ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: 7000+ psi concrete anchors  (Read 3515 times)

jeffhtg (Jeff Kenney)

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1019
7000+ psi concrete anchors
« on: May 14, 2009, 07:01:03 pm »

So the previous post about my tilt wall ordeal and not having enough furring space ordeal continues.

I noticed the electricians are using expanding anchors in the concrete. Tapcons don't work. Is this what everyone else is using? There are sections I am having to use HDPE and pvc that seems to work well.. but the anchoring of said conduit is a pain.

Concrete is 7000+ with steel reinforcement.
Logged

Mac Kerr

  • SR Forums
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 10223
Re: 7000+ psi concrete anchors
« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2009, 07:13:43 pm »

I've generally seen expanding bolt anchors like Hilti. These require drilling which is time consuming. They also sell direct fasteners that can be driven by air, powder, or gas driven tools. I don't know how hard the concrete can be. They say they can be driven into steel, but I assume that is light steel hardware, not I-Beams.

Mac
Logged

Charlie Zureki

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4369
Re: 7000+ psi concrete anchors
« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2009, 07:24:22 pm »

jeffhtg (Jeff Kenney) wrote on Thu, 14 May 2009 18:01

So the previous post about my tilt wall ordeal and not having enough furring space ordeal continues.

I noticed the electricians are using expanding anchors in the concrete. Tapcons don't work. Is this what everyone else is using? There are sections I am having to use HDPE and pvc that seems to work well.. but the anchoring of said conduit is a pain.

Concrete is 7000+ with steel reinforcement.




  Jeff,

   what seem to be the problem with Tapcons?  Are you hitting steel?  Are the Tapcons not going in?  Are they not staying in?

Is the Concrete too hard?   Too soft,and powdery?

Are you using Tapcons with hex heads or philip type heads?  Is this Block, Brick or Concrete?


Use a Hammer Drill with:

 Too powdery Concrete... smaller diameter drill bit than the suggested size on the Tapcon package. Holding the Hammer Drill tightly,  make the hole ... in one run in... and slowly back out. NO EXCESS drilling, and no lateral movement of the bit.

Slowly drive the Tapcon in with a Battery Powered Drill-Driver just tight enough and STOP.


For Hard Concrete .... get the next bigger size Hammer Drill Bit than suggested on package (if the Tapcons are too hard to sink) (Sae or Metric)

Same as above ...drilling just enough to make the hole and backing out slowly.. No lateral movements

Drive the Tapcon in with Battery Powered Drill Driver just tight enough and stop.  Still too tight? After clearing Concrete dust from hole.... pull Tapcon threads across bar of soap.

Find the Hardened Tapcons ... "Industrial Strength", hex heads, use the proper driver bit to drive them.  Use the proper Drill bit for the size Tapcon. (see above)


Good Tools make the difference.. Buy good bits and use a good Hammer drill.

Cheers,
Hammer

Logged
Be prepared, you'll need it!

Joules Newell

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 21
    • http://www.pureinstall.co.uk/
Re: 7000+ psi concrete anchors
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2009, 12:03:21 am »

Mac Kerr wrote on Fri, 15 May 2009 00:13

I've generally seen expanding bolt anchors like Hilti. These require drilling which is time consuming. They also sell direct fasteners that can be driven by air, powder, or gas driven tools. I don't know how hard the concrete can be. They say they can be driven into steel, but I assume that is light steel hardware, not I-Beams.

Mac

My Hilti DX450 will nail into an I-beam no problem.
http://www.didcotplant.co.uk/images/fixing/cartridge_hammer.jpg


What you really need is a Spit gas nail gun.

http://www.tool-net.co.uk/data/tools/pugupulsa700e.jpg

Check this little demo out.

http://www.itwcp.co.uk/Videos/700E_Video/700E_Video.html

All the electricians here are using them and they are absolutely flying along with them.

Edit:
Looks like they are connected to Paslode, don't know about availability in the us.
Logged
I get about a bit!

1999-2001 HSL Productions
2001-2003 Community Loudspeakers UK Tech support
2003-2006 Lynx Lighting
2006-2008 CVA / ESL
2008-today Pure Install
http://www.pureinstall.co.uk/

Chris Boschen Leonard

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 107
Re: 7000+ psi concrete anchors
« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2009, 10:43:49 am »

Wow! Someone finally invented something for us low-volt people.

For securing cables overhead, I use standard nylon tie-wraps, attached with tapcons or anchors for concrete, heavy staples for wood. For metal I have to use adhesive, or a strap around the beam, if possible.  

I love the look of this tool, but I wonder if it is more specifically aimed at working on substrates like concrete and steel, more common in the commercial markets. I am usually able to access wood for cable anchor attachments. Anyone using anything else they particularly like for that, besides staples and tie-wraps? If there was a tool to directly staple anchor points like that onto wood, I'd buy it in a second.  
Logged
Chris Leonard
Principal,
Boschen Technologies
www.boschen.org

Stephen Payne

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 517
Re: 7000+ psi concrete anchors
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2009, 03:26:45 pm »

I've used these for structural sheathing on homes.
http://www.stapleheadquarters.com/air-staple-gun-3.html

As for the concrete, a HILTI gun is the way to go. The steel rebar reinforcement won't stop it or interfere at all. You might even just need one of the smaller ones.
Logged
Steve




Pages: [1]   Go Up
 

Page created in 0.089 seconds with 20 queries.