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Author Topic: Measurement Microphones  (Read 86712 times)

BruceOlson

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Re: Measurement Microphones
« Reply #140 on: March 06, 2010, 03:05:23 pm »

Grant Conklin wrote on Sat, 06 March 2010 01:27

Tom Young wrote on Sat, 06 March 2010 00:45


...I queried Avant Electronics and they said:

"Thanks so much for the email & interest in the AK-Type Vii.
It would probably be a very nice measurement mic for you although we don't lay claim to it as such..."




That's weird.  It seems to have everything you'd want in a measurement mic, and they claim it's  
"compared directly to the very finest European omni reference mics....  used for critical acoustical calibration measurements and  testing...  Complies with IEC651 TYPE 1 STANDARDS...  Free-field Microphone (calibration grade)...  "


That makes me suspect it even more, IEC 651 was renamed to 60651 before it was replaced by IEC 61672 in 2002. So they comply with an obsolete standard. Who cares Rolling Eyes , they sure seem not to know what they are talking about.

Ivan Beaver

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Re: Measurement Microphones
« Reply #141 on: March 06, 2010, 03:16:58 pm »

Bob McCarthy wrote on Fri, 05 March 2010 17:38

My SIM3 has level deviation compensation and that is good up to a point............. and the point is that some of my aged (7 years and many miles) mics don't reliably hold their sensitivity steady overnight.  At this point my confidence level is less than perfect - and therefore I do a daily calibration.


I would never (and have never) dialed in sensitivity numbers of multiple based on what they say on the box. That is just a 1 kHz spec. Too loose. I match multiple mic levels based on as wide a freq range as possible.

My mics are getting the same way-but hopefully I will be getting a new set soon. Very Happy

Whenever I am doing a system alignment I save a trace with the mic of the lowest output (my purple one).  I then set up each of hte other mics in the same position and adjust levels so the curves lay on top of each other.  Agreed broadband is much better than a single freq.

This not only helps to compensate for the various mic levels-but also any changes that may have occured in the mic preamp (in my case a MOTU 8 pre).

I use Systune and it will keep the levels for each of the different mics as I jump around during an alignment.
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Johnny Diaz

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Re: Measurement Microphones
« Reply #142 on: November 02, 2011, 02:59:17 pm »

Since this thread is a few years old and I'm about to purchase a few mics in the $600-$700 range which mic would give best to work with Smaart?
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Mac Kerr

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Re: Measurement Microphones
« Reply #143 on: November 02, 2011, 03:14:41 pm »

Since this thread is a few years old and I'm about to purchase a few mics in the $600-$700 range which mic would give best to work with Smaart?

What kind of work are you doing that you need that many mics of that quality? If you are a speaker designer doing critical measurements as part of the design process, or if you are doing installations that require that the measurements use type 1 measurement mics you will want mics of at least that level, probably significantly more expensive.

If you are doing system alignment and eq on touring systems you do not need multiples of that level of microphone. I have one Earthworks mic, and 3 Rational Acoustics mics. That's one at the $500 level, and three at the $80 level. Currently RA has an introductory offer on the ISEMcon EMX-7150 which is a very good value.

There are lots of useful mics available from the low of the RA 420 at $80, to several thousand dollars. It will be easier to recommend one if you give some guidance on how you intend to use it. The price range it may fall in should be a result of a search for a mic that fulfills a functional spec, not the other way around.

Mac
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Johnny Diaz

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Re: Measurement Microphones
« Reply #144 on: November 02, 2011, 03:26:41 pm »

What kind of work are you doing that you need that many mics of that quality? If you are a speaker designer doing critical measurements as part of the design process, or if you are doing installations that require that the measurements use type 1 measurement mics you will want mics of at least that level, probably significantly more expensive.

If you are doing system alignment and eq on touring systems you do not need multiples of that level of microphone. I have one Earthworks mic, and 3 Rational Acoustics mics. That's one at the $500 level, and three at the $80 level. Currently RA has an introductory offer on the ISEMcon EMX-7150 which is a very good value.

