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Author Topic: back to square one  (Read 1954 times)

luis Markson

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back to square one
« on: March 03, 2011, 01:48:26 am »

I've just started reading the Yamaha Sound Reinforcement Handbook cover to cover. I used it as a reference text back in college, but didn't enter a part of the industry that required much of that knowledge. I've just landed a gig as an operator of a small PA that may grow into something of worth (There's been talk of KV2 VHD.. but I think that might just be talk....in fact I would almost bank on it..). Outside of archival and post production work, I've been operating monitors for about 5 years but really didn't engage in anything beyond the fundamentals.. I've been running my own totally unrelated business during this time and have started to reach burn out. I need to move on... So its time to start taking audio seriously again and see If I can make some kind of career for myself.

My plan is to read through the text and look to this forum for clarification of points that I don't find immediately understandable. I also would love recommendations on further texts as I go, when particular topics need more research, which no doubt will be an endless pursuit!

So here we go, question 1 page 1.

In the short description of the frequency attribut of a sound wave, a comment is made that while frequency relates to pitch, so does amplitude:

Quote
Frequency corresponds to the music attribute of pitch. Although pitch is a more complex attribute than frequency (it also involves amplitude)...

What is the relationship between amplitude and pitch and how does that differ from frequency?


« Last Edit: March 03, 2011, 02:01:06 am by luis Markson »
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Jim Thorn

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Re: back to square one
« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2011, 10:38:57 pm »

In the short description of the frequency attribut of a sound wave, a comment is made that while frequency relates to pitch, so does amplitude:

What is the relationship between amplitude and pitch and how does that differ from frequency?

Luis,

   Frequency is an objective measurement of the period of a waveform, but pitch is our subjective sensation related to the period of a waveform.  For the most part, we can think of frequency and pitch as being the same thing -- increasing a tone's frequency increases its pitch -- but our sense of pitch changes with the loudness of the tone.   I had heard of the effect, and assumed that it was so subtle that only researchers had experienced it, but it was very obvious to me one day when I was using a tone generator to sweep through low frequencies to test for a buzzing woofer.  When I thought I had found the frequency that excited a buzzing resonance in the speaker, I ran the volume up and down in an effort to identify the loose parts, and as I increased the volume of the tone, it sounded like the pitch went flat.  An oscilloscope showed that the frequency of the tone generator was not changing, only the amplitude was.  The shift in pitch was not subtle at all -- more than a musical half-step.  I have since had the same experience while listening to test tones in headphones.  I believe I have read that frequencies below the midrange sound flatter as they get louder, and frequencies above the midrange sound slightly sharper as they get louder, but I'm fuzzy on that part.  Find a steady tone source, say 300 Hertz or lower, and try changing the volume as you listen -- it's a real eye-opener!

Jim Thorn
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luis Markson

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Re: back to square one
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2011, 07:17:21 am »

Luis,

   Frequency is an objective measurement of the period of a waveform, but pitch is our subjective sensation related to the period of a waveform.  For the most part, we can think of frequency and pitch as being the same thing -- increasing a tone's frequency increases its pitch -- but our sense of pitch changes with the loudness of the tone.   I had heard of the effect, and assumed that it was so subtle that only researchers had experienced it, but it was very obvious to me one day when I was using a tone generator to sweep through low frequencies to test for a buzzing woofer.  When I thought I had found the frequency that excited a buzzing resonance in the speaker, I ran the volume up and down in an effort to identify the loose parts, and as I increased the volume of the tone, it sounded like the pitch went flat.  An oscilloscope showed that the frequency of the tone generator was not changing, only the amplitude was.  The shift in pitch was not subtle at all -- more than a musical half-step.  I have since had the same experience while listening to test tones in headphones.  I believe I have read that frequencies below the midrange sound flatter as they get louder, and frequencies above the midrange sound slightly sharper as they get louder, but I'm fuzzy on that part.  Find a steady tone source, say 300 Hertz or lower, and try changing the volume as you listen -- it's a real eye-opener!

Jim Thorn

Thankyou Jim.  :D
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