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Author Topic: Public Liability Insurance Freelance Guys  (Read 5434 times)

steven barnes

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Public Liability Insurance Freelance Guys
« on: August 06, 2010, 10:35:58 am »

How many freelance guys carry public liability insurance?

I just got my renewal and was wondering if this was something a freelancer would normally carry. I current have a million policy that runs around $1700.00 a year and allows me to do certain install and permanent work, as well as shows.

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Steven Barnes
SB Technical Services
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Dick Rees

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Re: Public Liability Insurance Freelance Guys
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2010, 10:58:22 pm »

I carry event liability insurance.  It costs me very little for the $2 million minimum it takes to work in the Parks and City of St Paul.  It is written for me alone and the premium is based on my gross business receipts.  If I have help, my premium is adjusted according to a formula based on their total hours of work.  
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JonathanSmith

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Re: Public Liability Insurance Freelance Guys
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2011, 06:33:43 pm »

I apologize for the revival of the dead thread. This just shows that the search function isn't the worst thing since the invention of the internet.

A company I'm interested in working with requires liability and workman's comp insurance. The insurance guys I've been talking to are having a difficult time classifying my business. One has me as Electrical Work - Standard Voltage. One has me as Electrical Work - Low Voltage. My usual insurance company (USAA) has no idea how to classify me and won't provide a quote.

What insurance companies are you folks using? How are you classified?
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Dick Rees

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Re: Public Liability Insurance Freelance Guys
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2011, 07:08:59 pm »

JonathanSmith wrote on Mon, 17 January 2011 17:33

I apologize for the revival of the dead thread. This just shows that the search function isn't the worst thing since the invention of the internet.

A company I'm interested in working with requires liability and workman's comp insurance. The insurance guys I've been talking to are having a difficult time classifying my business. One has me as Electrical Work - Standard Voltage. One has me as Electrical Work - Low Voltage. My usual insurance company (USAA) has no idea how to classify me and won't provide a quote.

What insurance companies are you folks using? How are you classified?



??????
What will you be doing?
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JonathanSmith

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Re: Public Liability Insurance Freelance Guys
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2011, 07:53:37 pm »

Dick Rees wrote on Mon, 17 January 2011 17:08




??????
What will you be doing?


Standard audio production work. Primarily corporate.
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Dick Rees

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Re: Public Liability Insurance Freelance Guys
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2011, 08:01:00 pm »

I'm no expert, but it sounds like they're wanting you to work as a sub-contractor instead of an employee.  As such you'll have to check with the State of Colorado (or whichever state you're working in) and find out what is required.  IME, it makes a difference if you're working solo or if you're providing other crew members in your role as subcontractor.  In my situation I have no employees and hire out solo, so my insurance is less expensive.

The touchy point is the workmans comp.  I would hope for your sake that the state would require the general contractor to pay the workmans comp.

Good luck.
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JonathanSmith

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Re: Public Liability Insurance Freelance Guys
« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2011, 09:05:46 pm »

Dick Rees wrote on Mon, 17 January 2011 18:01

I'm no expert, but it sounds like they're wanting you to work as a sub-contractor instead of an employee.  



Correct. I've been hired as a sub-contractor and have had myself set up as a business for years, but this is the first time that insurance has been required.

That being said, does anyone have a recommendation of an insurance carrier and what our work would be classified as?
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: Public Liability Insurance Freelance Guys
« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2011, 12:27:01 am »

JonathanSmith wrote on Mon, 17 January 2011 20:05

Dick Rees wrote on Mon, 17 January 2011 18:01

I'm no expert, but it sounds like they're wanting you to work as a sub-contractor instead of an employee.  



Correct. I've been hired as a sub-contractor and have had myself set up as a business for years, but this is the first time that insurance has been required.

That being said, does anyone have a recommendation of an insurance carrier and what our work would be classified as?


I'd start with a call or email to the Colorado Dept of Labor.  There are standardized occupation codes that don't reflect what you do, but they can help find something close (hint: recording/video production/motion pictures).  Once you have a code number and occupation name it should get easier with insurers.  Liability should be easy and fairly cheap.  Work comp rates are set by experience in a given occupation for a geographic area and the employers (you) gross wages.

When I free lance, I use the same payroll service as my IATSE Local.  They handle all the usual tax withholding, cover the employer share of FICA/Medicare/Medicade and unemployment; work comp & liability insurance is included in their client charge of 36%.  I include it as a line item on my invoice, or they can put me on their payroll as an employee if they think it's too much.

The reality is, you're probably NOT an independent contractor: they supply all/some/part of the equipment you'll be using, they tell you when to report to work and when you're released, etc.

Have fun, good luck.

Tim Mc
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