There are lots of useful mics available from the low of the RA 420 at $80, to several thousand dollars. It will be easier to recommend one if you give some guidance on how you intend to use it. The price range it may fall in should be a result of a search for a mic that fulfills a functional spec, not the other way around.

Mac

Mac,

I will be doing system alignments and eq on fixed and mobile systems.

Johnny
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Mac Kerr

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Re: Measurement Microphones
« Reply #145 on: November 02, 2011, 03:43:46 pm »

Mac,

I will be doing system alignments and eq on fixed and mobile systems.

Johnny

If you plan on doing multi mic setups, get 1 real good mic, and a few lesser mics. The differences between the great mics and the less great mics generally fall above 10kHz where we do very little in the way of system eq. In the 100Hz-10kHz range even quite cheap mics will perform as well as $1k mics.

Since your original post implied a budget in the $1800-$2100 range you may want 1 Earthworks M30, a fairly rugged measurement mic, and 2 or 3 of the ISEMcons I linked to previously. Or there may be some other upper mid priced and lower mid priced mics that tickle your fancy.

Your budget, and the care they require probably argues against something like a DPA 4007 at $1700, and although they may be serviceable, your pride may dictate better than the Behringer ECM8000.

HERE IS SOME INFO ON TEST MICS.

Mac

« Last Edit: November 02, 2011, 04:01:49 pm by Mac Kerr »
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Chris Johnson [UK]

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Re: Measurement Microphones
« Reply #146 on: November 03, 2011, 08:13:17 am »

AFAIK, the Lectrosonics TM400 is the only wireless currently available that is suitable for test and measurement.


Actually, the Line6 V70 system is perfect for test & measurement. It operates in 2.4Ghz, so best use 5ghz for your wireless control applications. But its virtually as flat as a piece of wire (verified on the workbench) and has negligible latency (again, easily measured and compensated for).

The downside is that its designed for lav mics so you need to use a mic that is internally powered (A-la NTI MiniSPL mic) or a little inline PSU, but its a steal for 350!

We cant buy the Lectro stuff in the UK, so its pretty much the only option for us.

Chris
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Hayden J. Nebus

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Re: Measurement Microphones
« Reply #147 on: November 05, 2011, 10:16:15 pm »

If you plan on doing multi mic setups, get 1 real good mic, and a few lesser mics. The differences between the great mics and the less great mics generally fall above 10kHz where we do very little in the way of system eq.

FWIW, in a qick and dirty dual mic TF test, my TM1 stood shoulder to shoulder with a B&K 4007 right up to 10kHz, where it took a -6dB dive. The TM1 looks to be about -3dB , and the 4007  maybe+ 1.5 dB @10k on their respective datasheets. Given my application (fixed rig), for the price of a couple 58s (maybe betas) it's hard to beat that with a stick. I trust the QC at Audix a schosh more than at Uli & Co.

Thanks to Russ from TTE for lending his B&K for a minute.     
« Last Edit: November 05, 2011, 10:25:53 pm by Hayden J. Nebus »
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Karl Winkler

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Re: Measurement Microphones
« Reply #148 on: November 07, 2011, 10:40:57 am »


We cant buy the Lectro stuff in the UK, so its pretty much the only option for us.


Lectrosonics IS available in the UK, but the R400A receiver is not. You could use an SRa receiver or a Venue system with the HM transmitter - both are UK compliant. Check with Raycom and MTA.
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Gert Sanner

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Re: Measurement Microphones
« Reply #149 on: January 01, 2012, 05:19:18 am »

I like the Beyerdynamic, but I havnt found an adaptor for pistonphones.

I can help with a link.

http://winaudiomls.de/joomla/index.php/en/shop/category/view/7
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Measurement Microphones
« Reply #149 on: January 01, 2012, 05:19:18 am »


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