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Author Topic: Trailer Packing  (Read 9532 times)

(BJ) Benjamin Fisher

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Re: Trailer Packing
« Reply #10 on: May 25, 2010, 09:15:20 pm »

Jeff Wheeler wrote on Tue, 25 May 2010 20:06

I want e-track but it's too low on my "priority list" to have bought it yet.  So when my trailer isn't totally full, I have to lay some things down to keep them from shifting or falling during transit.  Even with two double 18s, four double 15s, two racks, a big trunk, four wedges, and two mic bags, I have all the double 15s laying down right now to keep the objects around them from walking around.  I really need to buy covers for them soon because this is where most of my scratches and dings come from.

Atleast get some D rings and some straps man!  Smile
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BJ Fisher
Stealthy Sound
Columbus,OH

James Henriksen

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Re: Trailer Packing
« Reply #11 on: May 25, 2010, 09:56:59 pm »

I love this forum.  I dont participate enough, but the wealth of information is priceless.  I'm in the process of buying a truck (2007 Nissan Titan King Cab) and in the market for a trailer for my gear, and I've quickly learned that:

A)  A 6x10 single axle will not fit my needs, too small and too under-rated.
B)  I need a trailer capable of 5000 lbs of cargo plus trailer weight, i.e, dual axle trailer w/ brakes and a minimum of 7x14, preferrably 7x16.
C)  I'm comfortably in the towing capacity of my truck, but not by much.

Now the tough part comes with finding the trailer within my budget. Sad Probably not gonna happen soon, gotta save up some more $$ and rent a uhaul in the mean time.

Now here comes a thread about weight distibution.  Perfect!  I have some input.  In a 6x12 uhaul, which i've used a few times, I put my 4 subs in the hitch end, followed by amp racks, and then board, top cabs, stands, etc.  Cable bins get packed on top of that in the front as well.

It's tended to be about 60/40 I think, never had an issue when pulling w/ my friends F-150.  

Thank god I'm getting my own truck & trailer so I can stop beg, borrowing, and renting.

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James
JMHAudio.com

Dave Junius

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Re: Trailer Packing
« Reply #12 on: May 25, 2010, 10:11:15 pm »

Yeah, I love the bearing buddies as they are called. Just put the grease gun to them about once or twice a year and your good to go. Fast, easy, and no mess.

David Junius
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Dave Junius

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Re: Trailer Packing
« Reply #13 on: May 25, 2010, 10:16:05 pm »

I would have to check, but I believe that my trailer (6x10 Horton Hauler) stated in a manual not to have more than 1000 lbs. Max tongue weight. I am sure that this varies for different brands and sizes of trailers though.

David Junius
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(BJ) Benjamin Fisher

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Re: Trailer Packing
« Reply #14 on: May 25, 2010, 10:30:19 pm »

Dave Junius wrote on Tue, 25 May 2010 21:11

Yeah, I love the bearing buddies as they are called. Just put the grease gun to them about once or twice a year and your good to go. Fast, easy, and no mess.

David Junius

Is that what they are called? Cool. All I know is I have them, haha. I couldnt remember though how often the guy that sold it to me said to fill em up. Should probably do that this week.
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BJ Fisher
Stealthy Sound
Columbus,OH

Jan Andersson

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Re: Trailer Packing
« Reply #15 on: May 26, 2010, 09:04:31 am »

Kristian Johnsen wrote on Wed, 26 May 2010 02:24


In Europe the law says that the hitch should have a downward force when parked of no more than I believe 100 Kg (about 200 LBS).  The unscientific rule of thumb is:  If you can't lift the hitch you need to move some weight further back.

Considering this, I wouldn't unconditionally follow your advice.


Yes my vehicles hitching point has a maximum limit of 150kg downward weight from the trailer so the "human lift test" works fine for it, if you cannot lift the hitch then its too heavy and balance needs readjusting. throw in some straps to keep stuf in order and you are ready to go.
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Marlow Wilson

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Re: Trailer Packing
« Reply #16 on: May 26, 2010, 09:44:42 am »

Jan Andersson wrote on Wed, 26 May 2010 09:04

Kristian Johnsen wrote on Wed, 26 May 2010 02:24


In Europe the law says that the hitch should have a downward force when parked of no more than I believe 100 Kg (about 200 LBS).  The unscientific rule of thumb is:  If you can't lift the hitch you need to move some weight further back.

