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Author Topic: recording to pc question  (Read 2919 times)

RogerOwens

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recording to pc question
« on: February 10, 2005, 01:09:57 AM »

ok heres the deal we've got a 13 piece praise band that ive been recording to an alesis adat for about 2 months now. It takes me too long to get very good quality final recordings this way. My main issue is getting all the tracks to line up when i put them in our current set-up. Heres where I need some advice. Can i record 8-12 tracks simultaneously to a pc.
What kind of power am i going to need(processing speed etc)?
Will i need different software to record all 8 tracks at once or will echo provide it?
Which would you choose the Layla 3g(http://www.echoaudio.com/Products/PCI/Layla3G/index.php) or the  AudioFire 12(  http://www.echoaudio.com/Products/FireWire/AudioFire12/index .php)
Is there another product i should look into?
Thanks
-Roger Owens
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Roger Owens
FOH Engineer/Tech Director
New World United Methodist Church
Arlington, TX

Stnicolas

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Re: recording to pc question
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2005, 04:19:56 AM »

I often multitrack from a digital desk into an Alesis HD24. Most of the time the most efficient way that I have to transfer this into my DAW is via realtime recording. I record 24 channels live from tape and it runs for about an hour and a half to hours without any problems. I am using a RME HDSP9652 sound card and going into Nuendo. It seems to work fine. The sound card is one of main things that will make or break this setup. Figure out which program you are going to use and see what other configurations work with that program. If you are coming out of an analog console I would look at the Presonus Firepod. It comes with a version of Cubase that you could use to get started. It would be an everything in one box solution for pretty cheap. I have used the RME Fireface and it is great but double the money. I know you can use up to 3 or 4 of the RME units at one time. I bet if you can easily use two of the Presonus units at one (call the 800 # and verify that though). That would be a great deal for 8 or 16 tracks if you are coming out analog. On the other hand if you are coming out a digital desk, then look at one of the rme cards.

BTW-What part of this wonderful state we call home are you in. I am down in Victoria.  
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Dan Carter

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Re: recording to pc question
« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2005, 05:12:09 AM »

Look into RME's multiface. 8 analog ins, 8 more via litepipe. You could use the converters in the adat you already for the other 8 giving you 16 analog ins. I agree with Nuendo. However there are others that might fit your budget better. A P3/1000/dual hds(one small for OS and progs,one large for audio) would be a minimum that could handle 16 at once. Then you still would have to have mix time.
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David Haile

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Re: recording to pc question
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2005, 01:54:55 PM »

Why not do a recording mix through your Aux outputs?  Just record in stereo to the PC - easy as pie; easier than pie if your board has a digital output.  I'm setting up a complete new system for our church (with an audio consultant) and this is how we plan on doing it.  I was considering recording multitrack but was afraid of the time it would take for a mixdown.  My goal is to be closed up, 4 CD's of the service duplicated, and system off within 15 minutes of the end of the service.  Much more than that and they'll have to start paying someone!
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K. Arnett

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Re: recording to pc question
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2005, 03:03:37 AM »

Stnicolas:

I'm confused. If you use an HD24, why not just transfer those tracks into Nuendo?

RogerOwens:

I too own an HD24 and I simply transfer these tracks into Cubase via firewire. I record all my tracks into the HD24, pull the hard drive, and take it home. I have Cubase SX 3.0. I love this program. It does cost but I've been using Cubase for years. I just keep upgrading. Anyway, in my PC I have a Terratec DMX6fire. It doesn't cost as much as some of the other sound cards out there but I have had no problems with this card. It will record and playback 24 bit audio. I purchased it mainly for the 24 bit playback. I have no need to record multiple tracks directly to my PC and this card is not the card that will enable you to record multiple tracks. If you want to record multi-track directly to your PC you need to do some research to find the best card for your needs. You also need to make sure you have a PC that can handle the work load. Also, I agree with FlatRockMobile, this will take some time. It's not something that you just throw together and expect excellent results. It takes a lot of patients.
You're going to have people give you a ton of ideas but bottom line is you need to do some research to find out what all this equipment can do and what is required to accomplish the final outcome. But most importantly, how much time and money are you willing to spend. Using an aux. out, or something similar, may be the best option if you don’t have the time and money to invest. I hope this helps.
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Kevin Arnett
WesNett, Inc.

Justin Rygel

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Re: recording to pc question
« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2005, 07:10:25 PM »

We use a PowerMac G4-400 running ProTools LE 5.1.1 with a Digi001 to record 8 tracks and have a Behringer ADA8000 on order to up that to 16 tracks.  We have one song, 'Home,' posted at www.vivaharambee.com, and our parent church, which is significantly larger but uses a similar recording system (with a Digi002) has several songs available online at www.marshillchurch.org,  as you can hear, especially from Mars Hill, which has more experienced bands and sound techs (not to mention that they're recording through a Midas XL4 as opposed to our Mackie CR-1604), sound quality from this method can be VERY good.

That said, this system was given to us free and clear and I probably would have chosen MOTU equipment if I was paying for it,  Digidesigns consumer stuff cannot be expanded, so you're limited to 16 tracks (18 if you use the SPDIF inputs) I have used the MOTU 828MK2 with AudioDesk (the software that comes free with MOTU hardware) and was quite impressed, sound quality is great and MOTUs stuff is can all work together as one big system, number of tracks is limited only by the capabilities of your computer.  The Presonus Firestation looks really interesting to me as well.

Consider looking at getting a powermac for the system, if you have the money.  I am growing wary of PC based recording because the software makers are changing over to mac only one by one, as far as full featured programs go, only Cubase and Sonar are still available for PC, (and ProTools, if you go with Digidesign).  There is a reason for this: for this application, macs are just more powerful, a single G5 1.8 comes close to competing with a dual Xeon 3.4 for running plug-ins on multiple tracks, all other things being equal, the dual G5 2.5 runs over twice as many . . . However, depending on you're intentions with the system, a PC platform would probably be completely sufficient.  I just know that I am getting by with a five year old mac and I have had to get rid of any five year old PCs (which were running much less demanding applications)

Whatever platform you go with, get a second hard drive so that the recording program and audio files can be run of different drives.   Running them off of the same drive can lead to nasty artifacts in the recording with relatively modest track counts . . . Also get a lot of RAM . . .

-Justin Rygel
Harambee Church
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Justin Rygel
Federal Way, WA

David Haile

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Re: recording to pc question
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2005, 08:57:51 AM »

jrygel wrote on Tue, 15 February 2005 00:10

We have one song, 'Home,' posted at www.vivaharambee.com


The sound quality is good and the mix is pretty decent, but can you get the drummer to tune up his kick drum?  It has a resonance that sounds like the drum in a marching band.  The normal preference is a non-resonant thump.

David Haile
Fort Collins, CO
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Justin Rygel

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Re: recording to pc question
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2005, 02:09:42 PM »

Yeah, it had a solid head on it in that recording, we replaced the head with one with a hole in it as soon as we heard that recording.  We use an Audix D4 for the kick, which is a more 'honest' mic than what a lot of people use on kicks.  This was one of the first times we used it and I didn't quite realize how picky it is about placement, I've been a bit more careful about placement of that mic since then.  Unfortunately, I haven't had time to get any recordings since then, 'cause my wife just had a baby.  

One thing about doing multitrack recording: it really reveals to you and the musicians what your weaknesses are.

-Justin
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Justin Rygel
Federal Way, WA

ProSoundWeb Community

Re: recording to pc question
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2005, 02:09:42 PM »


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