mics are usually what I have trouble with without gates as they pick up almost everything on stage when the stage is very small and there's a full band playing on it.
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Jordan Wolf

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Re: Sidechain on LS9 gates
« Reply #17 on: February 13, 2011, 11:35:44 pm »

Michael Lewis wrote on Sun, 13 February 2011 06:53

Jordan Wolf wrote on Sun, 13 February 2011 14:32

I want to preface this by saying that I am approaching this from an analog standpoint, so it's not exactly in line with the question, but I figured I could interject some info.

Michael Lewis wrote on Sat, 12 February 2011 14:32


1) male / female vocals

None...and why?




I work with a lot of smaller stages where the drums or guitar cabs are just within 5-10 meters of the vocal mics. I tend to gate almost everything that I can gate just to clean up the mix as much as I can. Without gates, the mix will be a big mess. Vocals mics are usually what I have trouble with without gates as they pick up almost everything on stage when the stage is very small and there's a full band playing on it.

I understand your frustration.  The problem I have noticed with gating vocals is that, while the gate does help when no one's singing, when there is singing, all the mess comes back into the mix.

Maybe the group's mic technique needs to be improved upon or stage volume needs to be better regulated?
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Michael Lewis

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Re: Sidechain on LS9 gates
« Reply #18 on: February 14, 2011, 02:51:03 am »

Jordan Wolf wrote on Mon, 14 February 2011 12:35

Michael Lewis wrote on Sun, 13 February 2011 06:53

Jordan Wolf wrote on Sun, 13 February 2011 14:32

I want to preface this by saying that I am approaching this from an analog standpoint, so it's not exactly in line with the question, but I figured I could interject some info.

Michael Lewis wrote on Sat, 12 February 2011 14:32


1) male / female vocals

None...and why?




I work with a lot of smaller stages where the drums or guitar cabs are just within 5-10 meters of the vocal mics. I tend to gate almost everything that I can gate just to clean up the mix as much as I can. Without gates, the mix will be a big mess. Vocals mics are usually what I have trouble with without gates as they pick up almost everything on stage when the stage is very small and there's a full band playing on it.

I understand your frustration.  The problem I have noticed with gating vocals is that, while the gate does help when no one's singing, when there is singing, all the mess comes back into the mix.

Maybe the group's mic technique needs to be improved upon or stage volume needs to be better regulated?


I do agree with your point. We do ask the bands to tone their volume down, use smaller drum sets, face the amps away from the mics, singers to kiss their mics.. etc.. but I find that gating vocals do help to make the vocals clearer. I've actually done the same show at the same venue for the past 10 years using all sorts of different systems.

I've tried with and without gate at this particular school hall's stage and there's a big difference especially when I use side chain with fast attack and decay. So far the best result I got is by using a pair of QSC K10 speakers on vocal boost setting and mixing with the Yamaha LS9 with the gates on on almost everything. The school hall is very reverberant, so the gates do help in intelligibility.
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