Considering this, I wouldn't unconditionally follow your advice.


Yes my vehicles hitching point has a maximum limit of 150kg downward weight from the trailer so the "human lift test" works fine for it, if you cannot lift the hitch then its too heavy and balance needs readjusting. throw in some straps to keep stuf in order and you are ready to go.


This could easily turn into a European vs American towing practices debate.  The way I see it, if you are in America, do as the Americans do.  That means 10-15%.  Most American made trailers have the axle positioned further back so that even loading across the surface will give you good distribution to the point that I sometimes have to be careful not to put too much weight up front.  The attached pic is just an example, but if you drop and amp rack and a bunch of copper right at the front you may well cause other problems.  I usually put subs in first (they take up some front space and are not too heavy/not too light) and then position the heavy stuff just before the axle (or axles).  Read up on how to measure your trailer weight (at a weigh station) and then about how to measure the tongue weigh with a bathroom scale regardless of weight.  See how here:

 http://www.curtmfg.com/index.cfm?event=pageview&contentp ieceid=1347

A lot of guys here have a set pack layout, but for me each gig requires different stuff so it's always a bit of loading and unloading to get it how I want.  I also have a second trailer and tow vehicle to use instead of pushing limits of overall weight and optimal distribution.  It's sometimes faster to quickly pack two trailers half full then to have to squeeze every last inch out of what I've got in one.  This is especially true at during 4 am loadouts after long days!!  I also prefer having two smaller trailers to one larger one for doing separate gigs.  Obviously I have helpers to drive and most gigs are within the city.  My first trailer was just a 5x8 so you are doing well by starting with a 6x12.

Good luck,

Marlow

index.php/fa/30389/0/


(forgot pic!)
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Art Welter

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Re: Trailer Packing
« Reply #17 on: May 26, 2010, 10:09:21 am »

Jeff Hague wrote on Tue, 25 May 2010 17:10

Yes, sorry - front meaning the hitch end. You want most of the weight ahead of the axle where the hitch seems to have some control over lateral movement. I dont know the physics behind it but I do know (from experience) that if you have most of the weight behind the axle, it will fishtail - wildly if you try to go fast...


The weight center should be over the axles, not in front or behind the axles.

As far as loading, the most important aspect is to get most of the the weight over the axles, and also have the proper amount and ratio (10% of the weight of the trailer and load) of tongue weight. Equalization bars are a help with heavy tongue weight, keeps your truck from hobby horsing when you hit bumps.

If the heavy stuff is in the front and back, the trailer can whipsaw uncontrollably.
If it is packed correctly, no problem. I towed my 18” tandem axle from north of Duluth down to Albuquerque, loaded to about 6000 pounds with no incidents, towing it with  a 1987 Chevy Astro.

On the other hand, one time I attempted to haul it for a short trip across town with only about 1000 pounds of gear  located behind the rear axle, and a similar weight of shop equipment in the very front, the middle of my trailer being my empty “shop”.

The trailer became totally uncontrollable  once I let off power going down hill at about 32 miles per hour. It swung my van into a retaining wall so hard it broke the class three hitch off the van (and with it the retaining chains), and I had to herd the runaway trailer across several lanes of traffic- stupid St. Paul left hand entrance ramp. Stupid me for not re-loading the trailer in an attempt to save time.

The way a trailer is loaded makes more difference than the weight as far as handling.

Art Welter
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Joe Brugnoni

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Re: Trailer Packing
« Reply #18 on: May 26, 2010, 11:36:28 am »

Bearing buddies are great, but you should still Rebuild them every year or so just to get the crud and wear out of them..

When I say rebuild, i just mean to take them apart and check them for wear, In double axle trailers maybe every two years but single axle trailers loaded heavy,  every year,  It takes about one hour.
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Terry Martin

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Re: Trailer Packing
« Reply #19 on: May 26, 2010, 11:57:23 am »

We pack the trailer so that everything fits.  Weight is considered, but not heavily 'weighed' in the decision.  The trailer has been weighed when loaded, and we are right at capacity.  Other than what you see in the pic, the truss (two 10' sticks) hangs from the roof structure using eyebolts and straps.  Light bars (4x4) hang from the truss.


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