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Author Topic: Forms, handouts, etc.  (Read 789 times)

Dick Rees

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Forms, handouts, etc.
« on: February 20, 2009, 03:14:06 pm »

Here's a document I created for a client to send out with their performers contracts.  If it's any use, feel free.  If you have your own examples you'd like to share on ANY facet of the process I'd be interested to see them.

Friends:

Here are a few notes in advance to help things run smoothly with your performance.

1.  Please have everything with you:  power supplies, cords, stands, etc.

2.  Your performance is finished when all your gear is off stage.  Please be considerate of the following act and remove your stuff as quickly as safety permits.

3.  Please supply a stage plot and/or input list for your group in advance to make transitions and set-up more effective.

THE MAIN ISSUE  this year will be overall SOUND LEVEL.  We will be much closer to residences and should be considerate of the neighbors.  The city has clear and reasonable guidelines for SPL and we must conform to them.  What this means to us as musicians/sound people is:

1.  On-stage volume must be kept to a reasonable level.  This means your amps cannot be run at high volume as that will require the PA to be run louder still to get everything in the mix.  It is entirely possible to exceed the city SPL ratings with just guitar amps and drums on a highly reflective stage, so please work with the sound crew so that we can have a good mix and peace with the neighbors.

2.  Consider using an amp stand that elevates the amp and tilts it up at you.
This will make it much easier for you to hear yourself without having to turn it up to 11.  

3.  Pointing the amp ACROSS the stage rather than at the audience will also help.  The sound guy will make sure the audience hears you and will have an easier time getting a better overall mix without trying to push everything over the loudest on-stage amp.

Thanks in advance for your consideration.  


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Tom Reid

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Re: Forms, handouts, etc.
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2009, 04:10:50 pm »

Dick Rees wrote on Fri, 20 February 2009 14:14

Here's a document I created for a client to send out with their performers contracts.  If it's any use, feel free.  If you have your own examples you'd like to share on ANY facet of the process I'd be interested to see them.

Friends:

Here are a few notes in advance to help things run smoothly with your performance.

1.  Please have everything with you:  power supplies, cords, stands, etc.




We have batteries, short extension cords, patch cords, strings, sticks and picks but these are at an extra price and not part of your package.

Dick Rees wrote more



2.  Your performance is finished when all your gear is off stage.  Please be considerate of the following act and remove your stuff as quickly as safety permits.




An area will be secured behind, beside, or somewhere near the stage that can be used as an assembly area.  

Dick Rees wrote more



3.  Please supply a stage plot and/or input list for your group in advance to make transitions and set-up more effective.

THE MAIN ISSUE  this year will be overall SOUND LEVEL.  We will be much closer to residences and should be considerate of the neighbors.  The city has clear and reasonable guidelines for SPL and we must conform to them.  What this means to us as musicians/sound people is:

1.  On-stage volume must be kept to a reasonable level.  This means your amps cannot be run at high volume as that will require the PA to be run louder still to get everything in the mix.  It is entirely possible to exceed the city SPL ratings with just guitar amps and drums on a highly reflective stage, so please work with the sound crew so that we can have a good mix and peace with the neighbors.

2.  Consider using an amp stand that elevates the amp and tilts it up at you.
This will make it much easier for you to hear yourself without having to turn it up to 11.  

3.  Pointing the amp ACROSS the stage rather than at the audience will also help.  The sound guy will make sure the audience hears you and will have an easier time getting a better overall mix without trying to push everything over the loudest on-stage amp.

Thanks in advance for your consideration.  





Hearing is an important facility to have, expecially if you are a musician.  If you are too loud, we will not suffer your abuse.
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tom

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