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Author Topic: Peavey IPR pricing: can this possibly be right?  (Read 36726 times)

Chris Van Duker

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Re: Peavey IPR pricing: can this possibly be right?
« Reply #10 on: February 18, 2009, 08:31:23 pm »

I think it's reasonable to assume that most of the major amp manufacturer's products meet their specs. My last experience with a Peavey amp was 15 years ago, with a 3RU CS-800. I don't have any Peavey amps in inventory, but that's mainly because until now they haven't had medium-to-high-power, light-weight amps to sell. (Other than the Decca, which I've heard had some reliability problems.)

My first digital system controllers were some CEX-4L units, which I bought used and broken for $150 for 3 of them. I got them all working myself, and two of them still get some use even now. When I started using them, I stopped blowing drivers, and it was probably one of the best and cheapest system upgrades I've ever made. With that experience, I came around to feeling that a lot of the anti-Peavey vitriol I've heard over the years was simple elitism.

I haven't bought a lot of Peavey gear, but I remain open to the possibility that any of their products might be the best tool for a particular job. And if and when I do buy it, I won't cover the logo.
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Renard Hurtado

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Re: Peavey IPR pricing: can this possibly be right?
« Reply #11 on: February 18, 2009, 08:43:24 pm »

Well, I doubt this pricing, because it will be cannibalism. Who`s gonna buy the heavier CS-4000 & CS-4080?

Or this new amp. must be of a less quality (sound wise and build-wise) compared to the CS- series. The GPS series would be ranked even higher ?

Although I hope that it's nor priced much higher then the CS-series.

On the other hand if it has a street priced as mentioned above, for us living outside the states ( and not heaving great technicians at our disposal), this will be a great disposable amp ( I would be happy if it lasts three years)

Lets see, manufacturers are bringing great new products in difficult times.

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RYAN LOUDMUSIC JENKINS

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Re: Peavey IPR pricing: can this possibly be right?
« Reply #12 on: February 18, 2009, 11:47:39 pm »

I don't know why so many people worry so much about how long an amp can give full rated output for!   When was the last time you has a kick drums attack last for 4 seconds or 8 seconds or what ever?!!!!  Maybe a low frequency sweep in some EDM song at a rave but then you might want to keep more of an eye on the amount of power getting to your drivers anyways so you probably won't want full output from you amp anyways!

Then there are those out there that for some reason don't think Peavey can make a product at an affordable price that will last. Are you guys out of your minds.  I see more 20+ year old peavey stuff being used by real musicians in less than perfect conditions and they keep going.  We're talking about a company that probably has the BEST track record for making long lasting gear.  I don't have my 25 year old Peavey powered mixer anymore because I gave it to a friend who is still using it.

I recently saw an awesome circa 1985ish Peavey TNT 130 bass amp for sale that was in mint condition and sounded perfect.  I should have bought it but I didn't.  Those were always one of my favorite bass amps.

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Ryan Jenkins
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: Peavey IPR pricing: can this possibly be right?
« Reply #13 on: February 19, 2009, 12:19:40 am »

RYAN LOUDMUSIC JENKINS wrote on Wed, 18 February 2009 22:47

I don't know why so many people worry so much about how long an amp can give full rated output for!   When was the last time you has a kick drums attack last for 4 seconds or 8 seconds or what ever?!!!!  Maybe a low frequency sweep in some EDM song at a rave but then you might want to keep more of an eye on the amount of power getting to your drivers anyways so you probably won't want full output from you amp anyways!

And that, Mr. Jenkins, is exactly where the rub is.

This discussion is currently in the Lounge:  http://srforums.prosoundweb.com/index.php/t/42505/143/

Power amp designs that come from industrial process gene pools do better in "continuous output" uses because, DOH! that's what they were designed for.  The lightweight amps, switch mode, PFC, etc- do as well as they can be permitted to do by the necessities of mains current limits.  While some folks think of the "short term output" rating as a lie, it's not... it's neither the same design nor the same application.

For most of the Classic LAB users, the PV isn't a blip on the radar but I think it's important.  This will advance the market for such gear and the professional grades of these technologies and designs will follow.

It's up to the user to determine what amps do the job needed, and what purchase price, repair frequency, and longevity provide an acceptable ROI for the user.

Have fun, good luck.

Tim Mc
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: Peavey IPR pricing: can this possibly be right?
« Reply #14 on: February 19, 2009, 11:31:08 am »

Customers basically get exactly as much duty cycle as they are willing to pay for.

Perhaps ironically the old heavy iron (huge) CS800 was 800W until the cows came home, but customers voted with their money to buy cheaper lower duty cycle amps that would put out more power but for less time.  For those not paying attention. The only difference between the 1200W (@ 2x2ohm) CS800x, and 800W (2x4 ohm) CS800 was replacing a fuse with a resettable breaker (to protect the power transformer) and opening up the current limiting. Presto a 1200W amp, but limited to the same long term output as the previous 800W platform.

