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Author Topic: Sub supression  (Read 4111 times)

Charles Wick

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Sub supression
« on: November 10, 2010, 11:02:05 pm »

We have recently put our subs on our stage at my church. The stage is about 24 inches off of a cement floor. I was wondering if there was something that we can put under the cabinets to dampen the sound/feeling from the subs to those who are on the stage? Thanks.
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Paul O'Brien

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Re: Sub supression
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2010, 10:55:21 am »

The solution is put the subs back on the floor where they belong.
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Silas Pradetto

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Re: Sub supression
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2010, 10:57:59 am »

Generally, people put subs on the stage so they can feel them...not the other way around...

Also remember, if you have subs on either side of the stage, those that are approximately equidistant from the subs are going to get SLAMMED with the power alley, and that's not going to change no matter where the subs are (unless the equidistant factor changes).
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Art Welter

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Re: Sub supression
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2010, 12:27:42 pm »

Charles Wick wrote on Wed, 10 November 2010 21:02

We have recently put our subs on our stage at my church. The stage is about 24 inches off of a cement floor. I was wondering if there was something that we can put under the cabinets to dampen the sound/feeling from the subs to those who are on the stage? Thanks.


Equarack Speaker Mounts would reduce the transmission of mechanical speaker vibration to the stage floor .
http://www.equarack.com/speaker-mounts.htm

There are other products that reduce mechanical coupling, these have the advantage of being weight adjustable.

However, it is likely that most of the vibration is caused acoustically, eliminating or reducing mechanical speaker vibration to the floor may only slightly reduce the problem.

Art Welter
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Duane Massey

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Re: Sub supression
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2010, 05:45:47 pm »

+1 to Art's post
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Duane Massey
Houston, Texas, USA

Charles Wick

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Re: Sub supression
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2010, 07:02:27 pm »

Thank You Mr. Art for the reply. That is what I was wanting.

When we had the subs on the floor, it sounded horrible and it flooded the first few rows of the floor with low end. We tried to change the settings, but it was still bad. Now they are on the stage, the room is more balanced with the highs and the lows, thus sounding better. But the worship team isn't used to the low end so much on the stage.

Or current set up is having 7 DB Tech DVA T-4's in the sky and 2 Renkus-Heinz PN212 subs on the floor, with about 30-35 feet between them.
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Josh Billings

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Re: Sub supression
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2010, 05:18:48 pm »

Wouldn't just normal floor spikes work? Would probably damage the floor a bit, but should do a good job.

-Josh
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Art Welter

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Re: Sub supression
« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2010, 08:53:09 pm »

Josh Billings wrote on Fri, 12 November 2010 15:18

Wouldn't just normal floor spikes work? Would probably damage the floor a bit, but should do a good job.

-Josh

Don't know what you mean by "normal" floor spikes, but a spike will transmit mechanical energy just fine.
Put a nail between your teeth and put the pointy end on a loud sub cabinet if you doubt that fact.

Spikes do tend to prevent movement of a cabinet.
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: Sub supression
« Reply #8 on: November 25, 2010, 10:24:46 pm »

Air space.  Say, 18-24 feet of it.
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drewgandy

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Re: Sub supression
« Reply #9 on: November 28, 2010, 04:40:06 pm »

Art Welter wrote on Fri, 12 November 2010 19:53


Put a nail between your teeth and put the pointy end on a loud sub cabinet if you doubt that fact.



I just can't help but think that you suggest this from experience.  

Care to tell us about it?

drew
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Ivan Beaver

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Re: Sub supression
« Reply #10 on: November 28, 2010, 04:53:31 pm »

Tim McCulloch wrote on Thu, 25 November 2010 22:24

Air space.  Say, 18-24 feet of it.

As the general rule to prevent sound transmission is as follows:
MASS-airspace-MASS (the 2 mass walls are not attached to each other), and airtight.

Anything else is a start to a compromise.
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Tim Padrick

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Re: Sub supression
« Reply #11 on: December 04, 2010, 10:38:10 pm »

I think what the spikes do is minimize movement between the cab and the floor - the cab is no longer pounding on the floor.

Cab on floor - especially if there is carpet: Note the amount of energy you feel in the room and the amount you feel in your feet from the floor.  Now spike the cabinet - you feel more in the room and less through your feet from the floor (yes, I've done this).

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