Any technology platform can be engineered to deliver any duty cycle. The common truism is that more duty cycle, invariably cost more $$. I have seen the customers drive this pursuit of short term power to the limit of acceptable, and to the point where QSC has offered models based on a given platform that trade lower short term peak power for more duty cycle (dropping the rail voltage a few volts, reduces heat dissipation but delivers less peak output.)

It is not the technology.. it's a cognizant design decision based on customer demand. Modern amp technology is remarkable for how much bang we get for a few bux... but we can always complain and second guess the designers. They're just trying to keep the majority of customers happily buying their product.

JR


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Nick Aghababian

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Re: Peavey IPR pricing: can this possibly be right?
« Reply #15 on: February 19, 2009, 12:05:20 pm »

For ~700, I'd try one. If nothing else there is enough power to run a small stick rig with subs off of it, or get some use for that price.
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Dennis Wiggins

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Re: Peavey IPR pricing: can this possibly be right?
« Reply #16 on: February 19, 2009, 01:09:51 pm »

For the electronically challenged (like me), the choice is between an amp that will not falter with unknown and often times unstable AC mains, or go with new technology that may be a little too dependant on whatever power is available.

For my purposes, I will stay with the CS series.

Not meaning to veer, but what happens to these types of power supplies when the AC varies wildly, as is typical in many small venues.

-Dennis Wiggins
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: Peavey IPR pricing: can this possibly be right?
« Reply #17 on: February 19, 2009, 01:43:21 pm »

Dennis Wiggins wrote on Thu, 19 February 2009 12:09

For the electronically challenged (like me), the choice is between an amp that will not falter with unknown and often times unstable AC mains, or go with new technology that may be a little too dependant on whatever power is available.

For my purposes, I will stay with the CS series.

Not meaning to veer, but what happens to these types of power supplies when the AC varies wildly, as is typical in many small venues.

-Dennis Wiggins


Avoid sweeping generalizations about technology. While the CS800s were historically designed to keep on trucking with Mexican or African power (very low lines), some modern amps with PFC and regulated rails, could do that and better.

The customer will generally get what they want and are willing to pay for..  This doesn't mean every new amp is a stone winner... that's why we like to hear feedback from users of new offerings.

Until then, it's just speculation.

JR
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Art Welter

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Re: Peavey IPR pricing: can this possibly be right?
« Reply #18 on: February 19, 2009, 03:30:59 pm »

JR (and Don),

Sorry to pick on Peavey, they make good products at good values.
I probably should not have made the comment I did, since I can’t even remember the model number of the one Peavey I bought, and it was a long time ago.

I can’t seem to find anything on line now that looks like what I remember the amp I bought back then, but it may have been badged PV.

Back in 1993 I was down to only two old power amps, a Yamaha P 2200 and a Crest 2500. The P2200 was rated at 350 into 4 ohms, the Crest less, and I needed more power for some subs that went low but were not very efficient.

The Peavey  I bought  was rated at around 600 at 4, and 1000 at 2, IIRC, so I figured it should be a noticeable step up in power. I found what appeared to be a MI quality amp with a two ohm rating unusual for that time.

My brother had had a ton of CS 400 and CS 800 in rentals for years, and they worked fine, so I figured hey,  I’m just working with a jump blues band, should be OK.

The “new” Peavey seemed too light for a 1000 watt rating though, weighed less than a CS 800 or the Yammie, though I don’t think it used a switching power supply. It seemed more in the CS 400 or Crest 2500 weight range, and as it turned out, usable power range.

Anyway, the Yamaha P2200 put out significantly more SPL with no indicated or audible clipping than the “new” higher rated Peavey model. Fortunately for me the Peavey blew up on the second gig and I was able to return it and get my money back.

Perhaps it was never putting out what it was supposed to, but I suspect what was happening was more along the lines of what you described with the CS800x taken to a further marketing extreme for a market segment that does not spend much time looking at specs.
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Duncan McLennan

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Re: Peavey IPR pricing: can this possibly be right?
« Reply #19 on: February 19, 2009, 04:13:48 pm »

Art Welter wrote on Thu, 19 February 2009 15:30

Anyway, the Yamaha P2200 put out significantly more SPL with no indicated or audible clipping than the “new” higher rated Peavey model. Fortunately for me the Peavey blew up on the second gig and I was able to return it and get my money back.


For what it's worth, every time I've used P2200s (great passive monitor amps, IMO... even now, at least for an install) they sounded much louder than just about anything in their power range.

350w/channel at 4Ω?  I always thought they were significantly more than that!
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dcm
Waterloo & London, Ontario
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